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Courses

Accounting

A study of accounting theory, record keeping, and the accounting cycle, with emphasis on accounting for the assets and related revenues and expenses reported on financial statements of a business organization.
A continuation of ACCT 201, with emphasis on accounting for the liabilities, owners' equity and related revenues and expenses reported in financial statements of a business organization; and preparation and analysis of financial statements and an introduction to managerial accounting including product costing using job orders and process costing systems and cost-volume-profit relationships.
Prerequisites
ACCT 201
An extension of the theory and principles of financial accounting, with emphasis on FASB pronouncements applicable to accounting for assets.
Prerequisites
ACCT 202
An extension of the theory and principles of financial accounting, with emphasis on FASB pronouncements applicable to liabilities and owners' equity, and Cash Flow Statements; as well as analysis and interpretation of financial position and results of operations of a business organization.
Prerequisites
ACCT 321
A study of the theory and application of federal tax law, with emphasis on income tax law applicable to individuals.
Prerequisites
ACCT 202
A continuation of ACCT 323, with emphasis on income tax law applicable to corporations, partnerships and fiduciaries; and transfer (gift and estate) taxes.
Prerequisites
ACCT 323
A survey of the principles and practices of accounting for and accumulation of costs to manufacture products, with emphasis on job-order and process cost systems; methods of overhead cost distribution, standard cost systems, and departmentalization for cost control.
Prerequisites
ACCT 202
An exploration of the concepts and procedures applicable to an audit of financial statements, with emphasis on procedures to substantiate amounts reported, along with the impact of internal control, quality of available evidence, and statistical sampling on the determination of appropriate procedures.
Prerequisites
ACCT 322
An extension of the theory and principles of financial accounting, with emphasis on FASB pronouncements applicable to accounting for business combinations, international operations and partnerships.
Prerequisites
ACCT 322
An overview of the theory and application of FASB and other authoritative pronouncements related to accounting for governmental, fiduciary and other not-for-profit organizations.
Prerequisites
ACCT 202
Students explore advanced topics in Accounting Information Systems (AIS) needed to understand and use technologies in making decisions in key practice areas of the accounting profession: managerial accounting, financial accounting, auditing, and tax accounting. Course topics include the technologies involved in AIS, types of AIS applications and systems, use of systems technology and database concepts as a philosophy of AIS, internal control issues of AIS, audit issues related to AIS, and systems development issues including the Software Development Life Cycle and current trends in AIS design. Prerequisite: Undergraduate degree in accounting or 30 semeser credits of undergraduate accounting.
This course covers contemporary issues in the accounting field. This class may include recent pronouncements of the Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB), accounting and technology, cash flow analysis, and globalization in the accounting field. The focus of this class will change as the accounting field changes.
Prerequisites
Undergraduate degree in accounting or 30 semester credits of undergraduate accounting
This course focuses on advanced topics of taxation related to business entities. The class is designed to introduce students to topics related to tax research, corporate taxation, partnership taxation, limited liability companies, and capital structure. Students will also examine how these topics effect organizational strategy and management decisions.
This course is designed to enhance a student's understanding of the emerging field of forensic accounting. The course is structured to enhance the ability of students to think critically and to develop the knowledge, skills and attitudes necessary to compete effectively in the rapidly changing world of information technology.
Managerial Accounting at the graduate level examines various methods that are utilized to make decisions within the context of organizational strategy. Effective decisions are linked with management concepts such as strategic position analysis, value chain analysis, and the effects that decisions have on the organization's competitive position. Students will learn how to use both non-financial and financial information to create strategic recommendations for the organization.
This course will cover financial reporting, managerial, auditing, taxation, and information systems issues in governmental and nonprofit entities. Ethics and professional standards, as well as communication and analytical skills, are developed. Students will develop skills at analyzing transactions in a governmental entity and follow their effect on the financial statements.

Anthropology

ANTH 101 and ANTH 102 both present a number of films from different countries, for the most part from within mainstream cinema. The films all have one thing in common: they examine the lives of people and peoples in different circumstances, and see how people and peoples in question understand those circumstances and make sense of their own lives.
ANTH 101 and ANTH 102 both present a number of films from different countries, for the most part from within mainstream cinema. The films all have one thing in common: they examine the lives of people and peoples in different circumstances, and see how people and peoples in question understand those circumstances and make sense of their own lives.
This course provides an introduction to cultural anthropology: in particular, the concept of culture and how it interpenetrates various domains of organization and activitiy - such as adaptation, subsistence, economy, politics, and kinship - in a wide variety of societies and groups. Changing theoretical approaches, fieldwork, ethnography, cross-cultural analysis and comparisons, complex society, and local-regional-global perspectives will all be addressed. This course meets the cultures or social science general education requirement, but not both.
This course pursues themes in cultural anthropology from a variety of domains to focus on how these compare and, especially, contrast in different cultures. Some of the topics to be addressed will include political systems, gender practices, religious beliefs, artistic performance and expression, and reactions to globalization. The main goals are for students to develop an appreciation of diversity among cultures and cultural groups, and understand differences in life conditions. Meets the cultures or social science general education requirement, but not both.
A multidisciplinary study of the Hmong culture utilizing the contributions of anthropology, history, sociology, art and religion including a rudimentary study of the Hmong language.
This course will explore the worlds of different cultures, and how they have been portrayed, primarily through the medium of ethnographic film. The films will be about different cultures and situations, by different filmmakers, and stylistically different. A wide variety of topics will be covered, including: the ways that anthropologists and filmmakers have collaborated, how cultures are represented on film, what happens when anthropology comes to television, and changes in who is represented, by whom, and how. Examples of themes that could be dealt with in the films include: hunting and gathering, migration, music, refugees, and gender issues. Meets the cultures or social Science general education requirement, but not both.
This course will focus on the variety of political understandings, processes, and systems that have existed and exist in non-state societies, and state societies at both the centers and the margins of power. Agents, structures, and institutions of power will be looked at to highlight cultural variability in the practice of politics. Meets the cultures or social science general education requirement, but not both.

Art

An introduction to the visual arts through study of the elements of art, the various art forms and a chronological study of art history.
This course is an introduction to technology as a tool and digital culture as a medium for creative expression and communication in studio art. Students will gain a hands-on understanding of graphic software and hardware in both object-and pixel-oriented programs. The class will consider the impact of computer technology on visual art and culture by means of research and discussion. Using the computer as an art-making tool, students undertake projects that incorporate their own artistic expression.
This course introduces the elements, principles and factors of two dimensional design. A sequenced investigation into the dynamics of various organizing principles using traditional and contemporary media. Development of visual awareness, analytical thinking, craftsmanship, and use of media and techniques will be addressed.
A foundation course in drawing media and techniques, focusing on the study of objects and natural forms in problems and analysis and composition.
A foundation course to introduce basic three dimensional process and materials as well as develop the students’ ability to analyze form and space relationships. The course emphasizes the utilization of a variety of basic materials such as 3D software and printing, wood, plaster, wire and found objects.
This course focuses on the technical aspects of oil painting, such as stretching canvas, mixing, and applying paint, composition and idea development.
Prerequisites
ART 110
An introduction to printmaking with a view to mastering the fundamental procedures and design problems of relief, intaglio, and serigraphy.
Prerequisites
ART 110
Expanded concepts of drawing as related to the realization of form on a two-dimensional surface. The focus of this course is the rendering of objects and natural forms in problems of analysis and composition. Visual information and practice will be derived from: still life, landscape, interiors and the human figure.
Prerequisites
ART 110
This course studies the development of Western art from the prehistoric period to the Renaissance.
An exploration of the history of art from the Renaissance to the present. Concern is given to the major movements and artists and the various influences that affected their development.
This course teaches the techniques of hand-building, glazing and firing of non-functional ceramic sculpture.
This course teaches the basic techniques of wheel throwing, glazing and firing functional and nonfunctional ceramics.
In this course, students use various techniques and media such as plaster, piece molds, wood and metal to produce three-dimensional art forms.
Prerequisites
ART 120
Special Topics courses are studies of selected problems, periods or movements in the subject area not otherwise included in the curriculum. They are typically chosen from a faculty member’s particular expertise and field of scholarly inquiry, and offered to a student or group of students forming an interest in the particular subject matter. The 250 designation denotes a General Education level of instruction and may include an appropriate General Education task to be completed. The 450 designation denotes a senior level degree of sophistication expected in both learning and instruction. A single course may be offered at both levels simultaneously, in which case the syllabus will clearly differentiate the course expectations and assessment measures for students enrolled at each of the two levels. A Special Topics course must be approved by the School of Arts and Sciences Curriculum Committee before it is offered, and it must address one or more Major Outcomes within the discipline.
This is a survey of the art and architecture of Italy and the Renaissance. This class will be a field-based course that focuses on the wealth of art and architecture of Italy. Florence and neighboring towns will be the classroom as you visit some of the world's greatest museums and study the art and architecture from the Etruscans to Brunelleschi and Michelangelo.
Studies in the visual arts of cultures other than the United States and Western Europe. Particular attention will be given to cultural contexts from which these forms emerge.
This course consists of drawing the human figure from direct observation. This course will focus on anatomical structure, pictorial structure and the expressive capacity of the human form.
Prerequisites
ART 110
Human Figure Drawing II allows for further skill development of drawing the human figure from direct observation. This course will focus on anatomical structure, pictorial structure, and the expressive capacity of the human form and will include the use of color media.
This course will focus on planographic printmaking techniques including screen printing, plastic plate lithography, and digital imaging techniques. This course will emphasize combining traditional and digital imaging techniques. Students are expected to work toward a body of images unified by subject and form.
Prerequisites
ART 110
The natural environment is the medium through which students will explore the concepts of natural beauty and form. Students will collaborate with nature to form outdoor site-specific works of art. This course is an investigation of sculptural site activation, exploring the practice of how work gets redefined through its placement within a larger social, political, and environmental sphere of meaning.
Studies in the visual arts of the 20th century: topics in modernism, late modernism, postmodernism, and contemporary art will be covered. Particular attention will be given to cultural contexts from which these forms emerge.
Prerequisites
Prerequisites: ART 100, ART 211, ART 212 or GRAF 112
Students will learn basic and advanced techniques in ceramic mold making. Students will learn how to make basic press molds, multi part slip molds plus more advanced techniques in firing and glazing work.
Prerequisites
ART 222
An in depth study of different materials to create three-dimensional form. Students will gain access to a more in depth study of technical equipment and the ideation process as it pertains to the sculpted object and installation. Students will learn more advanced techniques in metal, plastics, wood, and alternative materials.
Prerequisites
ART 225
An exploration of the transparent watercolor medium and its materials and techniques.
Prerequisites
ART 110
This course is a study in the development of American art from first colonization to the present. ART 372 is a survey of painting, sculpture, and architecture with particular attention given to the historical and cultural contexts from which these forms emerged. The significance of these works from an artistic perspective will be the over-arching concern of this course.
Prerequisites
ART 100 or ART 211 or ART 212 or GRAF 112
This course explores three cultural case studies to understand the relationship between art, aesthetics, and material culture production. The case studies will be drawn from prehistoric, historic, and contemporary cultures to give a broad understanding of the way in which a culture’s unique needs and environment shape the kinds of art objects it produces. Development of visual awareness, analytical thinking, connoisseurship, and theoretical foundations will be addressed.
This course is focused on concentrated study, usually in one print process area chosen by the student, with problems set by the instructor with a view toward idea and technique complexity.
Prerequisites
Prerequisite: ART 204 or ART 304
Specialized problems in drawing are presented in this course, designed to extend the range of each student’s technical and expressive capability.
Prerequisites
ART 110
Intensive work in technical and conceptual development in oils is the focus of this course.
Prerequisites
ART 202
This course involves focused development of specific skills and concepts in ceramics.
Prerequisites
ART 222, ART 223
Specialized problems in sculpture are studied in this course.
Prerequisites
ART 325
A specialized study of techniques, problems and expression with water media.
Prerequisites
ART 330
Special Topics courses are studies of selected problems, periods or movements in the subject area not otherwise included in the curriculum. They are typically chosen from a faculty member’s particular expertise and field of scholarly inquiry, and offered to a student or group of students forming an interest in the particular subject matter. The 250 designation denotes a General Education level of instruction and may include an appropriate General Education task to be completed. The 450 designation denotes a senior level degree of sophistication expected in both learning and instruction. A single course may be offered at both levels simultaneously, in which case the syllabus will clearly differentiate the course expectations and assessment measures for students enrolled at each of the two levels. A Special Topics course must be approved by the School of Arts and Sciences Curriculum Committee before it is offered, and it must address one or more Major Outcomes within the discipline.
Readings, discussion, presentation and writing on historic and contemporary art that emphasizes analysis of the observed tendencies concerning materials, presentation and concepts in the field of art and other related fields. Through this examination students will complete a senior thesis paper that functions as a framework for their portfolio. Students will also engage in learning best professional practices in the art field.
Prerequisites
Prerequisite: Senior Art Major or Minor
Senior Thesis documentation and evaluation, revision, and editing of student work as well as the exhibition itself.
A thesis intended to integrate the arts administration electives completed. It is undertaken with guidance of one or more faculty members and is intended to encourage the student into original investigation to define a problem.
Prerequisites
Prerequisite: Completion of at least 4 out of the 5 courses for the Arts Administration certificate

Athletic Training

This course provides the knowledge, skills and abilities for recognizing medical emergencies and appropriately implementing emergency action plans. Emphasis is placed upon CPR, AED splinting, spine boarding, and treatment for acute medical conditions of the physically active. Students who successfully complete the course will earn basic life support for healthcare providers certification.
This course introduces students to the role of the athletic trainer as a health care provider in a variety of contexts, including: injury and illness prevention, fundamentals of patient care, basing practice on best evidence, ethical decision making, communication, and cultural competence. Basic taping and bracing strategies will be covered.
An overview of taping and care and prevention of athletic injuries.
This course is intended to assess the knowledge of transfer students in taping and emergency care of athletic injuries. Students must have successfully completed a foundational athletic training course at another institution, provide proof of emergency cardiac care training, and received formal acceptance into the Athletic Training Program to be enrolled in this course.
This course introduces students to the basic principles of prevention and health promotion. This course includes a minimum of 45 hours of scheduled clinical experience at a clinical site under the supervision of an approved preceptor.
Prerequisites
AT 144, or special permission by the Director of Athletic Training Education.
This course provides the knowledge and skills for identifying and palpating structures of the human body. This course includes a minimum of 45 hours of scheduled clinical experience at a clinical site under the supervision of an approved preceptor.
Prerequisites
AT 221
This course covers special topics not covered by current courses taught in the department. The particular topic is to be determined by the department according to the current need and interest. This course requires department chair approval.
This course will examine the evaluation, proper referral and management of general medical conditions and disabilities of athletes and other physically active individuals. Pharmacological principles in the treatment of injury, illness and disease of the athlete and physically active will be discussed. This course includes a minimum of 60 hours of scheduled clinical experience at a clinical site under the supervision of an approved preceptor.
Prerequisites
BIO 275
This course focuses on the recognition and evaluation of athletic injuries and conditions occurring to the lower extremity and lower back. This course includes a minimum of 45 hours of schedules clinical experience at a clinical site under the supervision of an approved preceptor.
Prerequisites
BIO 275
This course focuses on the recognition and evaluation of athletic injuries and conditions occurring to the upper extremity, head and neck. This course includes a minimum of 45 hours of scheduled clinical experience at an approved site under the supervision of an approved preceptor.
Prerequisites
AT 332
This course prepares the entry-level athletic trainer with competencies related to psychosocial intervention and referral of patients exhibiting mental, emotional and psychological behavioral problems/issues. Students will develop skills to assist them in the recognition, intervention, counseling and referral. This course includes a minimum of 60 hours of scheduled clinical experience at a clinical site under the supervision of an approved preceptor.
Prerequisites
AT 319, or special permission by the Director of Athletic Training Education.
This course covers the underlying theory, basis for selection and application of therapeutic modalities used in the treatment of athletic injuries. This course includes a minimum of 60 hours of scheduled clinical experience at a clinical site under the supervision of an approved preceptor.
Prerequisites
AT 333, or special permission by the Director of Athletic Training Education.
This course provides the concepts to organize and administer an athletic training program for an entry-level athletic trainer. Topics include leadership theories, facility design, personnel management, legal issues, budget management, record keeping, and policy and procedure development. This course includes a minimum of 75 hours of scheduled clinical experience at a clinical site under the supervision of an approved preceptor.
Prerequisites
AT 360, or special permission by the Director of Athletic Training Education.
This course covers special topics not covered by current courses taught in the department. The particular topic is to be determined by the department according to the current need and interest. This course requires department chair approval.
This course covers the underlying theory, basis for selection and application of therapeutic exercise used in the treatment of athletic injuries. This course includes a minimum of 60 hours of scheduled clinical experience at a clinical site under the supervision of an approved preceptor.
Prerequisites
AT 408, or special permission by the Director of Athletic Training Education.
This course provides a foundation for evidence-based practice for the entry-level athletic trainer. The student will learn how to implement the basic principles of evidence-based practice, access electronic databases, differentiate between research methodologies, and begin to critically analyze pertinent literature. This course includes a minimum of 75 hours of scheduled clinical experience at a clinical site under the supervision of an approved preceptor.
Prerequisites
AT 455, or special permission by the Director of Athletic Training Education.
This course focuses on the professional development issues specific to the profession of athletic training. Preparation for the BOC certification examination will be included. This course includes a minimum of 75 hours of scheduled clinical experience at a clinical site under the supervision of an approved preceptor.
Prerequisites
AT 472, or special permission by the Director of Athletic Training Education.
This course focuses on the professional development issues specific to the profession of athletic training. Preparation for the BOC certification examination will be included. This course includes a minimum of 75 hours of scheduled clinical experience at a clinical site under the supervision of an approved preceptor.
Prerequisites
AT 455, EXSS 302

Biology

This course presents the basic concepts of biology; it is intended for non-science majors. Recommended to satisfy the general education requirement for science.
This course introduces students to fundamental concepts in biomolecular structure, cell biology, and genetics. This course is the first part of a two-course introductory biology sequence for majors in the biological sciences.
This course introduces students to fundamental concepts in evolution, systematics, and ecology. It will also introduce students to the diversity of life. This course is the second part of a two-course introductory biology sequence for majors in the biological sciences.
Prerequisites
BIO 135
This course provides students with a fundamental understanding of how the human body works at the molecular, cellular and organ levels, a well as with a practical knowledge of how important nutritional and dietary needs help to maintain healthy body function.
This course will introduce students to the theory of evolution by natural selection. Emphasis will be placed on examples of evolution observed in nature, in the lab and the breeding of domestic plants and animals. The course will also compare and contrast evolution with religious and philosophical perspectives.
This course introduces students to critical analysis of biological literature. Students will learn methods for carrying out scientific literature searches, reading biological literature and preparation of scientific writing. Additionally, the course will provide guidance for career preparation in the biological sciences.
Prerequisites
ENG 101, and Sophomore status.
This course examines the basic structure, taxonomy, growth, genetics and control of microorganisms, with emphasis on pathogenic species. The course concentrates on bacteria; however, fungi, protists, helminths and viruses also are discussed. The laboratory emphasizes aseptic technique, as well as common staining and biochemical testing procedures used in the identification of bacterial species. Recommended: CHEM 151
Prerequisites
BIO 135
This course is designed as an exploration of biological, physical and plant sciences of the local area.
This course surveys the animal phyla. The emphasis is on evolution and systematics, anatomy and physiology, as well as animal development.
Prerequisites
BIO 135
This course covers the theory and practice of economically reproducing plant materials, both sexually and asexually. Emphasis is placed on seed production, rooted cuttings, grafting, layering and tissue culture techniques.
Prerequisites
BIO 135
This course examines the taxonomy, anatomy, physiology, ecology and evolutionary biology of invertebrate animals.
Prerequisites
BIO 140 or BIO 220
This course surveys the phyla of photosynthetic organisms, as well as of some fungi. The emphasis is on angiosperm plant anatomy and development, as well as on organismal diversity and reproductive cycles.
Prerequisites
BIO 135
The content of special topics courses will vary each time a special topic is offered.
This course provides an introduction to the structure and function of the human body.
Prerequisites
BIO 135
This course examines the relationships between the structure and function of the human body. Topics covered include cells, tissues, integument, skeletal system, muscular system, nervous system and sensory organs. This course is the first part of a two-course sequence in anatomy and physiology.
Prerequisites
BIO 135
This course covers the structure and function of the endocrine system, circulatory system, respiratory system, digestive system, urinary system and reproductive systems. This course is the second part of a two-course sequence in anatomy and physiology.
Prerequisites
BIO 270
This course surveys the common plant species currently found in Iowa's natural areas. Emphasis will be placed on recognizing both native and introduced angiosperm species in woodlands, prairies, and wetland areas. Fieldwork will be required.
Prerequisites
BIO 140 or BIO 231
This course presents fundamental principles of classical genetics as well as an introduction to modern molecular genetics; emphasis will be placed on Mendelian genetics, linkage, gene expression and regulation, and mutation. The laboratory will emphasize the use of statistics and probability to generate and test genetic hypotheses, as well as provide an introduction to molecular genetic techniques and tools.
Prerequisites
BIO 135
Field and/or laboratory research in an area of biological sciences involving participation in the scientific process with a faculty member from the Department of Biological Sciences. Each participant will write a progress report at the end of each semester and be expected to maintain a detailed laboratory notebook. Students are expected to work (on average) a minimum of 3 hours per week over two sessions (one semester) for one hour of credit. The course may be repeated for a maximum of three credit hours if both student and faculty member agree. Prerequisite: Sophomore status and approval of the supervising faculty member along with project acceptance.
This course gives students first-hand exposure to the work environment in a specialized field of the health sciences, such as medicine, chiropractic medicine, physical therapy, pharmacy, dentistry, optometry, or veterinary medicine. It is conducted in an off-campus, independent study setting, where students observe or assist health care professionals in hospitals, clinics, or laboratories.
Prerequisites
BIO 303, and junior status
This course provides an introduction to evolutionary theory as well as a perspective on how scientists view evolutionary theory today by reading and discussing recently published books on the subject.
Prerequisites
Junior status
This course examines the taxonomy, anatomy, physiology, ecology and evolutionary biology of fish. The laboratory emphasizes identification of fish native to Iowa.
Prerequisites
BIO 140 or BIO 220
This course provides an in-depth understanding of the nutritional requirements of plants and the diagnosis of plant nutritional deficiencies and toxicities. The course will concentrate on the essential elements and their physiological role in plant growth and development. Soil nutrient availability, nutrient uptake and nutrient assimilation also will be discussed. Recommended: CHEM 115 or CHEM 151
Prerequisites
BIO 140 or BIO 231
This course examines functions that impact plant growth and development. Emphasis is placed on water relations, basic mineral nutrition, transport phenomena, photosynthesis, and hormone action. Recommended: CHEM 151
Prerequisites
BIO 140 or BIO 231
This course provides an extensive study of the structure and organization of vertebrate tissues. Emphasis is placed on the relationships between the structure and function of these tissues. The laboratory stresses identification of cell and tissue types.
Prerequisites
BIO 140 or BIO 220
This course examines the relationships between organisms and their environment, with practical applications to field biology. The course includes units that utilize techniques of ecological analysis.
Prerequisites
BIO 140 or BIO 220 or BIO 231
See description for BIO 335
This course provides a detailed study of the theories and processes of biological evolution.
Prerequisites
BIO 283, and one of the following: BIO 140 or BIO 220 or BIO 231
This course provides a detailed study of parasites, with emphasis on those infecting humans and domestic animals. The course covers life cycles, disease syndromes and host-parasite interactions. The laboratory emphasizes the identification of animal parasites.
Prerequisites
BIO 140 or BIO 220
This course provides a comprehensive examination of the biological, societal, ethical, economic, and political basis of modern conservation. This course is not only about discussing conservation problems, but also about applying quantitative methods in a rigorous scientific manner to identify solutions to these problems.
Prerequisites
BIO 335
This course involves the study of the abnormal functioning of diseased organs with application to medical procedures and patient care. This course examines the etiology, symptoms, pathogenesis, diagnosis and therapy of disease.
Prerequisites
BIO 140 or BIO 220 or BIO 268 or BIO 270
This course involves the microscopic study of diseased tissue, including preparation of sample tissue. Corequisite: BIO 370
This course covers humoral and cellular immunity. The topics include but are not limited to antibodies, membrane receptors for antigen, regulation of the immune response, and antigen-antibody interactions. Topics in applied immunology include hypersensitivity, tumor immunity, autoimmunity, transplant rejection and immunological tests.
Prerequisites
BIO 283
This course provides an in-depth overview of the living cell and highlights the molecular and biochemical aspects impacting cell structure and function. Emphasis is placed on the structure and function of various cellular organelles and membranes, along with their roles in metabolism, transport, and cell communication. Recommended CHEM 151
Prerequisites
BIO 283
This course introduces students to avian evolution, flight, anatomy, physiology, ecology, and conservation. In addition, students will actively survey birds in the field to conduct estimates of avian diversity and density.
Prerequisites
BIO 140 or BIO 220
This course will provide a conceptual understanding of many aspects of mammalian biology and will provide a detailed understanding of mammalian anatomy, diversity, and natural history (especially of local forms), as well as some of the techniques that mammalogists use to acquire such knowledge.
Prerequisites
BIO 140 or BIO 220
This course examines the taxonomy, anatomy, physiology, ecology and evolutionary biology of amphibians and reptiles.
Prerequisites
BIO 140 or BIO 220
In this lab-based course, students will learn modern molecular techniques for purification, modification and analysis of DNA. This includes genomic DNA extraction, plasmid purification, polymerase chain reaction, cloning, restriction digestion and DNA sequencing. The course serves as an introduction to DNA laboratory techniques that may be especially useful for students interested in pursuing careers in research or in attending graduate or professional school.
Prerequisites
Successful completion with a B+ or higher of BIO 135 or successful completion with a C or better of BIO 283 AND successful completion with a C or higher of CHEM 152, or permission of the instructor.
Practical and theoretical laboratory based training on current molecular tools and techniques used in the field of cell biology and protein research. Topics ranging from bacterial and eukaryotic cell culture, cloning and protein expression, to methods of protein purification and immunological detection will be covered. Students will be expected to read and analyze primary literature to help them solve problems within the laboratory.
Prerequisites
Successful completion (with a “C” or higher) of both BIO 283 and CHEM 152, or permission of the instructor.
Students will complete the literature review portion of their project under the supervision of a science faculty member. The literature review will culminate in the completion of a paper reviewed by the students’ project advisor. This course is the first part of a two-course capstone experience for several majors in the natural sciences.
Prerequisites
Junior status
This course describes the biology of cancer, including the molecular changes of cancer initiation and progression, the dysfunctional cellular and tissue processes that make cancer difficult to treat, and the clinical implications for cancer as a disease. This course is intended for upper-level students of biology and pre-professional interests. It builds significantly from concepts learned in Genetics and Cell and Molecular Biology.
Prerequisites
BIO 381
This course provides an in-depth overview of the principles underlying plant disease, including causes of disease, as well as the mechanisms of dissemination, pathogenicity, and control of disease. The course also will cover the disease cycle, the physiological effects of disease and the methods of plant defense against disease.
Prerequisites
BIO 140 or BIO 231
Wildlife management can range from protecting and conserving endangered species, to increasing the number of trophy game species, to controlling pest species. In this course we will discuss how the understanding of wildlife ecology, history, policy, public wants, and math help shape the decisions a wildlife manager makes in the real world.
Prerequisites
BIO 430, and MATH 105 or MATH 107
This course examines the philosophy of managing fish populations and introduces students to techniques used to manage various species and the ecosystems they inhabit.
Prerequisites
BIO 335, and MATH 105 or MATH 107
The content of special topics courses will vary each time a special topic is offered.
The protection of the wildlife resource (including threatened and endangered species and game species) is not possible without wildlife law enforcement. This course covers techniques for determining time of death, species identification, data collection and preservation of evidence for wildlife law enforcement cases, as well as advanced technologies available for identification and individualization of evidence. Fulfills an upper division Biology or Forensics Science elective.
Prerequisites
A 300-level biology laboratory course.
Stream ecology involves the study of streams, rivers and their watersheds. This course examines the physical environment of streams, the organisms occupying streams, and the interactions between these organisms and their environment. Corequisite: GEOG 356
Prerequisites
BIO 335
This course is an in-depth study of the insects emphasizing anatomy, physiology, ecology, evolution and taxonomy.
Prerequisites
BIO 140 or BIO 220
Students will complete an independent project under the supervision of a science faculty member. This will include a paper reviewed by the student’s project advisor and an oral presentation presented to the science faculty.
Prerequisites
Senior status
Students will complete an independent project under the supervision of a science faculty member. This will include a paper reviewed by the student’s project advisor and an oral presentation presented to the science faculty. This course is the second part of a two-course capstone experience for several majors in the natural sciences.
Prerequisites
BIO 398

Business Administration

A look at modern management theory, including both functional and behavioral approaches to the administration of business enterprises.
A study of the procedures involved in the accumulation, processing and dissemination of various types of information within an organization. Typical business problems will be solved from a management perspective, using popular spreadsheet and database software packages as problem-solving tools.
Prerequisites
BA 210
A course that seeks to recognize the distinctive set of problems encountered in the work environment, to study contrasting theories currently being used to make ethical decisions, and to apply those theories through examples and case studies.
This course is designed to examine in-depth current developments in specific areas of practice and research. Specific content of the course will change with each offering and will be announced prior to the session in which it is offered.
This course is designed for business students who have a good foundation in mathematics and algebra. Students will learn to apply descriptive statistics, probability and random variables, inferential statistics, sampling of business data, and time series within the business environment. Heavy emphasis will be on business applications utilizing Microsoft Excel and other business statistical packages.
Prerequisites
CS 102, recommended MATH 105 or permission of instructor
This course is designed to provide an introduction to legal and ethical issues within the business environment. Topics will include an introduction to the nature and sources of law, and the methods by which laws are made; basic principles of contract law and property law as the foundations for business enterprise; tort law governing business relationships. Students will also study the foundation of ethics and ethical theories currently being used in the business environment to make decisions, and will apply those theories through examples and case studies.
A survey of particular fields of law relevant to business operations; agency, partnerships, corporations; sales, commercial transactions, and bankruptcy; antitrust law; employment law; consumer protection.
Prerequisites
BA 302 recommended
Presents a cross-cultural perspective on managing global organizations. Focuses on understanding the influence of culture on international management, and how managers in multinational organizations address such issues as strategic analysis, organizational structure, global coordination and control, communications, inter-organizational cooperation, and human resource management.
Prerequisites
BA 210, and general education cultures requirement
This course focuses on the process of creating a startup, from the recognition of an opportunity to the launch of the business. It is designed to help students learn how to do the pre-launch activities necessary to start a business and secure its first customer.
Prerequisites
MKT 208, BA 210
Social Entrepreneurs apply entrepreneurial talent to create social value and innovative sustainable solutions to pressing societal challenges. Students will identify opportunities, develop unique solutions, secure scarce resources, and manage risk. Social entrepreneurship will be studied in the context of civil society where there is inherent tension between market forces and democratic citizenship principles.
Prerequisites
ECON 160, BA 210
Explores non-speculative risks in business and selected management devices for dealing with them; assumption, avoidance, transfer and reduction of risk; risk management decision; control of risk and reduction of losses; case studies in risk management.
This course is designed for business students who have a good foundation in mathematics, algebra and statistics. Topics will include inventory management and business simulation. This course will be case-driven as part of the learning process.
Prerequisites
BA 256 or MATH 220 or instructor approval.
An overview of the policies and procedures in personnel administration in American business, including uses, sources, motivation and maintenance of employees, with major emphasis on the dynamics of social organization.
Prerequisites
BA 210
A detailed examination of the fundamental concepts, principles and dynamics of the supervisory process.
Prerequisites
BA 210, BA 361
This course examines and contrasts process theories, relationship theories, and management theories of leadership. Various definitions of leadership and their underlying implications for application and research will be investigated. The role of the leader will be examined in relation to the various leadership theories and definitions.
Prerequisites
BA 210, and BA 361 or permission of instructor
Provides insight into the impact of culture on concepts of leadership, values, expectations, and patterns of communication. Examines how sensitivity to cultural differences can contribute to leadership effectiveness and explores strategies for effectively communicating and negotiating with individuals from other cultures.
Prerequisites
BA 317
A presentation of the organization and operation of small enterprises in services, retailing, wholesaling and manufacturing for those aspiring to own, operate, and/or manage a small business or to work for an organization serving small businesses. Topics covered include importance, status, problems and requirements of small businesses.
Prerequisites
BA 210
This course involves the evaluation and study of trends in human resource training, education and development activities within organizational settings.
Prerequisites
BA 361
Application of writing skills specifically for business managers includes annual reports; routine, persuasive and special messages; proposals; and brochures. This course places written and oral business communication within the context of general communication processes and familiarizes learners with recent technological advances. Strategy for effective writing is emphasized by engaging in a variety of business writing tasks.
Prerequisites
ENG 102
Fundamental concepts of compensation theory, government and union influences, job analysis and evaluation, building and maintaining compensation structure, comparable worth, performance and salaries.
Prerequisites
BA 361
An exploration of the structural and functional characteristics of formal organizations such as corporations, government agencies, schools, etc. Special attention will be given to such topics as: theories of management from Taylor to Theory Z; the relations between the internal structure of organizations and the different forms of social stratification throughout American society–i.e. class, racial, ethnic, and gender stratification systems; and the new forms of management strategy in the global economy.
Prerequisites
SOC 110
Policies, procedures and problems in the selection of personnel, focusing on job analysis, validation, legal constraints, criteria and application of specific techniques.
Prerequisites
BA 361
The basic principles of manpower use, wage structure, use of industrial psychology and collective bargaining, the union movement, human relations in industrial management, and modern labor laws and institutions.
Prerequisites
BA 210, BA 361
Students will learn how to assess a culture to determine underlying assumptions regarding: social interaction, economic interests, legal requirements, and political realities. Students will then understand how these, in turn, affect expectations, outcomes, behavior, thoughts, and priorities. The course emphasizes negotiating deals, resolving disputes or making decisions in a multicultural environment.
Prerequisites
BA 317, and BA 367 or permission of instructor
Production and operations management is designed to provide students with an in-depth look at the components of organizational operations and how they are managed. Successful management incorporates theories and practices that apply to a variety of operational areas involving factory and service operations, inventory management, quality management, capacity planning, supply chain management, aggregate planning, and project management. Elements of shop floor control, status reporting systems, facilities design, cost estimating, inventory control, procurement, quality assurance, forecasting, labor loading, scheduling, and productivity measurement will be explored. Important tools of production and operations management that will be covered include Theory of Constraints, MRP, MRPII, CAD/CAM, CIM, JIT, SPC, and TQM.
Prerequisites
BA 210, and BA 256 or MATH 220
This course description may change each session it is offered to cover the most contemporary management issues.
Prerequisites
BA 210
Through case studies and discussion learners explore governmental emergency management and private sector crisis management in the context of fundamental concepts such as crisis management, disaster recovery, organizational continuity, and vulnerability and risk analyses. Learners will gain practice with tools including business area impact analysis, and explore risk management and loss control strategies. Learners will explore the characteristics of realistic and effective contingency, response, business recovery, and crisis management plans and discuss the purpose, value, and types of exercises and training needed to support an effective crisis management, disaster recovery, and organizational continuity program.
Prerequisites
BA 210, PA 306
This course is designed to examine in-depth current developments in specific areas of practice and research. Specific content of the course will change with each offering and will be announced prior to the session in which it is offered.
A study of the current strategies and techniques of administration and management, including: business objectives; policies, functions, executive leadership and organizational structure; control standards; case studies in organization, financing and operations.
Prerequisites
BA 361, BA 423, and completion of all management-business core requirements.
This course provides an in-depth exposure to strategic planning for marketing, using cases as illustrative examples. Emphasis is placed on extensive situation analysis, objective and criterion formulation, and alternative selection and implementation.
Prerequisites
Completion of all marketing/business core requirements.
This course applies learning experiences in the global economy. Countries around the globe are major players along with specific regions in the U.S. Understanding the dynamics a certain country/region plans will help students as they go forth in their chosen career(s). Destination of study travel course may change each time the course is offered.
Prerequisites
ECON 160, or approval of the instructor
The course is a culminating experience for students completing majors in business. Upon the successful completion of the course, students will have a practical knowledge of strategic application in the activities, procedures, and techniques unique to business operations.
Prerequisites
Senior standing and within 9 credit hours of program completion.
This course encourages students to describe and analyze the way that people behave in organizations by applying theories of organizational behavior. The course consists of a balance among theory and application.
Prerequisites
PSY 190 or SOC 110
This course will examine strategy and economic systems to manage risk and assess the impact of economic changes including regionalism, government regulations, corporate governance, international fiscal and monetary policies, and the balance of payments for strategy development.
This course will examine ethical theories and styles in contemporary organizational decision making, examining the ethics of current regulatory and legal issues impacting organizations.
This course will include the investigation of leadership theories and explore the role of leadership in organizations. The course will also focus on the characteristics of leadership and the implications leadership has for organizations. Same as PA 509.
This course synthesizes the responsibility of an organization as a leader in supporting global sustainability and integration of sustainability through entrepreneurial innovation and opportunities using industry analysis, competitive leverage, funding strategies, etc. within the organization.
This course provides a detailed review of the principles and methods for training and developing human resources in a work environment. Learning theory and principles of effective training provide the foundation, but the emphasis is on applied delivery including training and presentation skills. Methods for analyzing training and development needs and the principles and techniques of program evaluation are also emphasized. Development of a training proposal is a key element. This course provides "hands-on" experience in designing and implementing training programs.
This is a survey course of the issues presented to managers in the international environment. Students explore a variety of topics utilizing discussion, researched reports and case analysis. Students will explore issues including the nature of international business, the external environment of international business, strategy and planning, marketing, trade practices, human resources management, financial management, and operations management in an international environment. Students also explore the ethical considerations faced by international managers in decision making.
An analysis of the U.S. and foreign laws governing international trade.
An investigation of the National Labor Relations Act and its implications to businesses. Labor legislation, labor unions and collective bargaining are topics to explore.
This course provides an overview of the major principles of organization and management, in an integrated context. Frameworks for the analysis of managerial problems and decisions will be explored. Starting with basic organization theory and concluding with theories of micro-level processes, this course will introduce the different lenses with which to view behavioral processes within and between organizations. Special emphasis on issues of managing in a global business environment, the changing nature of governance, shareholder and stakeholder rights, multiculturalism in organizations, organizational power and domination and alternative organizational forms will be woven throughout.
This course is an intensive study of business in a specific country/region of the world. The course is a combination of classroom lectures and site visits to businesses. Classroom lectures and site visits provide students the basis to study the impact of economic, social, financial, infrastructure, and international elements on business. Destination of study travel course may change each time course if offered. The course will be conducted in English.
A study of the design and functioning of the entire compensation system with emphasis on wage and salary determination, individual group incentives, employee benefits, and non-economic rewards.
An exploration of the principles and practices required to forecast and acquire the human resources necessary to implement operational and strategic plans in organizations. Students will develop a plan for a specific project. Topics can include compensation, motivation and quality of work life.
This seminar is designed to examine in-depth current developments in specific areas of practice and research. Specific content of the seminar will change with each offering and will be announced prior to the term in which it is offered.
An explanation of the core values and behavioral science theories that have shaped the field and defined the practice for organizational development and a prerequisite to understanding collaborative processes for managing planned change. Students are familiarized with the intellectual legacies of the major theorists and practitioners that have influenced the evolution of organization development as well as the traditional organizational development concepts, models and interventions. Contemporary practices and future trends in the field are also examined.
This course focuses on managing the informal organization, individual idiosyncrasies, the organization as a social systm, and organization politics. The course reviews various models of organizational culture, including origins and purposes, how to establish and nourish a business-supporting culture, culture audits, and culture change.
This course utilizes the conceptual foundations acquired in Organizational Development and Organizational Culture as a basis for analyzing and diagnosing organizational performance and designing appropriate interventions. A primary focus is on understanding and applying organizational functioning, and becoming familiarized with different interventions and organizational development technologies. Heavy emphasis is placed on applying various diagnostic models. Both in-class case analysis of organizations and outside projects which require learners to conduct a diagnosis and assessment in an organizational setting are used to facilitate the acquisition of diagnostic competence.
Continuous Quality Improvement (CQI) will be examined both as a concept and a process. The course material includes how CQI applies to organizations from all sectors, the new emerging paradigms that are respresentd by CQI, a focus on customers, an understanding of variation, the needed cultural change for a successful CQI implementation, as well as case studies. Emphasis will be placed on practical application of CQI concepts as they apply to organizations.
This course is designed to give the student an understanding of the requirements for the effective implementation of a quality system in an organization. Emphasis will be given to the practical application of implementation strategies and processes.
Prerequisites
BA 561
This course focuses on the concepts of continuous improvement and quality management, viewing quality as a systematic process that improves customer satisfaction. The course covers methods and technologies that will aid managers in assuring that the organization's quality system is effectively meeting the organization's continuous improvement goals.
This course will illustrate how teams benefit organizations and analyze how teams function. The student will obtain and analyze techniques used to improve group dynamics and obtain skills in how to facilitate an effective meeting.
This course introduces students to the concept of the supply chain management with a focus on the issues of the global business environment. Topics covered include the sets of business processes called "channels," channel integration, management functions of planning, organizing, and controlling, and collaboration. The context of the supply chain in today's world is treated as highly significant and issues of culture and globalization will be addressed throughout the course.
Students will explore and apply the essential theories of strategic management and operations concepts employed by best-practice companies in the transnational, international and global environments. Students will examine critical success factors in establishing and operating businesses in the global environment, including companies and their environments and the various external and internal issues not normally faced when operating solely in the domestic environment.
The emphasis serves to integrate the student's studies in Business Administration by examining in depth an issue or problem of significance and special interest to the student. Research, writing, and presentation skills are employed in this course. Each student will design his/her own project, subject to approval of the faculty member, in order to fulfill the course requirements. The project shall demonstrate (1) integration of the MBA program objectives, (2) graduate-level writing skills using APA format, (3) graduate level critical thinking skills, and (4) in-depth understanding and application of the objectives of the area of emphasis utilizing appropriate research techniques. A PowerPoint™ presentation of the project, suitable for senior-level decision makers, is also required.
Prerequisites
All core requirements and only 6 required credit hours or less remaining in the program.

Chemistry

This course introduces students to the dynamic field of forensic science. Basic procedures for processing crime scenes are discussed. Emphasis is placed on the science behind collection, preservation and analysis of physical evidence. Topics include: physical properties of glass and soil; organic and inorganic analysis; microscopy; hairs, fibers and paint; drugs; arson and explosion investigations; firearms, tool marks and other impressions; serology; fingerprints; and DNA.
This course will expose students to laboratory exercises that will enhance their understanding of the fundamental principles learned in CHEM 102. Prerequisite/Corequisite: CHEM 102.
This course offers an introduction to chemical concepts through the examination of environmental issues. Students will gain an understanding of chemistry as it pertains to environmental topics and will be better equipped as citizens to make decisions using evidence-based reasoning.
This course offers an introduction to chemical concepts through the examination of real life processes. Everyday items of interest are explored to determine their underlying chemical principles. Students will gain an appreciation for chemistry in their daily lives and will be better equipped as citizens to formulate opinions and make decisions about items of scientific interest. Non-laboratory.
This course correlates with CHEM 140 by giving students hands-on experience with many of the laboratory techniques used to analyze the compounds discussed in CHEM 140. Corequisite: CHEM 140
This course introduces students to fundamental concepts in chemistry by taking an atoms first approach. Atomic structure is introduced early and is used as the basis for discussion of periodic trends of the elements, compounds and bonding, and chemical reactions. Laboratory experiments correlate with lecture material.
Prerequisites
MATH 105 or a strong high school math background
This course is a continuation of the atoms first approach begun in CHEM 151. Emphasis is placed on thermochemistry, gases, solutions, thermodynamics, equilibrium, acids and bases, and kinetics
Prerequisites
CHEM 151
This course introduces students to critical analysis of biological literature. Students will learn methods for carrying out scientific literature searches, reading biological literature and preparation of scientific writing. Additionally, the course will provide guidance for career preparation in the biological sciences. Same as BIO 201.
Prerequisites
ENG 101, And Sophomore status
This course teaches the application of equilibrium, solubility, neutralization, oxidation-reduction, complexation, and acid-bas theories to quantitative chemical analysis. The application of chromatography and spectrophotometry to quantitative determinations is also investigated. The laboratory emphasizes gravimetric, volumetric, chromatographic, and spectrophotometric methods of analysis.
Prerequisites
CHEM 152
The content of special topics courses will vary each time a special topic is offered.
A course covering structure and reactivity of alkanes, alkenes, alkynes, and alkyl halides with an emphasis on mechanisms and stereochemistry. Laboratory emphasizes basic procedures and techniques.
Prerequisites
CHEM 152, or consent of the instructor.
A continuation of CHEM 251, with emphasis on the chemistry of various functional groups; also provides an introduction to aromaticity and organic spectroscopic techniques. Laboratory correlates with lecture material and emphasizes methods of qualitative organic analysis.
Prerequisites
CHEM 251
A study of basic chemical thermodynamics, chemical kinetics, and equilibrium. Lecture concepts will be applied to solids, liquids, and gases and to chemical reactions occurring in the gas phase and in solutions.
Prerequisites
CHEM 252, PHY 113, MATH 215
A study of basic concepts of quantum chemistry and statistical mechanics/statistical thermodynamics and their application to molecular structure, chemical change, and some fundamental chemical spectroscopies.
Prerequisites
CHEM 252, PHY 113, MATH 215
Field and/or laboratory research in an area of chemical sciences involving participation in the scientific process with a faculty member from the Department of Biology and Chemistry. Each participant will write a progress report at the end of each semester and be expected to maintain a detailed laboratory/field notebook. Students are expected to work on their research (on average) a minimum of 3 hours per week over two sessions (one semester) for one hour of credit. The course may be repeated for a maximum of three credit hours if both student and faculty member agree.
Prerequisites
CHEM 152, and sophomore status and approval of the supervising faculty member along with project acceptance.
This course covers an overview of chemical instrumentation and its applications in the forensic lab. This course includes a review of the chemical tests for fingerprints, gunshot residue and trace evidence, as well as the chemistry of drugs, arson and explosives, and chemical instrumental analysis of drugs, toxicological specimens, arson, explosives and questioned documents.
Prerequisites
CHEM 252
This course is an introduction to major biomolecules. Topics include basic thermodynamics, aqueous solutions, structure and properties of amino acids, proteins and protein structure, enzymes and enzyme kinetics, structure and function of carbohydrates, nucleotides and nucleic acids, lipids and membranes. Recommended: BIO 135
Prerequisites
CHEM 251
This course is an introduction to bioenergetics and metabolism. Discussion will focus on the degradation and biosynthesis of carbohydrates, lipids, amino acids and nucleotides.
Prerequisites
CHEM 330
This course provides a hands-on laboratory experience using basic biochemical techniques, such as spectrophotometry, chromatography and electrophoresis. These techniques will be used to study major types of biomolecules, such as amino acids, proteins, carbohydrates, lipids and RNA. Corequisite: CHEM 330
This course targets several instruments common to modern chemistry laboratories with study of the theory underlying each instrumental technique. Covered are atomic absorption spectrophotometry, ultraviolet/visible spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, infrared and Raman spectroscopies, gas and liquid chromatographies, and mass spectrometry. Attention will be given to spectral interpretation.
Prerequisites
CHEM 252
A consideration of periodicity, atomic structure, and chemical bonding of main group elements and transition metals. Topics may include molecular symmetry, structures of solids, acid-base definitions and applications, coordination chemistry, organometallic chemistry, and bioinorganic chemistry.
Prerequisites
CHEM 252
A course emphasizing the development of a written proposal for research on a selected project in chemistry. Literature search techniques and the proposal format are covered with the aim of undertaking a thorough review of the chemical literature in the preparation of the research proposal.
Prerequisites
Junior standing and consent of the instructor
This course is a survey of the fundamental aspects of organometallic chemistry. Topics include structure and bonding, synthesis and reactions of main group and transition metal organometallics. Applications of organometallics to organic synthesis and homogeneous catalysis will also be discussed. Whenever possible, reactivity patterns will be organized according to general periodic trends.
Prerequisites
CHEM 361
This course covers, at an advanced level, topics not considered in either CHEM 251 or CHEM 252. It also expands upon some topics covered in both CHEM 251 and CHEM 252. The emphasis is on modern synthetic chemistry and applications to chemical systems of interest.
Prerequisites
CHEM 252
This course covers the chemistry of both aromatic and non-aromatic heterocyclic compounds. Topics include the synthesis, reactions, and properties of three- to seven-membered cyclic compounds containing one or more heteroatoms. The nomenclature of heteroatomic ring systems will also be introduced.
Prerequisites
CHEM 252
The content of special topics courses will vary each time a special topic is offered.
An in-depth study of modern techniques in molecular spectroscopy. Topics will include mass spectrometry, raman spectroscopy, infrared spectroscopy and several methods in nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, including multinuclear and multidimensional techniques.
Prerequisites
CHEM 252
A continuation of CHEM 391 in which the proposed chemical research is carried out in the laboratory. A written report will be prepared and an oral presentation will be given at the conclusion of the project.
Prerequisites
CHEM 391

Communications

Introduction to Mass Media provides students an overview of the history and function of journalism and news media in a democratic society. Students study the history of mass media in the U.S. and gain knowledge of techniques in newsgathering and reporting, AP style, photojournalism, page design, and roles played in a 21st century newsroom. Students will gain hands-on skills covering news and sporting events on-campus and are encouraged to contribute to The Collegian student newspaper.
This course increases the ability of students to make effective speeches and includes speech organization, presentation and extemporaneous talks.
An introduction to communication studies providing an overview of communication theory with emphasis on information transmission and social influence functions of communication behavior in personal and mediated contexts. Course content focuses on the identification of communication goals, types of messages, and behaviors.
Practical guided workshop in the preparation, design and production of printed media. Students produce the campus newspaper or they may be assigned to other campus publications. Note: A maximum of eight credits may be earned for this workshop.
Practical guided workshop in the preparation, design and production of printed media. Students produce the campus newspaper or they may be assigned to other campus publications. Note: A maximum of eight credits may be earned for this workshop.
Practical guided workshop in the preparation, design and production of printed media. Students produce the campus newspaper or they may be assigned to other campus publications. Note: A maximum of eight credits may be earned for this workshop.
Practical guided workshop in the preparation, design and production of printed media. Students produce the campus newspaper or they may be assigned to other campus publications. Note: A maximum of eight credits may be earned for this workshop.
Practical guided workshop in the preparation, design, and production of the KPCK internet campus radio. Students produce the campus radio broadcast via the online platform. Note: A maximum of eight credits may be earned for this workshop.
Practical guided workshop in the preparation, design, and production of the KPCK internet campus radio. Students produce the campus radio broadcast via the online platform. Note: A maximum of eight credits may be earned for this workshop.
Practical guided workshop in the preparation, design, and production of the KPCK internet campus radio. Students produce the campus radio broadcast via the online platform. Note: A maximum of eight credits may be earned for this workshop.
Practical guided workshop in the preparation, design, and production of the KPCK internet campus radio. Students produce the campus radio broadcast via the online platform. Note: A maximum of eight credits may be earned for this workshop.
Practical guided workshop in the preparation, design, and production of television media. Students produce the campus television broadcast via KPCK’s YouTube channel. Note: A maximum of eight credits may be earned for this workshop.
Practical guided workshop in the preparation, design, and production of television media. Students produce the campus television broadcast via KPCK’s YouTube channel. Note: A maximum of eight credits may be earned in this workshop.
Practical guided workshop in the preparation, design, and production of television media. Students produce the campus television broadcast via KPCK’s YouTube channel. Note: A maximum of eight credits may be earned in this workshop.
Practical guided workshop in the preparation, design, and production of television media. Students produce the campus television broadcast via KPCK’s YouTube channel. Note: A maximum of eight credits may be earned in this workshop.
Interpersonal Communication provides an introduction to communication between individuals. Course content focuses on the identification and evaluation of communication goals, messages, and behaviors of individuals and groups.
A survey of theories in the field of human communication. Consideration is given to theories that explain communication behavior between pairs of people, within groups, in organizations, and in societies. Course content focuses on the identification of various theories and the development of support messages appropriate for a prescribed research problem or medium.
Study of interviewing principles for people-management skills. Students have the opportunity to practice techniques appropriate for the following types of interviews: employment, media, orientation, goal-setting, problem-solving, appraisal and persuasion or selling.
Analysis of how culture interacts with communication and an examination of problems encountered when communicating across cultures. Distinctions among verbal and nonverbal code systems are examined. Students get the chance to experience presentations from members of other cultures.
Practical guided workshop in the preparation, design and production of printed media. Students produce the campus newspaper or they may be assigned to other campus publications. Note: A maximum of eight credits may be earned for this workshop.
Practical guided workshop in the preparation, design and production of printed media. Students produce the campus newspaper or they may be assigned to other campus publications. Note: A maximum of eight credits may be earned for this workshop.
Practical guided workshop in the preparation, design and production of printed media. Students produce the campus newspaper or they may be assigned to other campus publications. Note: A maximum of eight credits may be earned for this workshop.
Practical guided workshop in the preparation, design and production of printed media. Students produce the campus newspaper or they may be assigned to other campus publications. Note: A maximum of eight credits may be earned for this workshop.
Special Topics courses are studies of selected problems, periods or movements in the subject area not otherwise included in the curriculum. They are typically chosen from a faculty member’s particular expertise and field of scholarly inquiry, and offered to a student or group of students forming an interest in the particular subject matter. The 250 designation denotes a General Education level of instruction and may include an appropriate General Education task to be completed. The 450 designation denotes a senior level degree of sophistication expected in both learning and instruction. A single course may be offered at both levels simultaneously, in which case the syllabus will clearly differentiate the course expectations and assessment measures for students enrolled at each of the two levels. A Special Topics course must be approved by the School of Arts and Sciences Curriculum Committee before it is offered, and it must address one or more Major Outcomes within the discipline.
Practical guided workshop in the preparation, design, and production of the KPCK internet campus radio. Students produce the campus radio broadcast via the online platform. Note: A maximum of eight credits may be earned for this workshop.
Practical guided workshop in the preparation, design, and production of the KPCK internet campus radio. Students produce the campus radio broadcast via the online platform. Note: A maximum of eight credits may be earned for this workshop.
Practical guided workshop in the preparation, design, and production of the KPCK internet campus radio. Students produce the campus radio broadcast via the online platform. Note: A maximum of eight credits may be earned in this workshop.
Practical guided workshop in the preparation, design, and production of the KPCK internet campus radio. Students produce the campus radio broadcast via the online platform. Note: A maximum of eight credits may be earned in this workshop.
Practical guided workshop in the preparation, design, and production of television media. Students produce the campus television broadcast via KPCK’s YouTube channel. Note: A maximum of eight credits may be earned in this workshop.
Practical guided workshop in the preparation, design, and production of television media. Students produce the campus television broadcast via KPCK’s YouTube channel. Note: A maximum of eight credits may be earned in this workshop.
Practical guided workshop in the preparation, design, and production of television media. Students produce the campus television broadcast via KPCK’s YouTube channel. Note: A maximum of eight credits may be earned in this workshop.
Practical guided workshop in the preparation, design, and production of television media. Students produce the campus television broadcast via KPCK’s YouTube channel. Note: A maximum of eight credits may be earned in this workshop.
Study of television programs programming from the "Golden Age" to the present. Analysis of television's relation to post-modern American literature, culture and aesthetics. Same as ENG 275.
Introduction to television production, broadcast conventions and editing formats. Students learn writing for television, basic videography and editing. Students complete individual portfolios of original work that meet professional standards.
Student introduction to radio: production, concepts, techniques, and broadcasting. Students will have hands-on experience in writing for radio, commercial scriptwriting, broadcast interviewing, on-air personality, and production. Students complete individual portfolios of original work that meet professional standards.
An introduction to narrative fiction films, using concepts of art, theatre and literature and including a study of film aesthetics from a historical perspective. Same as ENG 290.
Theory of communication practices within the organization including communication channels, patterns and problems occurring in today’s organizations. The course examines how organizations operate, the roles of individual organization members, and the relationship between communication and organizational effectiveness.
Prerequisites
COMM 105
Oral and written communication skills for those involved in professional and business settings. Includes resume, cover letter, and memo writing; interpersonal and group applications; interviewing and professional presentations.
Prerequisites
COMM 105
This course provides a brief exploration of the history of sports journalism – print and broadcast – and on the state of these fields today, including the role of sports communication in contemporary cultures and social media. Using AP style, students learn to write for sports news, features, editorials, blogs, and social media, resulting in a course portfolio. Also included is writing for deadlines, mastering sports stats for news articles, and the role of ethics in sports journalism.
Prerequisites
COMM 102
This course provides instruction in feature writing and the various techniques for in-depth reporting. Students practice developing ideas, targeting stories for specific audiences, reporting with description and narration provided by research, interviewing and observation. Students complete individual portfolios of original work that meet professional standards.
Prerequisites
COMM 102
Students learn to identify and evaluate various styles of writing and practice professional conventions of copy editing for print and digital media.
Students will engage with concepts and methods of new and emerging media trends and technology through a critical/cultural communication theory lens. Students will conceive and create personal multimedia projects using emergent media and will experiment with cutting edge approaches to mediated mass communication both inside and outside the professional media sphere.
Teaches and develops skills for reporting and writing in a professional media environment. Students complete individual portfolios of original stories in news, sports, and public relations formats for print, broadcast, and digital media.
Prerequisites
COMM 102
Public relations is a detailed introduction to the historical, practical, and ethical concepts in the PR field. Students will learn the various roles of a public relations practitioner with the utilization of case studies and hands-on experience. Crisis management tactics, handling different key public relationships, and integrated marketing communications will be addressed.
Prerequisites
COMM 105 or COMM 200
Practical guided workshop in the preparation, design and production of printed media. Students produce the campus newspaper or they may be assigned to other campus publications. Note: A maximum of eight credits may be earned for this workshop.
Practical guided workshop in the preparation, design and production of printed media. Students produce the campus newspaper or they may be assigned to other campus publications. Note: A maximum of eight credits may be earned for this workshop.
Practical guided workshop in the preparation, design and production of printed media. Students produce the campus newspaper or they may be assigned to other campus publications. Note: A maximum of eight credits may be earned for this workshop.
Practical guided workshop in the preparation, design and production of printed media. Students produce the campus newspaper or they may be assigned to other campus publications. Note: A maximum of eight credits may be earned for this workshop.
This course traces the development of rhetorical theory from its origins in Classical Greece. By investigating how rhetoric and persuasion were viewed in the context of law, politics, display, language, and knowledge, it provides a wide context to understand the relationship between rhetoric and civilization. This understanding is not valuable for its own sake; however, it is valuable only to the extent that it applies to modern problems. Hence, classical theories will be used to interpret modern artifacts and students will learn to see the continuities between classical rhetoric and contemporary public life.
Prerequisites
COMM 105
Practical guided workshop in the preparation, design, and production of the KPCK internet campus radio. Students produce the campus radio broadcast via the online platform. Note: A maximum of eight credits may be earned in this workshop.
Practical guided workshop in the preparation, design, and production of the KPCK internet campus radio. Students produce the campus radio broadcast via the online platform. Note: A maximum of eight credits may be earned in this workshop.
Practical guided workshop in the preparation, design, and production of the KPCK internet campus radio. Students produce the campus radio broadcast via the online platform. Note: A maximum of eight credits may be earned in this workshop.
Practical guided workshop in the preparation, design, and production of the KPCK internet campus radio. Students produce the campus radio broadcast via the online platform. Note: A maximum of eight credits may be earned in this workshop.
Practical guided workshop in the preparation, design, and production of television media. Students produce the campus television broadcast via KPCK’s YouTube channel. Note: A maximum of eight credits may be earned in this workshop.
Practical guided workshop in the preparation, design, and production of television media. Students produce the campus television broadcast via KPCK’s YouTube channel. Note: A maximum of eight credits may be earned in this workshop.
Practical guided workshop in the preparation, design, and production of television media. Students produce the campus television broadcast via KPCK’s YouTube channel. Note: A maximum of eight credits may be earned in this workshop.
Practical guided workshop in the preparation, design, and production of television media. Students produce the campus television broadcast via KPCK’s YouTube channel. Note: A maximum of eight credits may be earned in this workshop.
Provides an overview of the concepts, methods, and tools by which communication research is designed, conducted, interpreted, and critically evaluated. Course content focuses on the analysis of various communication theories, sources, styles of writing, and adaptation of messages and writing styles suitable in professional research contexts or media.
Prerequisites
COMM 105, and Junior Standing.
Freedoms and responsibilities of mass media practitioners and institutions, explored within the framework of ethical theory. Consideration of values, codes of ethics, moral development, professionalism, institutional constraints, etc. as applied to media.
Prerequisites
Junior Standing or consent of the instructor
Practical guided workshop in the preparation, design and production of printed media. Students produce the campus newspaper or they may be assigned to other campus publications. Note: A maximum of eight credits may be earned for this workshop.
Practical guided workshop in the preparation, design and production of printed media. Students produce the campus newspaper or they may be assigned to other campus publications. Note: A maximum of eight credits may be earned for this workshop.
Practical guided workshop in the preparation, design and production of printed media. Students produce the campus newspaper or they may be assigned to other campus publications. Note: A maximum of eight credits may be earned for this workshop.
Practical guided workshop in the preparation, design and production of printed media. Students produce the campus newspaper or they may be assigned to other campus publications. Note: A maximum of eight credits may be earned for this workshop.
Special Topics courses are studies of selected problems, periods or movements in the subject area not otherwise included in the curriculum. They are typically chosen from a faculty member’s particular expertise and field of scholarly inquiry, and offered to a student or group of students forming an interest in the particular subject matter. The 250 designation denotes a General Education level of instruction and may include an appropriate General Education task to be completed. The 450 designation denotes a senior level degree of sophistication expected in both learning and instruction. A single course may be offered at both levels simultaneously, in which case the syllabus will clearly differentiate the course expectations and assessment measures for students enrolled at each of the two levels. A Special Topics course must be approved by the School of Arts and Sciences Curriculum Committee before it is offered, and it must address one or more Major Outcomes within the discipline.
Practical guided workshop in the preparation, design, and production of the KPCK internet campus radio. Students produce the campus radio broadcast via the online platform. Note: A maximum of eight credits may be earned for this workshop.
Practical guided workshop in the preparation, design, and production of the KPCK internet campus radio. Students produce the campus radio broadcast via the online platform. Note: A maximum of eight credits may earned for this workshop.
Practical guided workshop in the preparation, design, and production of the KPCK internet campus radio. Students produce the campus radio broadcast via the online platform. Note: A maximum of eight credits may be earned for this workshop.
Practical guided workshop in the preparation, design, and production of the KPCK internet campus radio. Students produce the campus radio broadcast via the online platform. Note: A maximum of eight credits may be earned for this workshop.
Practical guided workshop in the preparation, design, and production of television media. Students produce the campus television broadcast via KPCK’s YouTube channel. Note: A maximum of eight credits may be earned in this workshop.
Practical guided workshop in the preparation, design, and production of television media. Students produce the campus television broadcast via KPCK’s YouTube channel. Note: A maximum of eight credits may be earned in this workshop.
Practical guided workshop in the preparation, design, and production of television media. Students produce the campus television broadcast via KPCK’s YouTube channel. Note: A maximum of eight credits may be earned in this workshop.
Practical guided workshop in the preparation, design, and production of television media. Students produce the campus television broadcast via KPCK’s YouTube channel. Note: A maximum of eight credits may be earned in this workshop.
Senior Seminar provides in-depth study and research on individually selected topics. The seminar and students’ research projects build upon work begun in COMM 390 Research Methods in Communication.
Prerequisites
COMM 390

Computer Science

This course is an introduction into the computer applications and technology and their social implications. The course covers popular applications for personal and business use, including: Office Suite, image, audio, web, backup and security applications. The course also covers the foundational technologies enabling these applications, including hardware, software, and communications devices. This course meets the general education requirement in computer skills.
This course is an introduction to IT infrastructure for students with majors in the Organizational information Systems and Technology Program (OISTP).The course covers systems architecture and communication networks with an overall focus on the services and capabilities that IT infrastructure solutions provide in an organizational context. The course also covers the operational concerns with security, budgets and the environment.
Prerequisites
CS 102
This course is an introduction to contemporary information systems and how these systems are used throughout various organizations. The focus of this course will be on the key components of information systems - people, software, hardware, data, and communication technologies, and how these components can be integrated and managed to create competitive advantage. This course also provides an introduction to systems and development concepts, technology acquisition, and various types of application software that have become prevalent or are emerging in modern organizations and society.
Prerequisites
CS 102
This course is an introduction to the fundamental concepts of procedural programing. The course provides the evolution of programing and the role of different programing paradigms. The course will also provide the basics of problem decomposition, design of programmatic solutions and implementation of the code to automate the solutions. Course topics include data types, control structures, functions, arrays, 10, and the mechanics of running, testing, and debugging programs.
Prerequisites
CS 122 or [(CS102 or EDU 252) and (MATH 115-220)]
This course introduces students to the organization and architecture of computer systems. The student will learn the basics of representing data and logical manipulation of data in a digital computer. The student will learn the details of the fundamental components of the computer systems and the standard von Neumann model including: the CPU, memory, and internal and external communication devices. The student will gain the ability to make decisions regarding the choice of the architecture needed to meet the user’s requirements. The course will also cover truth tables and logic (Sentinel, Predicate and Propositional).
Prerequisites
CS 122, and MATH 115-220
This course is an introduction to the fundamentals of operating systems together with the basics of networking and communications. The course covers the key components that make up an operating system and the tasks involved in installing, configuring, administrating, updating, managing and securing an OS. The course will also include performance analysis and integration tasks. This course also includes the mathematical foundations behind queuing theory, mathematical modeling and cost benefit analysis.
Prerequisites
CS 140, CS 206, MATH 115
This course is an introduction to the core concepts in data and information management. The course covers identifying organizational information requirements, conceptual data modeling techniques, relational data models, normalization techniques, SQL usage, basic database administration tasks, data quality, and implementing, utilizing and securing relational databases using an industrial-strength database management system.
Prerequisites
CS 130, and (CS 213 or IS 310).
This course is an introduction to the understanding and promotes advocacy of the user in the development of IT applications and systems. The course develops a mind-set that recognizes the importance of users and organizational contexts and introduces user-centered methodologies for the development, evaluation,and deployment of IT applications and systems. The student develops knowledge of HCI topics including: user and task analysis, human factors, ergonomics, accessibility standards,and cognitive psychology.
Prerequisites
Junior status
This course is an introduction to project planning, cost estimation, scheduling and project management. The course covers software process standards, process implementation, software development, configuration management, productivity metrics, analysis of options and risk assessment. The course also covers the importance of planning for change, management of expectations, the importance of software contracts and intellectual property. The course uses case studies of real Industrial projects to introduce the student to problems that may be encountered in their career.
Prerequisites
Prerequisite: IS 320 or IT 320 or SE 310 or consent of instructor
In this course the student develops a project plan for a significant software system employing knowledge gained from courses throughout their major. The course demonstrates the ability for the student to develop a project plan which includes: the development of requirements, design of the product, implementation schedule, and quality assurance metrics. Success of the project is determined in large part by whether students have adequately solved their customer’s problem to be implemented in Capstone II.
Prerequisites
CS 400, and (IT 320 or SE 310)
In this course the student implements the outcomes of the project plan developed in Capstone I by employing knowledge gained from courses throughout their major. The course demonstrates the ability for the student to implement the details of the plan provided by Capstone I. Success of the project is determined in large part by whether students have adequately solved their customer’s problem.
Prerequisites
CS 480, and (IT 320 or SE 310)

Counseling

This course is an examination of the major theoretical approaches to counseling and their relationship to the counseling process. Analysis and evaluation of the function of theoretical constructs and their impact on counseling practice are emphasized.
Prerequisites
Admission to MSC degree program or consent of program chair
This is a graduate level course designed to explore ethical, legal, and professional issues in counseling, such as ethics codes, responsibility, competence, therapeutic boundaries, confidentiality, reporting abuse, and practicing in a managed care environment. Professional issues in the context of school and community mental health are also covered, as well as licensing, roles, policies, legislation, reimbursement, and the professional identity of counselors. Cultural diversity issues in counseling are also addressed.
Prerequisites
Admission to MSC degree program or consent of program chair
This course provides an examination of major theories of human development, including those from physical, psychological, cognitive, social, and moral perspectives. Development is viewed across the human life span in each of these areas. The course is designed to encourage an integrated concept of these theoretical perspectives, which serves as a developmental framework for the counseling process.
Prerequisites
Admission to MSC degree program
This course is an introductory research course for educators and those in other fields of human development. It is designed to provide students with the basic information needed to understand the process of systematically researching a problem and to enable students to evaluate and interpret the research of others. The course is taught using methods that provide the opportunity for theory to interact with practice.
Prerequisites
Admission to MSC degree program or consent of program chair
This is an applied educational course designed to help students develop culturally-competent counseling skills and knowledge involving diverse clientele in a phenomena of theory/practice interaction. Students in the course will explore the systemically conditioned perceptual viewpoints of human ethnic populations within the U.S. Such exploration will include possible causal elements of individual and group identity development and how such material is brought as a precondition into the counseling session as transference and counter-transference phenomena. This course assumes that the student has some prior knowledge of counseling/psychological theories and basic counseling skills.
Prerequisites
CNSL 509, CNSL 510, CNSL 554
This is an applied educational course designed to help in the preparation of professional mental health clinicians. Students will develop a theoretical foundation in career exploration skills, testing and strategic knowledge involving all stages of the career counseling process (i.e. theoretical orientation [career counseling orientation within the overall framing psycho-theoretical orientation], rapport building and collaborative skills, identifying client/macro-systemic multicultural issues and strengths, setting life/career goals, planning interventions, and overall ethical practice issues, etc.) under the supervision of faculty.
Prerequisites
Admission to MSC degree program or consent of program chair
The purpose of this course is for students to learn about select mental disorders that pose challenges to people across the lifespan. Biological, psychological, social and environmental factors implicated in vulnerability and resilience to these disorders are examined. Students develop skills in the diagnosis of mental disorders using the most current Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) criteria. Students also learn treatment planning strategies using best practice and evidence-based treatment approaches and models.
An examination of the history, contemporary research findings, and conceptual models, process issues, and ethics involved in the effective practice of group work. Participation in a group experience is required.
Prerequisites
CNSL 554, CNSL 570
This is a skills-based course designed to introduce students to the art and science of counseling and the early stages of the helping process. This goal will be met through the application of counseling theory to counseling practice. The art of counseling refers to the personalization the counselor brings to the counseling relationship and includes establishing a positive rapport with the client. The science of counseling includes critical thinking, assessment, use of data, and evaluation. Throughout this course, we will employ role plays and practice sessions to explore the ways in which theory informs practice and how counseling practice informs theory development.
This course provides an overview of the application of counseling skills and theory to counseling practice. This course includes an experiential approach to the development of counseling skills and the conceptualization of client concerns. The application of principles and techniques of major counseling theories will be presented. Skill practice will be included. Tape recordings are required.
Prerequisites
CNSL 509, CNSL 554
In this course special attention is given to counseling approaches for use with circumstantial and developmental life crises. Lecture/discussion, interviews, and guest speakers will be used throughout the semester to introduce and illustrate the uniqueness of crisis intervention and disaster mental health services from a counseling perspective.
Prerequisites
CNSL 509, CNSL 554, CNSL 570
This is a graduate level course designed to cover ethical and legal issues, selection, administration, and interpretation of various instruments commonly used in clinical/school settings to measure achievement, intelligence, aptitude, interest, personality, and ability. Students will be introduced to background statistics and test construction issues which are salient to the practice of assessment. Emphasis will be placed upon the selection of appropriate instruments, understanding technical data, including basic statistical concepts and analyzing and communicating results.
Introduction to major theories and counseling techniques specifically designed for children ages 2-15. This will include play and creative techniques applicable with various populations in numerous settings and adaptable to individual, family, and group modalities.
Prerequisites
CNSL 509, CNSL 515, CNSL 554
This course provides an overview of the use of medications for treating mental disorders in adults. The emphasis is on practical application: what should I know about the medicines my clients are taking? How do I educate clients about their medications? What positive effects and side effects might I see in my patients taking medication? How can I better collaborate with medical practitioners and other mental health professionals? This course will also explore related historical, social, ethnic and cultural factors. In addition, this course will look at how therapists can work effectively with family members, physicians, and other members of the collaborative mental health team.
Prerequisites
CNSL 509, CNSL 540, CNSL 550
This graduate course emphasizes the application of theory to practice of consultation with particular attention to several key elements: 1) the role and function of the counselor-trained consultant, 2) the use of counseling skills and knowledge in diverse areas of consultative practice and with a diverse clientele where counseling is not the primary driver of the activity, and 3) the reframing of the consultant psyche to a mindset that is primarily based on expertness, teaching (coaching), diagnosis and evaluation.
Prerequisites
CNSL 510, CNSL 590
This course is a survey course of the field of family and marriage counseling/ psychotherapy. This course begins by asking students to shift their worldview from linear to systemic. This shift is imperative for students to become effective counselors with families and couples. In-depth discussion of the history of the filed (i.e., how marriage and family counseling was developed), as well as introducing to the students the various theoretical orientations within the systemic framework will be the focus of this course.
Prerequisites
CNSL 509, CNSL 510, CNSL 540
This course provides an overview of the application of counseling theory to counseling practice of counseling in human services agencies and other community settings. Emphasis is given to the role, function, and professional identity of community counselors, and to principles and practices of community outreach, intervention, education, consultation, and client advocacy.
Prerequisites
CNSL 509, CNSL 510, CNSL 554
This course is designed to provide students with knowledge regarding techniques and skills for counseling children and adolescents. Specific discussions will focus on how counseling and play therapy theories influence the practice of counseling with children and adolescents and how current research and clinical practice influence the development of play therapy and counseling theories. Specific approaches and strategies for working with children and adolescents in the school, agency and private practice setting will be discussed.
This course will provide an introduction to current concepts relative to the school counseling profession. Practical application of concepts within the diverse range of school environments will be covered. Structuring and implementation of a feasible comprehensive counseling program will be emphasized.
Prerequisites
CNSL 509, CNSL 510, CNSL 554
This course provides an overview of the skills and theories relevant for treating substance abuse. Course will cover the psychological and psychological aspects, assessment, and treatment of clients with substance abuse disorders. The course will include application of knowledge using course assignments and extensive practice in various counseling techniques utilized in the treatment of alcohol and drug abuse.
Prerequisites
CNSL 509, CNSL 550, CNSL 554
Application of theory and development of counseling skills under supervision while counseling in schools, community agencies, higher education, hospitals, or other controlled clinical settings that total a minimum of 100 clock hours over a minimum 10-week academic term.
Prerequisites
The appropriate specialty course CNSL 581 or CNSL 583, CNSL 509, CNSL 552, CNSL 554, CNSL 570, minimum of 36 credit hours of course work completed in the degree program, and approved practicum application
The theories and techniques counselor supervisors utilize in providing clinical supervision to counselors. The process of administrative supervision utilized by counselor in work settings.
Prerequisites
CNSL 590
Application of theory and development of counseling skills under supervision while counseling in schools, community agencies, higher education, hospitals, or other controlled clinical settings that total a minimum of 300 clock hours. Both CNSL 597 and CNSL 598 must be completed to satisfy the program's internship requirement.
Prerequisites
CNSL 590, And an approved internship application
Approved internship application, along with above listed prerequisites. Application of theory and development of counseling skills under supervision while counseling in schools, community agencies, higher education, hospitals, or other controlled clinical settings that total a minimum of 300 clock hours. Both CNSL 597 and CNSL 598 must be completed to satisfy the program's internship requirement.
Prerequisites
CNSL 590, CNSL 597, And an approved internship application

Criminal Justice

History of the development of the criminal justice system in America. The everyday practices in this subsystem and the articulation amongst policing, judicial and correctional institutions.
Surveys the historical development of criminal law in America. Analysis of the effects of English common law, a federal structure, court decisions, legislated codes, historical events and social changes.
Prerequisites
CJ 224
This course explores alternative policing methods utilized in communities across the Unites States. Students will become familiar with pro-active and problem-oriented policing strategies ranging from youth education programs to saturation patrols. The effectiveness of alternative policing strategies will be discussed and compared to the traditional policing approach.
Development and operation of juvenile courts, treatment and rehabilitation strategies, diversion strategies.
Prerequisites
CJ 224
Juvenile gangs; causes and consequences of delinquency; prevention, treatment and control of delinquency.
Prerequisites
SOC 110
An analysis of various forms of crime, as well as various elements of the criminal justice system. The emphasis is on theories of crime and juvenile delinquency. Topics will include: street crime, organized crime, white-collar crime and the role of substance abuse in criminality and delinquency.
Prerequisites
SOC 110
Development and operation of policies and programs for the victims of crime, victim compensation schemes from colonial to modern times, victim/offender confrontation programs.
Prerequisites
SOC 110
The history of criminal, civic, and administrative law in America, the impact of society upon law and law upon society, sociology of the legal professions.
Prerequisites
CJ 237, and junior standing.
Fundamentals of criminal investigation: crime scene search and recording; collection and preservation of physical evidence; scientific aids; modus operandi; sources of information; interview and interrogation; follow-up and case preparation. Special emphasis on leadership and management actions taken to enhance investigative efforts.
Prerequisites
CJ 224 or CHEM 102
The history of policing in America; structure and functions of policing in contemporary America; police community relations in urban and rural settings.
Prerequisites
CJ 224
An introduction to concepts of ethics and an examination of contemporary ethical issues in the field of criminal justice.
Prerequisites
CJ 224 or CHEM 102
The history of corrections in American society, corrections and punishment in contemporary America, alternatives to institutional treatment.
Prerequisites
CJ 224
Students will analyze the criminal justice system in the United States in comparison to criminal justice systems and approaches worldwide. Different global political, economic, and cultural systems will provide the basis to evaluate the goals, structure, and correction strategies employed in the United States' criminal justice system.
As an interdisciplinary approach to the study of community-based sanctions in the United States, correctional alternatives to imprisonment are explored. Topics include the origins and evolution of correctional programs that function outside of total institutions; contemporary community-based sanctions philosophy; current research and recent legal developments in the field; correctional theories and practices; the role of law enforcement; the courts and probation and parole officers in offender supervision; issues and challenges facing reintegration and rehabilitation efforts; and other community based initiatives for adult and juvenile offenders.
Prerequisites
CJ 224
This course studies the management and control of the criminal justice system. The learner will be able to discuss the reasons for and effectiveness of management techniques applied to the justice system.
Prerequisites
CJ 224
An introductory study of the Criminal Justice system’s response to threats of international and domestic terrorism arising from both religious and secular roots. A special emphasis is placed on the development and maintenance of the law enforcement response to Department of Homeland Security requirements established within the context of public policy and preparedness strategies, including border security.
Prerequisites
CJ 224
This course examines intelligence analysis to protect the United States and its citizens. Current trends in the intelligence world will be examined, exploring the role of operations, operators, and source development in the context of national and local security management.
Prerequisites
PA 306
This course provides an evaluation of theory and research on confinement facilities for criminal offenders in the United States. The history and organization of prisons and jails are reviewed in conjunction with the changing punishment philosophies and how this evolution has influenced today’s institutional corrections. The problems within these facilities are examined with special attention paid to inmate adaptation, problems faced by facility officers, and the effectiveness of institutional treatment programs.
Prerequisites
CJ 380
Challenges associated with providing incarcerated offenders with special needs and adequate physical and mental health care are explored. Topics include juveniles in prison, pregnancy and motherhood, the chronic and mentally ill, geriatric offenders, faith based programming, incarcerated veterans, sex offenders, gay and lesbian inmates. A study of community based programs for adult and juvenile offenders, treatment modalities in various correctional settings, administration, legal issues, and future trends associated with community-based and institutional based treatment are also discussed.
Prerequisites
CJ 224
A Special Project allows the student to expand on work already completed in previous coursework. It is undertaken with the guidance of one or more faculty members and is intended to encourage the student into original investigation of a defined problem within the discipline. Examples include theses and themed portfolios or exhibitions. Prerequisite: Senior status.
Prerequisites
SOC 110

Early Childhood Education

This course helps students understand how health, safety, and nutrition affect the growth and development of children birth through age eight. The focus is on preventive health and working with families to promote wellness in young children. Topics include chronic diseases and medical conditions, medical emergencies, abused and neglected children, nutrients and nutrition guidelines, health and safety education, and planning for safety in indoor and outdoor environments.
Special Topics courses cover special topics not covered by current courses taught in the department. The particular topic selected is to be determined by the department according to the current need and interest. This course required departmental chair approval.
This field experience requires a minimum of 20 clock hours at the infant/ toddler level. The focus is observation and discussion of environments, interactions, and activities appropriate for infants/toddlers. There is an emphasis on Iowa’s Early Learning Standards.
This field experience requires a minimum of 40 clock hours at the prekindergarten level. The focus is observation and discussion of the role of a prekindergarten teacher. Students design and deliver lessons based on Iowa’s Early Learning Standards and Creative Curriculum.
The content of special topics courses will vary each time a special topic is offered.
This course provides students with a historical and philosophical foundation of early childhood education. Topics include issues and trends in the field of early childhood, theoretical perspectives related to child development, the importance of play, developmentally appropriate practice, and careers and professionalism for early childhood educators. Ten clock hours of observation in an early childhood setting are required.
Prerequisites
EDU 110
This course helps students understand the purpose of formal and informal assessment in early childhood. Students learn about different types of assessments used with infant through school age children. Topics include issues and trends in early childhood assessment, how to use assessment results, types of documentation and observation, checklists, rating scales and rubrics, portfolios, and communicating with parents. Ten clock hours of observation in an early childhood setting are required.
Prerequisites
EDU 110, ECE 451, and admittance into the Teacher Education Program
This course addresses the development of environments and curriculum for young children birth to preschool. Topics include developmentally appropriate practice, indoor and outdoor learning environments, the importance of play, anti-bias considerations, and exploration of curriculum models. Students plan curricula that incorporates dramatic play, art, music, fine and gross motor activities, sensory activities, science, social studies, math, literacy, and construction.
Prerequisites
EDU 110, ECE 451, and admittance into the Teacher Education Program.
This course provides guidance on the administration, organization, and operation of high quality early childhood programs for children birth to age eight. Topics include roles and responsibilities associated with the director role, state and federal guidelines, staff selection, supervision and evaluation, planning developmentally appropriate curriculum, financial and facility management, policy development, partnerships with families, and advocacy for young children.
Prerequisites
EDU 110, ECE 451, and admittance into the Teacher Education Program
This field experience requires a minimum of 20 clock hours at the infant/ toddler level. The focus is observation and discussion of environments, interactions, and activities appropriate for infants/toddlers. There is an emphasis on Iowa's Early Learning Standards.
This field experience requires a minimum of 40 clock hours at the prekindergarten level. The focus is observation and discussion of the role of a prekindergarten teacher. Students design and deliver lessons based on Iowa’s Early Learning Standards and Creative Curriculum.
This course helps students understand how health, safety, and nutrition affect the growth and development of children birth through age 8. The focus is on preventive health and working with families to promote wellness in young children. Topics addressed include chronic diseases and medical conditions, medical emergencies, abused and neglected children, nutrients and nutrition guidelines, health and safety education, and planning for safety in indoor and outdoor environments.
This course covers special topics not covered by current courses taught in the department. The particular topic is to be determined by the department according to the current need and interest. This course requires program chair approval.
This course provides students with a historical and philosophical foundation of early childhood education. Topics include issues and trends in the field early childhood, theoretical perspectives related to child development, the importance of play, developmentally appropriate practice, and careers and professionalism for early childhood educators. Ten clock hours of observation in an early childhood setting are required.
This course helps students understand the purpose of formal and informal assessment in early childhood. Students learn about different types of assessments used with infant through school age children. Topics include issues and trends in early childhood assessment, how to use assessment results, types of documentation and observation, checklists, rating scales and rubrics, portfolios, and communicating with parents. Ten clock hours of observation in an early childhood setting are required.
Prerequisites
ECE 451 or ECE 551
This course provides guidance on the administration, organization, and operation of high quality early childhood programs for children birth to age eight. Topics include roles and responsibilities associated with the director role, state and federal guidelines, staff selection, supervision, and evaluation, planning developmentally appropriate curriculum, financial and facility management, policy development, partnerships with families, and advocacy for young children.
Prerequisites
ECE 451 or ECE 551
This course addresses the development of environments and curriculum for young children birth to preschool. Topics include developmentally appropriate practice, indoor and outdoor learning environments, the importance of play, anti-bias considerations, and exploration of curriculum models. Students plan curricula that incorporates dramatic play, art, music, fine and gross motor activities, sensory activities, science, social studies, math, literacy, and construction.
Prerequisites
ECE 451 or ECE 551

Earth Science

Students will explore the Earth’s structure and composition, and the geologic processes acting on and within our planet. Topics covered include: geologic time; historical geology; formation of minerals, rocks and fossils; plate tectonics; volcanism; mountain building; earthquakes; and surface processes such as erosion.
This course introduces students to the principles of natural resource occurrence and use, and covers conservation issues and strategies from an earth systems perspective.
Humans often find themselves directly in the path of natural processes and the natural evolution of landscapes. The course covers a variety of natural hazards and related disasters including flooding, volcanoes, landslides, earthquakes, hurricanes, and tsunami. These phenomena are studied in the context of geology and earth-system processes contributing to and controlling them, strategies and systems for managing risk, and impacts on socities worldwide.
Dinosaur paleontology incorporates concepts from geology and biology and integrates aspects of chemistry, physics and mathematics to explain and understand these magnificent animals, the environments in which they lived, and the processes that have shaped our dynamic Earth. Students learn how to apply the scientific method in learning about dinosaurs from their fossil remains.
The Earth is a dynamic system that supports all life. The flow of energy and cycling of matter through the geosphere, atmosphere, hydrosphere, and biosphere provide us with air, water and food, and with resources to support economic development. Environmental problems such as air and water pollution, soil degradation and erosion, and loss of biodiversity threaten our ability to sustain the growing human population. This course develops scientific understanding of Earth systems, examines the impacts of human activities, and describes the role of scientific knowledge and research in meeting environmental and resource challenges.
Students learn and practice inquiry and geoscience techniques in field settings and in the laboratory, enhancing their understanding of fundamental earth systems science principles and concepts learned in ES 100 or ES 161. Corequisite or prerequisite: ES 100 or ES 161
Utilization of Earth’s natural resources by humans can threaten soils and the quality of water. This course introduces students to principles of conservation and stewardship of resources. This is presented in the context of scientific methodology or the ways in which scientific knowledge and research contribute to sustainable management of soil and water resources.
Life has persisted on Earth for billions of years, despite a number of globally significant mass extinction events. Fossils provide the evidence necessary to understand the causes and effects of these events, as well as the ecosystem recovery and evolutionary radiation that may follow them. In this course, one or more of the most significant extinction events in the history of life will be explored in depth. Concepts and methods in paleontology will be covered, along with an overview of the history of life on Earth.
Students will participate in a scientific field trip to observe and investigate a notable locality, and learn or reinforce principles and concepts in the geosciences. They will use scientific methodologies to study the area before and during the trip, and to document their findings. Following the trip, they will report their results, interpretations and conclusions.
This course focuses on the study of landforms and their relationship to underlying geologic structure and lithology. Topics include weathering, soil formation, erosion, sediment production, and landform genesis in fluvial, arid/semiarid, glacial, periglacial, karst, eolian, and coastal environments. Laboratory exercises emphasize interpretation of topographic maps and use of aerial photography and satellite imagery for environmental applications. Field excursions will focus on local fluvial, glacial, and karst landforms. A field trip fee may be required.
Prerequisites
(ES 100 or ES 161 or GEOG 100) and ES 175; or consent of instructor
This course covers the principles of sustainable development, with an emphasis on the impact of current economic growth on the future viability of natural ecosystems. Existing opportunities for achieving a balance between economic growth and the need for the protection of natural systems will be addressed from a variety of perspectives.
Prerequisites
ES 100 or ES 161 or GEOG 100, or consent of instructor.
This course provides an introduction to soils as natural bodies and to the study of soil characteristics and classification, including the basics of soil profile description, field textural classification, recognition of master horizons, and essential soil-landscape, soil-vegetation, and soil-climate relationships. Laboratory work involves field excursions to describe soils and examine soil-landscape relationships. A field trip fee may be required.
Prerequisites
[(ES 100 or ES 161 or GEOG 100), and ES 175] or CHEM 151; or consent of instructor.
This course studies how institutions, interests and ideologies have shaped environmental policy, and examines the interaction of economic, cultural, and ecological factors in an integrated approach focused at the water-food-energy nexus. The use and misuse of scientific knowledge, methods, and research, and incorporation of indigenous/traditional knowledge will be addressed. Case studies will include local, national, and global environmental issues such as water quality and availability, agricultural production of food, feed, fiber and fuels; soil erosion, depletion, and degradation; depletion of stratospheric ozone; decrease of biodiversity; globalization of e-waste and waste cycles; and impacts of extractive industries such as mining and fossil fuel production.
Prerequisites
ES 100 or ES 161 or GEOG 100
Sustainability may be defined as meeting the needs of the present population without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs. This course introduces the theory, principles and practices of sustainability. Using a systems approach, students will assess the sustainability of communities, businesses and organizations in a specific region. They will use scientific evidence and reasoning in developing alternative policies and practices that support ecological and environmental health, a vibrant economy, and social justice.
Prerequisites
ES 100 or ES 161 or GEOG 100, or consent of instructor.
Students will investigate the occurrence and behavior of water in the geologic environments in the context of the hydrologic cycle. Topics include hydrologic processes in surface and ground waters; pollution and contamination of water resources; surface water-ground water interaction; saturated and unsaturated zone processes; movement of chemicals in soils; site characterization; soil remediation techniques; and development and management of water resources. Applied field and laboratory methods for hydrogeologic investigations are emphasized. A field trip fee may be required.
Prerequisites
(ES 100 or ES 161 or GEOG 100) and ES 175; or consent of instructor. Successful completion of a college mathematics course recommended.

Economics

This course explores consumer choice and producer behavior, markets in a supply and demand framework, effects of government intervention in markets, and market structures.
This course explores GDP, unemployment, business cycles, deficits and debt, markets in an aggregate supply and demand framework, effects of monetary and fiscal policy in markets, and the fractional reserve banking system.
Prerequisites
ECON 160
This course explores the basic microeconomic and macroeconomic principles as they apply to agricultural markets. Topics of study include consumer choice and producer behavior, markets in a supply and demand framework, resource economics, world food situation, marketing of agricultural products, and agricultural public policy.
Prerequisites
ECON 160, ECON 161
A study of major landmarks in the growth and development of Western Economics; the evolution of agriculture, industry, transportation and finance; the influence of government and international determinants. Note: Same as HIST 281
A study of the commercial banking system; thrift institutions; the Federal Reserve System; money, interest rates, savings and credit; government regulatory institutions and policies. Same as FIN 310.
Prerequisites
ECON 161
This course analyzes government roles in environmental issues, such as greenhouse gas emissions, climate change, and oil spills. This course will use economic tools like cost-benefit analysis and cost-effectiveness analysis to assess current and past environmental regulations and legislation.
Prerequisites
ECON 160 or ES 321
The study of health and health care decisions by firms, households, and governments using economic theories and models. Students use microeconomic tools to analyze efficiency and equity in health and health care markets.
Prerequisites
ECON 160
This course studies current and past labor force trends. This course analyzes the impacts of worker mobility, human capital investment, discrimination, and government intervention on the labor demand and wage determination of firms and labor supply decisions of individuals and households.
Prerequisites
ECON 160
The study of the roles of the government in the economy. This course analyzes the impacts of government expenditure programs and taxation systems on the welfare and decision-making of households and firms.
Prerequisites
ECON 160
This course studies the global economy, the role of business, and the economic interaction of countries involving trade.
Prerequisites
ECON 161
This course covers the fundamental concepts of principles of economics and integrates them in the context of managerial decision making in global and local marketplaces. Microeconomic and macroeconomic principles are incorporated through real world examples of theory and policy, as well as through their application in the decisions of managers as they struggle to operate efficiently and profitably.
Prerequisites
ECON 160, ECON 161

Education

Youth Mental Health First Aid is designed to teach parents, family members, caregivers, teachers, school staff, peers, neighbors, health and human service workers, and other caring citizens how to help an adolescent (ages 12-18) who is experiencing a mental health or addictions challenge or crisis. Youth Mental Health First Aid is primarily designed for adults who regularly interact with young people.
This course presents the history, structure, philosophy and socioeconomic factors of education in a democratic society. It deals with current issues confronting schools, including professional ethics, legal rights and responsibilities of professional educators and students. It provides the theoretical framework for additional education courses. A mandatory 20-hour practicum in a school setting runs concurrently with this course.
This course is a study of the growth and development of humans from conception to senescence with an emphasis on birth to young adulthood. Physical, cognitive, social, affective, language and moral development will be explored. Topics will also include: individual and group similarities and differences; exceptional or abnormal development; and guiding parents, caregivers, community and staff regarding the implications of the stages of development.
This course integrates the study of the principles and theories of psychology as they relate to human learning and assessment in education. It includes theories of human development, cognition and educational research, including the study and assessment of traditional and exceptional learners, learners with disabilities and gifted and talented learners. Students will obtain practical understanding and experience in designing and administering a variety of assessment formats. Special emphasis is given to the effective use of both formative and summative assessments that are directed toward meeting the needs of all learners. Both criterion and norm-referenced tests will be discussed in relation to ranges and ages and abilities of students. The processes of instructional design, motivation, classroom management, discipline, measurement and evaluation will be integrated for a comprehensive look at student learning. A general psychology course is recommended prior to this course.
This course is designed to meet the human relations and multiculturalism requirements for teacher education and certification in the state of Iowa. It includes cognitive, affective and skill components that will contribute to the development of, sensitivity to, and understanding of the values, beliefs, lifestyles and attitudes of individuals and the diverse groups found in a pluralistic society. Topics discussed are the variables of ethnicity, race, social class, gender, religion, exceptionality, language and age, and the implications for human relations and education in particular. Meets cultures requirement for general education requirements.
This course provides knowledge of grammatical aspects of the English language (nouns, verbs, adjectives, clauses, verb-subject agreement, etc.) as they relate to the development of effective oral and written communication skills.
Special Topics courses cover special topics not covered by current courses taught in the department. The particular topic selected is to be determined by the department according to the current need and interest. This course required department chair approval.
This course emphasizes effective communication techniques through the exposure to a wide array of instructional media including computer software and hardware. The use of multimedia will be utilized in a simulated classroom presentation by each pre-service educators.
This course incorporates the use of a problem-solving approach in the development of mathematical topics relevant to the K-8 elementary school teacher. Topics will be selected from the following: sets, functions and logic, numeration systems and whole numbers, integers, rational numbers, number theory, decimals, probability and statistics, geometry and concepts of measurement. This course is recommended for anyone who will be teaching mathematics in grades K-8. This course does not satisfy the general education mathematics requirement.
Students must take a separate, specific methods course for each secondary subject area in which they are seeking endorsement and licensure. The courses are intended to develop pre-service educators’ understanding and application at the secondary (grades 5-12) level of teaching strategies, classroom management, instructional planning principles and design within their specific discipline. These courses provide pre-service educators with an understanding of the modern practices, techniques and trends in their subject areas of teaching.
Prerequisites
EDU 110, EDU 319, A minimum of six credits of upper-division courses within the discipline and admittance to the Teacher Education Program
Students must take a separate, specific methods course for each secondary subject area in which they are seeking endorsement and licensure. The courses are intended to develop pre-service educators’ understanding and application at the secondary (grades 5-12) level of teaching strategies, classroom management, instructional planning principles and design within their specific discipline. These courses provide pre-service educators with an understanding of the modern practices, techniques and trends in their subject areas of teaching.
Prerequisites
EDU 110, EDU 319, A minimum of six credits of upper-division courses within the discipline and admittance to the Teacher Education Program
Students must take a separate, specific methods course for each secondary subject area in which they are seeking endorsement and licensure. The courses are intended to develop pre-service educators’ understanding and application at the secondary (grades 5-12) level of teaching strategies, classroom management, instructional planning principles and design within their specific discipline. These courses provide pre-service educators with an understanding of the modern practices, techniques and trends in their subject areas of teaching.
Prerequisites
EDU 110, EDU 319, A minimum of six credits of upper-division courses within the discipline and admittance to the Teacher Education Program
Students must take a separate, specific methods course for each secondary subject area in which they are seeking endorsement and licensure. The courses are intended to develop pre-service educators’ understanding and application at the secondary (grades 5-12) level of teaching strategies, classroom management, instructional planning principles and design within their specific discipline. These courses provide pre-service educators with an understanding of the modern practices, techniques and trends in their subject areas of teaching.
Prerequisites
EDU 110, EDU 319, A minimum of six credits of upper-division courses within the discipline and admittance to the Teacher Education Program
Students must take a separate, specific methods course for each secondary subject area in which they are seeking endorsement and licensure. The courses are intended to develop pre-service educators’ understanding and application at the secondary (grades 5-12) level of teaching strategies, classroom management, instructional planning principles and design within their specific discipline. These courses provide pre-service educators with an understanding of the modern practices, techniques and trends in their subject areas of teaching.
Prerequisites
EDU 110, EDU 319, A minimum of six credits of upper-division courses within the discipline and admittance to the Teacher Education Program
Students must take a separate, specific methods course for each secondary subject area in which they are seeking endorsement and licensure. The courses are intended to develop pre-service educators’ understanding and application at the secondary (grades 5-12) level of teaching strategies, classroom management, instructional planning principles and design within their specific discipline. These courses provide pre-service educators with an understanding of the modern practices, techniques and trends in their subject areas of teaching.
Prerequisites
EDU 110, EDU 319, A minimum of six credits of upper-division courses within the discipline and admittance to the Teacher Education Program
Students must take a separate, specific methods course for each secondary subject area in which they are seeking endorsement and licensure. The courses are intended to develop pre-service educators’ understanding and application at the secondary (grades 5-12) level of teaching strategies, classroom management, instructional planning principles and design within their specific discipline. These courses provide pre-service educators with an understanding of the modern practices, techniques and trends in their subject areas of teaching.
Prerequisites
EDU 110, EDU 319, A minimum of six credits of upper-division courses within the discipline and admittance to the Teacher Education Program
Students must take a separate, specific methods course for each secondary subject area in which they are seeking endorsement and licensure. The courses are intended to develop pre-service educators’ understanding and application at the secondary (grades 5-12) level of teaching strategies, classroom management, instructional planning principles and design within their specific discipline. These courses provide pre-service educators with an understanding of the modern practices, techniques and trends in their subject areas of teaching.
Prerequisites
EDU 110, EDU 319, A minimum of six credits of upper-division courses within the discipline and admittance to the Teacher Education Program
Students must take a separate, specific methods course for each secondary subject area in which they are seeking endorsement and licensure. The courses are intended to develop pre-service educators’ understanding and application at the secondary (grades 5-12) level of teaching strategies, classroom management, instructional planning principles and design within their specific discipline. These courses provide pre-service educators with an understanding of the modern practices, techniques and trends in their subject areas of teaching.
Prerequisites
EDU 110, EDU 319, A minimum of six credits of upper-division courses within the discipline and admittance to the Teacher Education Program
This course will focus on current best-practice, research-based methods of inquiry-based teaching and learning of science for the very young child through elementary school with an emphasis on the experimental and constructivism approach. An integrated teaching approach will be used to help pre-service educators learn to develop goals and objectives, apply the Characteristics of Effective Instruction of the Iowa Core, utilize methodologies, organize curriculum and assess learning through science content including life science, physical science, and earth-space science. Pre-service educators will develop curriculum, units and lessons based on state and national standards to use in their student teaching and teaching experiences. Science lessons will be written utilizing the 5 E’s (Engage, Explore, Explain, Extend, and Evaluate) learning cycle approach to instructional design. Integration of technology, creative arts, and classroom management as they apply to teaching and to student learning in elementary science are addressed.
Prerequisites
EDU 315 (for Elementary Education and PreK-Grade 3: Inclusive Settings majors) or EDU 319 (for Secondary majors)
This is the first of two field experience courses that provide pre-service educators with an opportunity to “see into the daily life” of the teacher so they will develop a more complete and accurate picture of the expectations for a teacher. This course is taken in conjunction with the pre-service educators’ methods course (EDU 315 Teaching Elementary Social Studies). Through this Field Experience course, pre-service educators will develop deeper understandings of the teacher as a professional who uses his/her knowledge and skills to make and carry out decisions to foster students’ educational development and school achievement. Pre-service educators will complete various activities on site for a minimum of 40 hours and they will complete various assignments to help them understand more deeply the Iowa Teaching Standards and Criteria. During seminar classes pre-service educators will receive training concerning chemical hazards they may come in contact within a school setting. They will also discuss the standards of professional conduct and ethics associated with the teaching profession. Pre-service educators will be required to teach a lesson. At the end of this forty (40) hour placement, pre-service educators will be assessed on their knowledge of the Iowa Teaching Standards and Criteria. In order to be admitted to Student Teaching, pre-service educators must successfully successfully meet the appropriate levels of performance required through the field experience assessment.
Prerequisites
Admittance to the Teacher Education Program
This is the first of two field experience courses that provide pre-service educators with an opportunity to “see into the daily life” of the teacher so they will develop a more complete and accurate picture of the expectations for a teacher. This course is taken in conjunction with the pre-service educators’ methods course (EDU 319 Methods: Secondary). Through this Field Experience course, pre-service educators will develop deeper understandings of the teacher as a professional who uses his/her knowledge and skills to make and carry out decisions to foster students’ educational development and school achievement. Pre-service educators will complete various activities on site for a minimum of 40 hours and they will complete various assignments to help them understand more deeply the Iowa Teaching Standards and Criteria. During seminar classes pre-service educators will receive training concerning chemical hazards they may come in contact within a school setting. They will also discuss the standards of professional conduct and ethics associated with the teaching profession. Pre-service educators will be required to teach a lesson. At the end of this forty (40) hour placement, pre-service educators will be assessed on their knowledge of the Iowa Teaching Standards and Criteria. In order to be admitted to Student Teaching, pre-service educators must successfully meet the appropriate levels of performance required through the field experience assessment.
Prerequisites
Admittance to the Teacher Education Program
This is the first of two field experience courses that provide pre-service educators with an opportunity to “see into the daily life” of the teacher so they will develop a more complete and accurate picture of the expectations for a teacher. This course is taken in conjunction with the pre-service educators’ methods course (either EDU 315 Teaching Elementary Social Studies or EDU 319 Methods: Secondary). Through this Field Experience course, pre-service educators will develop deeper understandings of the teacher as a professional who uses his/her knowledge and skills to make and carry out decisions to foster students’ educational development and school achievement. Pre-service educators will complete various activities on site for a minimum of 40 hours and they will complete various assignments to help them understand more deeply the Iowa Teaching Standards and Criteria. During seminar classes pre-service educators will receive training concerning chemical hazards they may come in contact within a school setting. They will also discuss the standards of professional conduct and ethics associated with the teaching profession. Pre-service educators will be required to teach a lesson. At the end of this forty (40) hour placement, pre-service educators will be assessed on their knowledge of the Iowa Teaching Standards and Criteria. In order to be admitted to Student Teaching, pre-service educators must successfully meet the appropriate levels of performance required through the field experience assessment.
Prerequisites
Admittance to the Teacher Education Program
The emphasis in this course is the impact of developmental movement experiences, healthful habits, music and dance activities, play environments, materials, and developmentally appropriate activities for children birth through elementary.
Prerequisites
EDU 315 (for Elementary, Early Childhood and Instructional Strategist majors) or EDU 319 (for Secondary majors)
This course is intended to provide a survey of visual arts activities for the prekindergarten through elementary teacher, which could be integrated into the curriculum.
Prerequisites
EDU 315 (for Elementary Early Childhood and Instructional Strategist majors) or EDU 319 (for Secondary majors)
This course is a study of the current methods and new trends in teaching a foreign language to elementary school children. Emphasis is placed on the development and organization of a foreign language curriculum, methodology, selecting materials and evaluation of learning.
Prerequisites
EDU 315 (for Elementary, Early Childhood and Instructional Strategist majors) or EDU 319 (for Secondary majors)
This course will focus on current best-practice, research-based approaches to the teaching and learning of social sciences. An integrated teaching approach will be used to help pre-service educators develop goals and objectives, apply the Characteristics of Effective Instruction of the Iowa Core, enhance content knowledge, utilize methodologies, organize curriculum and assess learning in a variety of ways. In this course, pre-service educators will initially learn to develop curriculum including unit and lesson planning. This is reinforced in other elementary education courses, such as Teaching Elementary Language Arts, Teaching Elementary Science, and Teaching Elementary Math. Pre-service educators will develop projects, lessons and units based on state and national standards to use in their student teaching and teaching experiences. Activities will include the broad areas of social sciences: history, geography, political science, civic literacy and economics. Integration of technology, classroom management, and the creative arts, as they apply to teaching and to student learning in the social sciences are addressed.
Prerequisites
EDU 110, And admittance to the Teacher Education Program
This course helps to prepare pre-service educators for teaching in secondary (middle and high) schools. Pre-service educators develop a 10 lesson interdisciplinary thematic unit (ITU) with associated lesson plans and teach a lesson from that unit. The ITU is expected to address various standards expressed in the UIU Teacher Education Program and include appropriate outcomes, objectives, activities, materials, lesson plans, and an assessment plan with associated artifacts. As pre-service educators construct the ITU, they learn about appropriate categories of instructional strategies that research has demonstrated influence student achievement. Pre-service educators also become aware of the “dimensions of learning” as a useful framework for understanding teaching and learning.
Prerequisites
EDU 110, And admittance to the Teacher Education Program
This is the second of two field experience courses that provide pre-service educators with an opportunity to “see into the daily life” of the teacher so they will develop a more complete and accurate picture of the expectations for a teacher. This course is taken in conjunction with the pre-service educators’ methods courses (EDU 305 Teaching Elementary Science, EDU 325 Teaching Elementary Mathematics, EDU 335 Teaching Elementary Language Arts, EDU 326 Developmental Reading). Through this Field Experience course, pre-service educators will develop deeper understandings of the teacher as a professional who uses his/her knowledge and skills to make and carry out decisions to foster students’ educational development and school achievement. Pre-service educators will complete various activities on site for a minimum of 40 hours and they will complete various assignments to help them understand more deeply the Iowa Teaching Standards and Criteria. Pre-service educators will be required to teach a literacy lesson and a math lesson. At the end of this forty (40) hour placement, pre-service educators will be assessed on their knowledge of the Iowa Teaching Standards and Criteria. In order to be admitted to Student Teaching, pre-service educators must successfully meet the appropriate levels of performance required through the field experience assessment.
Prerequisites
Admittance to the Teacher Education Program, Prerequisite or Corequisite: EDU 253 or EDU 325 and EDU 326
This is the second of two field experience courses that provide pre-service educators with an opportunity to “see into the daily life” of the teacher so they will develop a more complete and accurate picture of the expectations for a teacher. This course is taken in conjunction with the pre-service educators’ methods courses (EDU 300’s: Teaching Secondary School Subjects) Through this Field Experience course, pre-service educators will develop deeper understandings of the teacher as a professional who uses his/her knowledge and skills to make and carry out decisions to foster students’ educational development and school achievement. Pre-service educators will complete various activities on site for a minimum of 40 hours and they will complete various assignments to help them understand more deeply the Iowa Teaching Standards and Criteria. Pre-service educators will be required to teach a lesson. At the end of this forty (40) hour placement, pre-service educators will be assessed on their knowledge of the Iowa Teaching Standards and Criteria. In order to be admitted to Student Teaching, pre-service educators must successfully meet the appropriate levels of performance required through the field experience assessment.
Prerequisites
Admittance to the Teacher Education Program
This is the second of two field experience courses that provide pre-service educators with an opportunity to “see into the daily life” of the teacher so they will develop a more complete and accurate picture of the expectations for a teacher. This course is taken in conjunction with the pre-service educators’ methods courses (EDU 305 Teaching Elementary Science, EDU 325 Teaching Elementary Mathematics, EDU 335 Teaching Elementary Language Arts, EDU 336 Teaching K-12 Physical Education, EDU 337 Teaching K-12 Health, EDU 338 Teaching K-12 Art or EDU 339 Teaching World Languages K-12). Through this Field Experience course, pre-service educators will develop deeper understandings of the teacher as a professional who uses his/her knowledge and skills to make and carry out decisions to foster students’ educational development and school achievement. Pre-service educators will complete various activities on site for a minimum of 40 hours and they will complete various assignments to help them understand more deeply the Iowa Teaching Standards and Criteria. Pre-service educators will be required to teach a lesson. At the end of this forty (40) hour placement, pre-service educators will be assessed on their knowledge of the Iowa Teaching Standards and Criteria. In order to be admitted to Student Teaching, pre-service educators must successfully meet the appropriate levels of performance required through the field experience assessment.
Prerequisites
Admittance to the Teacher Education Program
This field experience is taken only if a student transfers a minimum of 40 hours for Field Experience II. This course is for students to acquire knowledge of the Iowa Teaching Standards 4-8 in the Field Experience II seminar.
This course incorporates the use of a problem solving approach in the development of mathematical topics relevant for the preschool through middle school teacher. Concepts include the NCTM standards, five content standards and five process standards. These include problem solving; reasoning; communication; the ability to recognize, make and apply connections; integration of manipulatives; the ability to construct and to apply multiple connected representation; and the application of content in real world experiences. Instructional methods and classroom management include the selection and use of appropriate instructional materials including technology, for the very young child through elementary age student.
Prerequisites
EDU 315 (for Elementary, Early Childhood and Instructional Strategist majors) or EDU 319 (for Secondary majors)
This course introduces pre-service educators to the instructional and pedagogical foundations of teaching elementary through secondary school students to read and write in an evidence-based literacy program. Components of the course include the major areas of reading (phonemic awareness, phonics, vocabulary, fluency, and comprehension), writing, spelling, and grammar. Students examine how reading motivation, technology integration, and classroom management are essential to a successful literacy program. Students are introduced to the role of a multi-tiered system of support in assessing, diagnosing, and evaluating student literacy learning.
Prerequisites
EDU 315 (for Elementary, Early Childhood and Instructional Strategist majors) or EDU 319 (for Secondary majors)
A survey of literature for infants, prekindergarten, kindergarten, elementary and secondary aged students together with the study of the purpose and utilization of literature in the classroom. Pre-service educators will document developmentally appropriate reading materials and activities to use in their teaching experiences. Literature is used as a model for reading and writing processes. The creative arts component of performance arts is addressed in this course including, but not limited to, storytelling, puppetry, choral reading, and poetry presentations. This course does not satisfy the general education requirement for literature.
This course will focus on current best-practice, research-based approaches to the teaching and learning of elementary language arts, which includes reading, writing, speaking, viewing, listening and visually representing. An integrated teaching approach will be utilized to help pre-service educators develop goals and objectives, apply the Effective Teaching Strategies of the Iowa Core, enhance content knowledge, utilize methodologies, organize curriculum and assess learning in a variety of ways. Pre-service educators will develop curriculum, lessons and units based on state and national standards to use in their student teaching and teaching experiences. Integration of technology, creative arts performance arts components, and classroom management, as they apply to teaching and to student learning in the language arts are addressed.
Prerequisites
EDU 315 (for Elementary, Early Childhood and Instructional Strategist majors) or EDU 319 (for Secondary majors)
Students in this course will study human growth and development related to the physical education of children in elementary, middle, and high school. Emphasis is placed on the impact of developmental movement experiences, curriculum, teacher behavior, class management, dance activities, play environments, materials, and developmentally appropriate activities. Same as EXSS 336
Prerequisites
EDU 110, EDU 319, And admittance to the Teacher Education Program
This course is a study of methods, materials, curriculum development with an emphasis on nutrition, safety and healthy lifestyle. Included is information for use in health activities and presentations for students in elementary, middle, and high school. It provides information on current health legislation and public policy. Same as EXSS 337
Prerequisites
EDU 110, EDU 319, And admittance to the Teacher Education Program
This course is intended to develop the student’s understanding and application of teaching strategies, classroom management, instructional planning principles, and design within art. This course provides students with an understanding of modern practices, techniques, and trends in art. This course also provides students with a philosophical foundation for teaching art.
Prerequisites
EDU 315 (for Elementary, Early Childhood and Instructional Strategist majors) or EDU 319 (for Secondary majors)
This course develops pre-service educators’ understanding and application of teaching strategies, classroom management, instructional planning principles, assessment, and unit design as it relates to world language. This course provides pre-service educators with an understanding of the modern practices, techniques, and trends in world language. Teaching the culture of the world language is also addressed.
This course specifies how to assess students and how to use assessment results to provide effective instruction. The following components are included: knowledge of existing standardized diagnostic reading instruments, development and implementation of informal reading inventories and teacher-developed instruments, determination of reading and writing instructional strategies (including content area reading strategies) linked to the assessment, and writing summative reports for stakeholders. A 15 clock hours tutoring experience is required.
Prerequisites
EDU 110, Prerequisite or Co-requisite: EDU 326.
This course develops the pre-service educator’s and teacher’s understanding and application of curriculum development, individual assessment of student’s reading, writing, language arts and integrated research abilities, and group management and motivation. In this course, pre-service educators and teachers accept responsibilities within the classroom setting to assist in the reading instructional program by working under the guidance of the cooperating teacher in both individualized and group reading situations. 60 clock hours of practicum required.
Prerequisites
EDU 110, EDU 326, EDU 407, Prerequisite or Corequisite: EDU 485
This course develops the pre-service educator’s and teacher’s ability to assess, evaluate and instruct students with significant difficulties in reading, language arts or content area reading. In this course, pre-service educators and teachers accept responsibilities within the classroom setting to assist in the reading instructional program by working under the guidance of the cooperating teacher in both individualized and group reading situations. 60 clock hours of practicum required.
Prerequisites
EDU 110, EDU 326, EDU 407, Prerequisite or Corequisite: EDU 485
This course provides instruction in how to develop individualized content reading skills for elementary, middle school, junior high and high school students; how to evaluate readability of textbooks and students’ ability to read texts through informal teacher made assessments (formative assessments); how to integrate technology in content area reading and how to develop strategies to assist students in reading their content area textbooks. In addition, students develop knowledge of the different types of writing and speaking; knowledge of narrative, expressive, persuasive, informational, and descriptive writing and speaking; writing as communication; and differentiated instructional strategies for reading and writing in the content areas.
Prerequisites
Prerequisite: EDU 315 (for Elementary, Early Childhood and Instructional Strategist majors) or EDU 319 (for Secondary majors)
This course will provide the requisite middle school methodology to use along with the elementary or secondary school major. Curriculum design and instructional knowledge will be presented including: teaming, pedagogy and instructional methodology for a middle school. A minimum of 15 clock hours will be spent observing and/or assisting in a middle school setting.
Prerequisites
EDU 110, And admission to the Teacher Education Program
This course will provide the requisite middle school knowledge of the growth and development of the middle school age student to include emotional, physical and mental characteristics and needs. Management of middle school students will be discussed in relation to being able to use a variety of instructional strategies learned from either elementary or secondary methods courses to modify for use with middle school age students. Specific middle school scenarios and management situations will also be discussed in relation to unique middle school management techniques. A minimum of 15 clock hours will be spent observing and/or assisting in a middle school setting.
Prerequisites
EDU 110, And admission to the Teacher Education Program
This course discusses the characteristics, social and emotional needs, and special populations of gifted children. Identification, assessment, counseling, parenting, and program interventions for gifted children are introduced.
Prerequisites
And admission to the Teacher Education Program or practicing teacher
This course provides knowledge and application of characteristics, methods, and curriculum for teaching gifted students. Methods for teaching differentiated strategies, collaborative strategies, and critical thinking strategies throughout the Prek-12 curriculum are addressed.
Prerequisites
EDU 439, And admission to the Teacher Education Program or practicing teacher
This course explains the process in identifying gifted students and how to respond with appropriate programming. Designing, conducting, and reporting program evaluation and assessment are also explained.
Prerequisites
EDU 439, And admission to the Teacher Education Program or practicing teacher
This course develops the educator’s understanding and application of curriculum, methods, assessment and program evaluation for gifted programs. Educators accept responsibilities within the classroom setting to assist the instruction program by working under the guidance of the cooperating teacher in both individualized and group situations. Sixty (60) clock hours of practicum are required in a classroom with gifted students.
Prerequisites
EDU 539, EDU 541, And Admission to the Teacher Education Program, May be taken as a corequisite with EDU 440
This course is for the purpose of developing awareness and understanding of the fundamental concepts and principles involved in writing the English language. Grammar and composition will be highlighted.
Prerequisites
EDU 110, And admittance to the Teacher Education Program, Highly recommended: 3 credit hours of foreign language at the college level
This course will assist pre-service educators and teachers to develop the capacity to address the differential learning and transition needs of culturally and linguistically diverse students. Understanding changes occurring in the American classroom and understanding significant factors in those changes, such as students and their families who are culturally and linguistically diverse, are goals of this course. Effective programming models are an additional understanding. In the context of these understandings, appropriate content-based instructional practices, accommodations to facilitate students’ access to the curriculum, and assessment of student learning become the main foci of this course.
Prerequisites
EDU 110, And admittance to the Teacher Education Program
Language Acquisition provides ideas for pre-service educators and teachers to promote oral language, reading, and writing development in English for K-12 English Language Learners. It will provide pre-service educators and teachers with language acquisition theory, classroom organization, strategies, and assessment procedures for effective English learner instruction.
Prerequisites
EDU 110, And admittance to the Teacher Education Program
This course develops the pre-service educator’s and teacher’s understanding and application of curriculum and methods in ESL. In this course, pre-service educators and teachers accept responsibilities within the classroom setting to assist in the instructional program by working under the guidance of the cooperating teacher in both individualized and group situations. Sixty (60) clock hours of practicum are required in a classroom with ELLs present.
Prerequisites
EDU 110, or co-requisite, EDU 444 and admittance to the Teacher Education Program
The course will investigate the grammatical system of English; emphasis will be placed on tools and processes used to identify, assess, and teach grammatical patterns in written and spoken English for English Language Learners.
Prerequisites
EDU 110, And admittance to the Teacher Education Program
In this course pre-service educators and teachers will study how cultural and linguistic diversity are linked and how teachers must be prepared to effectively teach students whose backgrounds are different from their own. Specifically, pre-service educators and teachers will study the following: 1) language, text, and context, 2) teacher ideologies and motivation for change, 3) issues of diversity and literacy learning, 4) out-of-classroom influences on literacy learning, and 5) sociolinguistics.
Prerequisites
EDU 110, And admittance to the Teacher Education Program
This course covers special topics not covered by current courses taught in the department. The particular topic is to be determined by the department according to the current need and interest. This course requires department chair approval.
This course is designed as professional development in environmental education for pre-service and in-service educators in all subject areas. The Environmental Issues Instruction (eii) teaching model is presented in a hands-on, inquiry-based approach. Application of the model in the classroom is required to complete the course. Emphasis is placed on using research-based instructional strategies in the teaching of this environmental issues unit. This course may be repeated with different topics.
This course is a continuation of the study of elementary and secondary reading and language arts instruction. It identifies current instructional issues and offers methods to support children and youth with a wide range of learning needs within a comprehensive literacy program. Students will use the accumulated knowledge from prior reading and language arts coursework as a basis to launch additional exploration of challenges within instruction for phonetic awareness, word identification/phonics, vocabulary, fluency, comprehension, and writing. In this context, students will critically consider and apply current research to support success for children and youth struggling with components or reading and language arts, including students participating in reading intervention, students with disabilities, and students learning English. There is a required 15 clock hour practicum.
Prerequisites
EDU 110, EDU 326, EDU 407, And admittance to the Teacher Education Program, May be taken concurrently with EDU 409 or EDU 410.
This seminar provides a foundational understanding of Math Daily 3. Emphasis is placed on research-based practices in teaching and learning, along with materials, methods, and skills used in to teach students mathematics in grades K-8. Components examined include brain research, organizing student data, brief and detailed focus lessons, differentiation in te mathematics classrom, moving from assessment to instruction, and tracking student progress. This workshop provides practitioners with the knowledge and skills to successfully implement Math Daily 3 in their own classrooms.
This course specifies how to assess students and how to use assessment results to provide effective instruction. The following components are included: knowledge of existing standardized diagnostic reading instruments, development and implementation of informal reading inventories and teacher-developed instruments, determination of reading and writing instructional strategies (including content area reading strategies) linked to assessment, and writing summative reports for stakeholders. A 15 hour tutoring experience is required.
This course develops the student’s understanding and application of curriculum development, individual assessment of student’s reading, writing, language arts and integrated research abilities, and group management and motivation at the elementary/secondary level. In this course, students accept responsibilities within the classroom setting to assist in the reading instructional program by working under the guidance of the cooperating teacher in both individualized and group reading situations. Sixty clock hours of practicum required.
Prerequisites
EDU 507, EDU 585
This course develops the student’s understanding and application of curriculum development, individual assessment of student’s reading, writing, language arts and integrated research abilities, and group management and motivation at the secondary level. In this course, students accept responsibilities within the classroom setting to assist in the reading instructional program by working under the guidance of the cooperating teacher in both individualized and group reading situations. Sixty clock hours of practicum required.
Prerequisites
EDU 507, EDU 585
This course primarily introduces Master of Education candidates in learning how to read and evaluate educational research. Candidates will also translate administrative questions into problem statements and research questions in preparation for conducting and writing a literature review. Various research designs will be studied: ethnographic, action, evaluation, descriptive, historical, correlational, experimental, quasi-experimental, and causal-comparative.
This course provides an opportunity to learn best practice related to creating effective and supportive classroom and school learning environments. In this course, learners will examine instructional strategies designed specifically to improve student feedback, enhance delivery of content, and meet the contextual needs of students. A final research paper examines actual research results supporting instructional strategies of interest.
This course focuses on the design, development, and integration of educational technology methods for teaching, learning, and personal productivity. This course engages the student in the application of current research and theory into the instructional design process. Students will complete an action research project in their specialized areas. Students should be able to use basic computer software (word processing, spreadsheets, database management) upon entrance to the program.
This course will provide the requisite middle school methodology to use along with the elementary or secondary school major. Curriculum design and instructional knowledge will be presented including: teaming, pedagogy and instructional methodology for a middle school. A minimum of 15 clock hours will be spent in observing and/or assisting in a middle school setting.
Prerequisites
Licensed teacher
This course will provide the requisite middle school knowledge of the growth and development of the middle school age student to include emotional, physical and mental characteristics and needs. Management of middle school students will be discussed in relation to being able to use a variety of instructional strategies learned from either elementary or secondary methods courses to modify for use with middle school age students. Specific middle school scenarios and management situations will also be discussed in relation to unique middle school management techniques. A minimum of 15 clock hours will be spent in observing and/or assisting in a middle school setting.
Prerequisites
Licensed teacher
This course provides the theoretical foundation for student-involved classroom assessment. The course focuses on the role of classroom assessment in measuring student understanding and achievement as well as the various methods available to assess a variety of achievement targets. It provides complete coverage of educational assessment, including developing plans that integrate teaching and assessment, evaluating students and discussing evaluations with parents. No formal coursework in statistics or college mathematics is necessary to complete the course. The course includes comprehensive treatment of traditional and alternativeassessments designed to provide practical use for classroom teachers.
This course focuses on developments in educational psychology and cognitive science as they apply to student learning and teaching. Emphasized in this course are brain-based learning, multiple intelligences, motivational theory and practice, issues related to diversity and learning as well as other current topics in educational psychology.
This course provides instruction in how to develop individualized content reading skills for elementary, middle school, junior high and high school students; how to evaluate readability of textbooks and students’ ability to read texts through informal teacher made assessments; how to integrate technology in content area reading and how to develop strategies to assist students in reading their content area textbooks. In addition, participants develop knowledge of the different types of writing; knowledge of narrative, expressive, persuasive, informational, and descriptive writing; writing as communication; and differentiated instructional strategies for reading and writing in the content areas.
This course focuses on the various instructional methods that have been identified through research to be the most effective at enhancing student achievement. Learners will investigate the targeted strategies addressed in the Selective Methods course. The intention is to provide learners enough experience with the strategies to use them effectively in the classroom.
Recognizing Everyone's Strengths by Peacebuilding, Empathizing, Communicating, and Trustbuilding
This course will assist students in developing their own understandings of historical and contemporary issues related to diversity, equity and inclusion or inclusivity. It will examine how we research and think about race, class, gender, ethnicity, nationality, religion, age, ability and sexuality. Students will explore how the issues of personal and institutional racism and classism impact student achievement, in particular the achievement gap in American K-12 schools as well as within higher education. Broader theoretical constructs related to culture and identity will be drawn upon to inform our understanding and analysis of students within the preschool to college context.
This course affords participants an opportunity to gain a deeper understanding about the effective use of professional learning communities. This course utilizes the Learning by Doing handbook for professional learning communities to help PLC leaders and participants learn how to improve PLC’s and increase their impact on student achievement. The process of creating common formative and common summative assessments will be explored as well as using the data from those assessments to improve learning. The final project for this course requires students to complete a PLC Action Plan that incorporates the concepts learned in the class to a practical plan of action for achieving an effective PLC.
This course provides a foundational understanding of the Math Daily 3 structure. Emphasis is placed on research-based practices in teaching and learning along with materials, methods, and skills used to teach students math in grades K-8. Components examined include: classroom design, brain research, motivation in teaching and learning, developing independence, organizing student data, brief and detailed focused lessons, differentiation in the mathematics classroom, moving from assessment to instruction, and monitoring student progress. This course provides practitioners with the knowledge and skills to successfully implement the Math Daily 3 structure in their own classrooms. It is the only course approved by Gail Boushey and Joan Moser, the creators of Math Daily 3.
This course focuses on the role of the instructional coach in the PreK-12 educational setting. Class participants will learn to become reflective about their own teaching effectiveness and apply that knowledge to instructional coaching practices. Teachers will learn to critique instructional delivery according to research-based models, especially Marzano’s Art and Science of Teaching Model. Class participants are expected to observe and conference with peers toward the goal of improved instruction.
This course focuses on backward design. Using the Understanding by Design framework of Wiggins and McTighe, students will design curriculum that is rigorous, engaging and connected to state or national standards. Particular attention is devoted to the alignment of goals, objectives, activities and assessments of learning. Students design actual units of instruction, integrating their knowledge of design, curriculum, methods, and assessment.
This course focuses on the societal and political contexts in which schools operate. After first becoming aware of various theories regarding educational policy issues and the various dimensions (or frames of reference) from which they can be viewed, learners will examine various issues that are likely to have an impact on classroom teaching and learning. Each week the learner will defend a personal stance based on the readings and additional supportive research. Educational policy areas likely to be considered include those having to do with governance, curriculum, accountability, personnel development, and school finance.
This course discusses the characteristics, social and emotional needs, and special populations of gifted children. Identification, assessment, counseling, parenting, and program interventions for gifted children are introduced.
Prerequisites
Licensed teacher
This course provides knowledge and application of characteristics, methods, and curriculum for teaching gifted students. Methods for teaching differentiated strategies, collaborative strategies, and critical thinking strategies throughout the PreK-12 curriculum are addressed.
Prerequisites
EDU 539, Licensed teacher
This course explains the process in identifying gifted students and how to respond with appropriate programming. Designing, conducting, and reporting program evaluation and assessment are also explained.
Prerequisites
EDU 539, Licensed teacher
This course develops the educator's understanding and application of curriculum, methods, assessment and program evaluation for gifted programs. Educators accept responsibilities within the classroom setting to assist the instruction program by working under the guidance of the cooperating teacher in both individualized and group situations. Sixty (60) clock hours of practicum are required in a classroom with gifted students.
Prerequisites
EDU 539, EDU 541, Licensed teacher, May be taken as a co-requisite with EDU 540
The course is for the purpose of developing awareness and understanding of the fundamental concepts and principles involved in writing the English language. Grammar and composition will be highlighted.
Prerequisites
Highly recommended: 3 credit hours of foreign language at the college level.
This course will assist preservice educators and teachers to develop the capacity to address the differential learning and transition needs of culturally and linguistically diverse students. Understanding changes occurring in the American classroom and understanding significant factors in those changes, such as students and their families who are culturally and linguistically diverse, are goals of this course. Effective programming models are an additional understanding. In the context of these understandings, appropriate content-based instructional practices, accommodations to facilitate students’ access to the curriculum, and assessment of student learning become the main foci of this course.
Language Acquisition provides ideas for pre-service educators and teachers to promote oral language, reading, and writing development in English for K-12 English Language Students. It will provide pre-service educators and teachers with language acquisition theory, classroom organization, strategies, and assessment procedures for effective English student instruction.
This course develops the learner's understanding and application of curriculum and methods in ESL. in this course, learners accept responsibilities within the classroom setting to assist in the instructional program by working under the guidance of the cooperating teacher in both individualized and group situations. Sixty (60) clock hours of practicum are required in a classroom with ELLs present.
Prerequisites
EDU 543, EDU 544 (Co-Requisite)
This course will investigate the grammatical system of English; emphasis will be placed on tools and processes used to identify, assess, and teach grammatical patterns in written and spoken English for English Language Students.
Prerequisites
EDU 543
In this course students will study how cultural and linguistic diversity are linked and how teachers must be prepared to effectively teach students whose backgrounds are different from their own. Specifically, students will study the following: 1) language, text, and context, 2) teacher ideologies and motivation for change, 3) issues of diversity and literacy learning, 4) out-of-classroom influences on Literacy learning, and 5) sociolinguistics.
These courses will address specific instructional approaches that are timely and relevant to current K-12 classrooms. The topics will vary based on the identified needs of K-12 teachers and the expertise available to address these needs.
This workshop provides a foundational understanding of the Literacy CAFE. Emphasis is placed on research-based practices in literacy instruction along with materials, methods, and skills used to teach students reading in grades K-8. Comonents examined include: brain research, organizing student data, brief and detailed focus lessons, differentiation in the literacy classroom, moving from assessment to instruction, and tracking student progress. This workshop provides practitioners with the knowledge and skills to successfully implement the Literacy CAFE in their own classrooms.
This workshop provides a foundational understanding of the Daily 5 structure. Emphasis is placed on research-based practices in literacy instruction along with materials, methods, and skills used to teach students reading in grades K-8. Components examined include: classroom design, brain research, motivatin in teaching and learning, developing independence, and differentiation in the literacy classroom. This workshop provides practitioners with the knowledge and skills to successfully implement the Daily 5.
This course provides a foundational understanding of both the Daily 5 structure and the LIteracy CAFE. Emphasis is placed on research-based practices in literacy instruction along with materials, methods, and skills used to teach students reading in grades K-8. Cmponents examined include: classroom design, brain research, motivation in teaching and learning, developing independence, organizing student data, brief and detailed focus lessons, differentiation in the literacy classroom, moving from assessment to instruction, and tracking student progress. This course provides practitioners with the knowledge and skills to successfully implement both the Daily 5 and Literacy Cafe in their own classrooms. It is the only course approved by Gail Boushey and Joan Moser, the creators of Daily 5 and CAFE.
This course is designed as professional development in environmental education for pre-service and in-service educators in all subject areas. The Environmental Issues Instruction (eii) teaching model is presented in a hands-on, inquiry-based approach. Application of the model in the classroom is required to complete the course. Emphasis is placed on using research-based instructional strategies in the teaching of this environmental issues unit. This course may be repeated with different topics.
Best Practices in Literacy Intervention is a course that explores best practices in interventions and reading strategies. The course will utilize the Teaching Reading Sourcebook, which will provide an exensive list of reading strategies targeted by skill area. Along with the Reading Sourcebook students in the course will examine the book Simplifying Response to Intervention to reflect on best practices when it comes to both school and district work regarding the three tiers of instruction and intervention work. This course is designed to prepare students for work in both a Reading Specialist and Leadership position.
This course examines the development, implementation and evaluation of reading programs for PreK through 12 learners. This course will provide a wide system overview of reading programs in schools focusing on the administrative responsibilities needed to oversee such programs. This course will examine carefully at how legislation impacts instruction in schools. Within the course, learners will work to promote parent and community involvement as an important partnership in literacy work.
This course is a continuation of the study of elementary and secondary reading and language arts instruction. It identifies current instructional issues and offers methods to support children and youth with a wide range of learning needs within a comprehensive literacy program. Students will use the accumulated knowledge from prior reading and language arts coursework as a basis to launch additional exploration of challenges with instruction for phonemic awareness, word identification/phonics, vocabulary, fluency comprehension, and writing. In this context, students will critically consider and apply current research to support success for children and youth struggling with components of reading and language arts, including students participating in reading intervention, students with disabilities, and students learning English. There is a required 15-clock-hour practicum.
Prerequisites
EDU 507, May be taken concurrently with EDU 509 or EDU 510.
The reading specialist/ literacy coach internship prepares teachers to collaborate with teachers in grades K-12 toward the goal of improving reading instruction. Throughout this internship candidates will utilize diagnostic reading assessments to provide research-based targeted instruction. Participants will study leadership qualities and reflect and demonstrate the skills needed to serve as a teacher leader in the area of literacy. The internship can be completed within one's own school district. The internship requires a minimum of 60 hours with a detailed log of literacy work and collaboration.
Prerequisites
Prerequisite or Co-requisite: EDU 580 and EDU 581
This seminar serves to integrate the student's coursework in education by examining in-depth an issue or problem of significance and special interest to the student. Research, writing, and presentation skills are employed in this course. Each student will design his/her own project, subject to approval of the faculty member, in order to fulfill the course requirements. The project shall demonstrate (1) integration of the M.Ed. program objectives, (2) graduate level writing skills using APA format, (3) graduate level critical thinking skills and (4) in-depth understanding and application of the objectives of the area of emphasis utilizing appropriate research techniques. A research paper and a PowerPoint presentation are required.
Prerequisites
Completion of all courses in emphasis area (may take one area of emphasis course concurrently)
This seminar serves to integrate the student’s coursework in education by examining in-depth an issue or problem of significance and special interest to the student. Research, writing, and presentation skills are employed in this course. Each student will design his/her own project, subject to approval of the faculty member, in order to fulfill the course requirements. The project shall demonstrate (1) integration of the M.Ed. program objectives, (2) graduate level writing skills using APA format, (3) graduate level critical thinking skills and (4) in-depth understanding and application of the objectives of the area of emphasis utilizing appropriate research techniques. A research paper and a PowerPoint presentation are required.
Prerequisites
Completion of all courses in emphasis area (may take one area of emphasis course concurrently)
This seminar serves to integrate the student’s coursework in education by examining in-depth an issue or problem of significance and special interest to the student. Research, writing, and presentation skills are employed in this course. Each student will design his/her own project, subject to approval of the faculty member, in order to fulfill the course requirements. The project shall demonstrate (1) integration of the M.Ed. program objectives, (2) graduate level writing skills using APA format, (3) graduate level critical thinking skills and (4) in-depth understanding and application of the objectives of the area of emphasis utilizing appropriate research techniques. A research paper and a PowerPoint presentation are required.
Prerequisites
Completion of all courses in emphasis area (may take one area of emphasis course concurrently)
This seminar serves to integrate the student’s coursework in education by examining in-depth an issue or problem of significance and special interest to the student. Research, writing, and presentation skills are employed in this course. Each student will design his/her own project, subject to approval of the faculty member, in order to fulfill the course requirements. The project shall demonstrate (1) integration of the M.Ed. program objectives, (2) graduate level writing skills using APA format, (3) graduate level critical thinking skills and (4) in-depth understanding and application of the objectives of the area of emphasis utilizing appropriate research techniques. A research paper and a PowerPoint presentation are required.
Prerequisites
Completion of all courses in emphasis area (may take one area of emphasis course concurrently)
This seminar serves to integrate the student’s coursework in education by examining in-depth an issue or problem of significance and special interest to the student. Research, writing, and presentation skills are employed in this course. Each student will design his/her own project, subject to approval of the faculty member, in order to fulfill the course requirements. The project shall demonstrate (1) integration of the M.Ed. program objectives, (2) graduate level writing skills using APA format, (3) graduate level critical thinking skills and (4) in-depth understanding and application of the objectives of the area of emphasis utilizing appropriate research techniques. A research paper and a PowerPoint presentation are required.
Prerequisites
Completion of all courses in emphasis area (may take one area of emphasis course concurrently)
This seminar serves to integrate the student’s coursework in education by examining in-depth an issue or problem of significance and special interest to the student. Research, writing, and presentation skills are employed in this course. Each student will design his/her own project, subject to approval of the faculty member, in order to fulfill the course requirements. The project shall demonstrate (1) integration of the M.Ed. program objectives, (2) graduate level writing skills using APA format, (3) graduate level critical thinking skills and (4) in-depth understanding and application of the objectives of the area of emphasis utilizing appropriate research techniques. A research paper and a PowerPoint presentation are required.
Prerequisites
Completion of all courses in emphasis area (may take one area of emphasis course concurrently)
This seminar serves to integrate the student’s coursework in education by examining in-depth an issue or problem of significance and special interest to the student. Research, writing, and presentation skills are employed in this course. Each student will design his/her own project, subject to approval of the faculty member, in order to fulfill the course requirements. The project shall demonstrate (1) integration of the M.Ed. program objectives, (2) graduate level writing skills using APA format, (3) graduate level critical thinking skills and (4) in-depth understanding and application of the objectives of the area of emphasis utilizing appropriate research techniques. A research paper and a PowerPoint presentation are required.
Prerequisites
Completion of all courses in emphasis area (may take one area of emphasis course concurrently)

English

This workshop is offered in conjunction with English 101 and is designed for students who need further instruction nd assistance in a small group setting. This workshop is graded on a pass/fail basis only.
This workshop is offered in conjunction with English 102 and is designed for students who need further instruction and assistance in a small group setting. This workshop is graded on a pass/fail basis only.
This course provides instruction and practice in reading comprehension and vocabulary development. Students may be assigned into this course based on the Accuplacer Computerized Placement test results and high school transcripts. Other students desiring additional help may also register for the course.
This course is designed for students who demonstrate a need for help in written composition including skills development in basic sentence structure and syntax. It prepares students for potential success on a challenge examination to determine readiness for ENG 101, but it does not include academic credit toward a degree.
This course prepares students with limited writing experience for the General Education writing sequence. Emphasis is on grammar, organization and structure of English composition, and on revision processes. Multiple writing assignments of varied lengths and complexities are assigned. Designed for first time freshman students who have not scored at least 18 on the verbal portion of the ACT test. This course does not count toward the completion of the English major.
This course includes study and practice of rhetorical conventions and styles, including description, narration, explanation and argument. Students are expected to have already demonstrated college-ready skills in grammar and sentence structure evidenced by a score of 18 or higher on the verbal section of the ACT test or the satisfactory completion of a challenge examination. Emphasis is on the development of a sound understanding of rhetorical principles, and written compositions are regularly assigned. This course does not count toward the completion of the English major.
Prerequisites
ACT (verbal portion) of at least 18 or the completion of ENG 100 or successful performance on challenge examination
This course provides study and practice of expository writing techniques, with emphasis on persuasion, argument, critical evaluation and the use of research material. A formal research paper is required among the regularly assigned written compositions. This course does not count toward the completion of the English major.
Prerequisites
ENG 101
English 122/222/322 courses are for students preparing to be writing consultants or prospective teachers who want practice providing feedback to student writers, improve writing and presentation skills, and further their knowledge about collaborative learning in a writing center. ENG 122, 222, and 322 run concurrently. Note: Enrollment in this course serves as a requirement for work placement in the Writing Center.
Prerequisites
ENG 101, ENG 201 or concurrent enrollment in ENG 201
This course concentrates on the reading of selected short fiction and poetry, presenting and introduction to literary analysis, interpretation and evaluation. Meets the humanities requirement.
An introduction to writing in a variety of literary genres, including fiction, poetry, and creative nonfiction. The course will encourage students to solve creative problems by the creation of original work using literary elements and a variety of techniques. Both study and practice of the genres is expected. Students will also critically respond to the work of their peers.
Prerequisites
ENG 101
A survey of major American authors from the colonial period to the Civil War. The focus is on the evolution of a unique national literature and a characteristic world view. Meets the humanities requirement.
A survey of major American authors from the Civil War to the present. The focus is on trends in American literature since the turn of the 20th century. Meets the humanities requirement.
A survey of British literature from Beowulf through the end of the 18th century. The focus is on major authors and significant historical influences in the development of British literature. Meets the humanities requirement.
A survey of British literature from the publication of Lyrical Ballads in 1798 to the present. Meets the humanities requirement.
Survey of world literature, British and American excluded, from the Renaissance to the present. This survey will include selections from masterpieces of African, Arabic, Asian, Caribbean, European, Australasian, Indian, Latin American, and Russian fiction, drama, and poetry in translation. Selections will vary depending on the session. Meets the humanities requirement.
A survey of the major themes and genres in Western mythology, the foundational narratives of the Western literary and artistic traditions. Myths and myth-patterns from both classical Greek and Roman authors as well as those from Scandinavian/Germanic and Egyptian cultures will be examined, including their influence from ancient to modern times. Meets the humanities requirement.
ENG 122/222/322 courses are for students preparing to be writing consultants or prospective teachers who want practice providing feedback to student writers, improve writing and presentation skills, and further their knowledge about collaborative learning in a writing center. ENG 122, 222, and 322 run concurrently. Note: Enrollment in this course serves as a requirement for work placement in the Writing Center.
Prerequisites
ENG 122
This course draws upon a wide range of poetic experience, exploring what poetry is, how it works, and what is required to enter and traverse the world of a poem. Meets the humanities requirement.
Exploration of the mystery story by examining its historical development from the mid-nineteenth century to the present, and by examining a spectrum of writers-mystery specialists and literary writers from Europe, America, South Africa and Latin America. Techniques and development will be discussed and evaluated. Meets the humanities requirement.
Special Topics courses are studies of selected problems, periods or movements in the subject area not otherwise included in the curriculum. They are typically chosen from a faculty member’s particular expertise and field of scholarly inquiry, and offered to a student or group of students forming an interest in the particular subject matter. The 250 designation denotes a General Education level of instruction and may include an appropriate General Education task to be completed. The 450 designation denotes a senior level degree of sophistication expected in both learning and instruction. A single course may be offered at both levels simultaneously, in which case the syllabus will clearly differentiate the course expectations and assessment measures for students enrolled at each of the two levels. A Special Topics course must be approved by the School of Liberal Arts Curriculum Committee before it is offered, and it must address one or more Major Outcomes within the discipline.
Survey of African American writing, film and thought from colonial times to the present, with emphasis in the developing relationship between the larger American culture and African American reactions and contributions to it. May be used to fulfill the humanities or cultures requirement, but not both.
Students in this course will study the techniques of reading and writing short stories, poems, and creative non-fiction. They will evaluate creative work, both their own and that of established, published authors, for style, dialogue, character, tone, narrative, form, and voice. Students will become familiar with what makes good writing, as well as spend time writing their own creative work.
Prerequisites
ENG 170
Study of television programs and programming from the "Golden Age" to the present. Analysis of television's relation to postmodern American literature, culture, and aesthetics. Same as COMM 275.
An introduction to narrative fiction films, using concepts of art, theatre and literature, and including a study of film aesthetics from a historical perspective. Same as COMM 290.
Opportunity to develop professional competence in expository and research writing and to enhance one's sense of the English language and its structure. Designed for upper class students preparing for careers in professions which emphasize written communication skills.
This is a course in the history and aesthetics of African American film. It includes study and analysis of films made primarily, although not exclusively, by African American directors and utilizing largely African American casts and crews. It will approach these films from both social and aesthetic perspectives and investigate commonalities among them as well as overall shifts in the perspectives which inform them.
Prerequisites
ENG 101, Recommended: ENG 102. Encouraged: ENG 290 or ENG 265
ENG 122/222/322 courses are for students preparing to be writing consultants or prospective teachers who want practice providing feedback to student writers, improve writing and presentation skills, and further their knowledge about collaborative learning in a writing center. ENG 122, 222, and 322 run concurrently. Note: Enrollment in this course serves as a requirement for work placement in the Writing Center.
Prerequisites
ENG 222
An introduction to Shakespeare’s writing through an analysis of selected tragedies, comedies, histories, and poems. The goal of this course is to make Shakespeare accessible to 21st century audiences from both literary and performance perspectives. Meets the humanities requirement.
Prerequisites
ENG 102
A survey of American and British poetry and prose from WWII to the present day. The course will concentrate on specific form, content, meaning and symbolism singular to this period. The course will analyze the emerging trends of “modern” literature and the effects of social mores upon the genre.
Prerequisites
ENG 101
This course traces the historical and cultural development of literature for young adults. The course will include a critical study and evaluation of books written for and marketed to adolescents. Does not satisfy the general education requirement for literature or education.
Prerequisites
ENG 101
This course looks in depth at the literary traditions inherent in J.R.R. Tolkien's works, including fairy and folktale motifs as well as several major trends in English epic literature presented in both text and film adaptations. Meets the humanities requirement.
Prerequisites
ENG 102 recommended
A study of the historical development of the English novel and its influences as a distinct literary type. The course includes a critical study of representative works by several major British and American novelists.
Prerequisites
ENG 101
A survey of the scholarly, saucy, and salacious English literature of the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries, when English became a recognized language of literary expression and exploration. This course will examine some of the major works that emerged from this period, including Arthurian legends, Pearl, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, and Piers Plowman, as well as key genres such as romances and devotional writings: exploring both what “literature” meant to writers in late medieval England, and also what it meant to be writing in English at the time.
Prerequisites
ENG 101
A survey of the broad-ranging literature of the “eighteenth” century-from the restoration of the English monarchy in 1660 to the rise of Romanticism- including poetry, prose, drama and, to a lesser degree, philosophical treatises.
Prerequisites
ENG 101
This class introduces students to best selling books from the New York Times best seller list in order to learn more about the American psyche, what energizes a writer in creating a book, how long it takes a writer to create a book and what factors cause a book to become a best seller. Meets the humanities requirement.
Prerequisites
ENG 101
Focused study of the major British poets of the 19th Century including William Wordsworth, John Keats, Robert Browning and Alfred Lord Tennyson among others.
Prerequisites
ENG 101
Investigation of the flowering of African American art and culture during the 1920s and beyond in the phenomenon generally known as the Harlem Renaissance. Includes consideration of music and design as well as of literature in the developing social milieu.
Prerequisites
ENG 101
An examination of the image of women presented in literature, contrasting traditional and contemporary, male and female depictions. The emphasis is on the writings of women. Meets the humanities requirement.
Prerequisites
ENG 101
This course provides the opportunity to develop skill in writing, to improve sense of language structure and to find satisfaction in written communication. The emphasis is on the development of a personal expository style.
Prerequisites
ENG 170, ENG 270
This workshop is designed to give students intensive practice in story craft through writing and evaluating their own work, and critiquing the work of their peers. Emphasis will be placed on revising, re-imagining, developing, shaping and polishing student writing.
Prerequisites
ENG 170, ENG 270
This workshop is designed to give students intensive practice in crafting poetry through writing and evaluating their own work, and critiquing the work of their peers. Emphasis will be placed on revising, re-imagining, developing shaping, and polishing student writing.
Prerequisites
ENG 170, ENG 270
This course explores imaginative responses to the experience of the Middle West, from pioneer times through the mid-20th century. Meets the humanities requirement.
Prerequisites
ENG 101
Consideration of the major voices of and influences on the development of a distinctive American literature in the mid-19th century. Includes study of Emerson, Thoreau, Melville, Longfellow, Dickinson and Whitman.
Prerequisites
ENG 101
This course examines the principles that determine the judgement of literary critics and writers. Emphasis is on the historical development of critical theory from Plato to the present day.
Prerequisites
Completion of one sequence of British, American, or World literature
Special Topics courses are studies of selected problems, periods or movements in the subject area not otherwise included in the curriculum. They are typically chosen from a faculty member’s particular expertise and field of scholarly inquiry, and offered to a student or group of students forming an interest in the particular subject matter. The 250 designation denotes a General Education level of instruction and may include an appropriate General Education task to be completed. The 450 designation denotes a senior level degree of sophistication expected in both learning and instruction. A single course may be offered at both levels simultaneously, in which case the syllabus will clearly differentiate the course expectations and assessment measures for students enrolled at each of the two levels. A Special Topics course must be approved by the School of Arts and Sciences Curriculum Committee before it is offered, and it must address one or more Major Outcomes within the discipline.

ESL

Reading skills development is the focus for this course. Students have short readings on a variety of topics to work on finding meaning in context, reading comprehension, identifying main ideas and significant details, retelling stories, and scanning for specific information. As students read out loud, they practice sounding out words and using correct pronunciation. Through vocabulary instruction and academic reading, students begin building high frequency vocabulary necessary at the undergraduate level. Through the act of extensive reading, students improve reading fluency. An introduction to both the university and community library is made.
This course will help students become familiar with and comfortably use basic grammatical concepts like parts of speech, verb tenses, modals, count and noncount nouns, coordinating conjunctions, and quantity and degree words. The basic idea of comparatives and superlatives and gerunds and infinitives are introduced.
Because students are at the initial stage of English writing, they first develop solid sentence structure and then move to paragraph writing. As students are introduced to the paragraph and the process of writing (brainstorming, preparing a first draft, revising, editing, and publishing the final product), they are also introduced to graphic organizers that help them organize their ideas for writing. Students learn and practice writing a paragraph with its different parts: a topic sentence, supporting details, and a concluding statement. Students learn the importance of good punctuation in writing. To enhance students’ writing, students learn the different spelling rules. This course will prepare students for the intermediate intensive English writing course.
This course is designed to help students begin speaking in different scenarios, feel more comfortable while speaking, and speak more often. Students are given speech patterns as a foundation for their speaking. Listening is a large component to dialogue, so students will practice listening comprehension through identification of significant details. They will also be given strategies for checking understanding. Distinguishing close sounds will be practiced such as with numbers and contractions. Body language is studied as a way for students to potentially determine meaning in conversation. To improve pronunciation, students work with American Speechsounds software on individual phonetic sounds. The International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) is introduced to assist with pronunciation learning. The connection betweenpronunciation and intonation is introduces.
This course will assist intensive English students in improving their listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills through the exploration of American culture. Students gain an understanding of how Americans interact and do things. They learn how to effectively communicate around town and on campus. Culturally appropriate behavior within the context of an American community and university is learned. Service learning is conducted at local destinations such as convalescent homes and public schools to better understand culture within these places and increase students’ sense of global citizenship. Field trips focused on American culture and history are frequently taken to give students practical exposure and experience. Involvement in campus life is encouraged to help students begin using their English outside of the classroom in natural settings.
This reading course complements ESL 023 Writing II with emphasis on recognizing and detecting the writing devices and grammar that make text understandable for readers. The students learn such strategies and skills for recognizing main ideas and supporting details; getting meaning from context; skimming for main ideas; summarizing; drawing conclusions; and building vocabulary. Pronunciation, intonation, and decoding are focused on in the context of reading. Students begin putting ideas together from readings, and sharing them with the class. The students do extensive reading to build reading fluency. An introduction to undergraduate textbooks is made to begin helping with adaptation to undergraduate studies and the advanced reading course (ESL 031).
Students will begin examining grammar academically in relationship to speaking, reading, and writing. After reviewing present and past verb tenses, perfect tenses are practiced. Previously learned grammar concepts such as count and noncount nouns, the definite article, modals, the future, prepositions, comparatives and superlatives, and gerunds and infinitives will be looked at more thoroughly. Students become familiar with and comfortable using new grammar concepts related to pronouns, adverbs, and phrasal verbs. The dependent clause is introduced on a sentence structure level. Students begin looking for patterns in grammar.
In ESL 023 Writing II, students move from paragraph writing to short essays of different genres. They learn how to present information into a well-organized format according to U.S. academics, which puts emphasis on the thesis statement and transitional expressions. Graphic organizers and concept maps are used to help students brainstorm and organize their thoughts. In order to help the students navigate the writing process; they prewrite, prepare first drafts, revise, edit, and publish their work. Through this process, students begin applying their grammar knowledge, enhance vocabulary, focus on mechanics, and improve spelling. Students move from primarily using simple sentences to predominantly using compound and complex sentences. This course will prepare students for the advanced ESL writing course.
ESL Listening/Speaking II will assist ESL students in improving their academic listening and speaking skills through the observation and exposure to a variety of authentic listening and speaking situations - radio programs, songs, discussions, role play, real life occurrences, and speeches. Students have the opportunity to observe undergraduate courses in order to begin self-assessing their academic listening skills and gain exposure to the undergraduate classroom. To improve pronunciation, students work with American Speechsounds software on phonetic sounds at word level. The International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) is reviewed to assist with pronunciation learning. The study of intonation complements the students’ study of pronunciation.
Students will explore the foundation of the United States’ history, government, and culture through the integration of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. This foundation will prepare students for a deeper study of American culture and values in ESL 035 American Culture III. Service learning is conducted at local destinations such as convalescent homes and public schools to better understand culture within these places and increase students’ sense of global citizenship. Field trips focused on American culture and history are frequently taken to give students practical exposure and experience. Students begin to be kept accountable for getting involved in campus events and clubs to gain an improved understanding of campus life and more thoroughly enjoy it.
This course prepares the students for undergraduate academic reading. The students learn how to write longer summaries, critically analyze text, and develop context specific vocabulary. Students will also be taught such skills as recognizing topic sentences, supporting details, and the outline used in paragraphs and essays, as well as getting meaning from context, the significance of punctuation, and the importance of parts of speech. Students begin reading with natural intonation. Students participate in class discussion about what they have read. The students do extensive reading to build reading fluency. A deeper interaction with undergraduate textbooks is conducted in preparation for undergraduate studies. The different parts of an academic journal are learned so students are more prepared for academic research, and they will also learn how to navigate the library for such research.
This course prepares students for grammar necessary in the undergraduate classroom. The final past time verb tenses are studied, and a comparison of verb tenses is conducted. There is a more in depth look at modals, pronouns, dependent clauses, and infinitives and gerunds. The new grammatical concept learned in this course is the passive voice. Emphasis is put on the importance of grammar function for academic writing purposes. Students use an online corpus to find grammatical patterns.
ESL 033 Writing III assists students in getting ready for undergraduate writing through application of grammar knowledge, integration of credible sources, development of writing fluency, and discovery of identity as an English writer. Students are exposed to different kinds of writing styles and genres, but will primarily focus on essay production.
Students focus on preparing their listening and speaking skills for the undergraduate classroom through participation in a variety of authentic listening and speaking situations— academic lectures, note taking, class discussions, debates, role play, real life occurrences, presentations and speeches. Students have the opportunity to observe undergraduate courses in order to do a final self-assessment of their academic listening skills and readiness for the undergraduate classroom. To improve pronunciation, students work with American Speechsounds software on phonetic sounds at the phrase and sentence level. To become a more natural and fluent listener and speaker; linking, reductions, and emotional expression are studied within the framework of intonation.
A higher level of language production is expected of the students as they explore themes of American culture. Students give presentations related to pieces of American culture using pertinent technology. Service learning is conducted at local destinations such as convalescent homes and public schools to better understand culture within these places and increase students’ sense of global citizenship, and students in this course take a leadership role on these service learning trips. Field trips focused on American culture and history are frequently taken to give students practical exposure and experience. Students are required to participate in at least one club for full involvement and integration into campus life. At times, guest speakers visit the classroom to shed light on any given topic related to American culture and history.

Exercise/Sport Studies

Designed to provide the skills and appreciation of recreational sports that can benefit individuals during both their college and postcollege days. A maximum of nine semester credits in activity credits will be allowed toward the bachelor’s degree. An activity course can be taken only one time for credit. The activity classes are offered in the following areas: Aerobics, Badminton, Fishing, Volleyball, Basketball, Golf, Walking for Fitness, Biking, Water Aerobics, Physical Conditioning, Weight Training, Soccer.
Designed to provide the skills and appreciation of recreational sports that can benefit individuals during both their college and postcollege days. A maximum of nine semester credits in activity credits will be allowed toward the bachelor’s degree. An activity course can be taken only one time for credit. The activity classes are offered in the following areas: Aerobics, Badminton, Fishing, Volleyball, Basketball, Golf, Walking for Fitness, Biking, Water Aerobics, Physical Conditioning, Weight Training, Soccer.
Designed to provide the skills and appreciation of recreational sports that can benefit individuals during both their college and postcollege days. A maximum of nine semester credits in activity credits will be allowed toward the bachelor’s degree. An activity course can be taken only one time for credit. The activity classes are offered in the following areas: Aerobics, Badminton, Fishing, Volleyball, Basketball, Golf, Walking for Fitness, Biking, Water Aerobics, Physical Conditioning, Weight Training, Soccer.
Designed to provide the skills and appreciation of recreational sports that can benefit individuals during both their college and postcollege days. A maximum of nine semester credits in activity credits will be allowed toward the bachelor’s degree. An activity course can be taken only one time for credit. The activity classes are offered in the following areas: Aerobics, Badminton, Fishing, Volleyball, Basketball, Golf, Walking for Fitness, Biking, Water Aerobics, Physical Conditioning, Weight Training Soccer.
Designed to provide the skills and appreciation of recreational sports that can benefit individuals during both their college and postcollege days. A maximum of nine semester credits in activity credits will be allowed toward the bachelor’s degree. An activity course can be taken only one time for credit. The activity classes are offered in the following areas: Aerobics, Badminton, Fishing, Volleyball, Basketball, Golf, Walking for Fitness, Biking, Water Aerobics, Physical Conditioning, Weight Training, Soccer.
Designed to provide the skills and appreciation of recreational sports that can benefit individuals during both their college and postcollege days. A maximum of nine semester credits in activity credits will be allowed toward the bachelor’s degree. An activity course can be taken only one time for credit. The activity classes are offered in the following areas: Aerobics, Badminton, Fishing, Volleyball, Basketball, Golf, Walking for Fitness, Biking, Water Aerobics, Physical Conditioning, Weight Training, Soccer.
Designed to provide the skills and appreciation of recreational sports that can benefit individuals during both their college and postcollege days. A maximum of nine semester credits in activity credits will be allowed toward the bachelor’s degree. An activity course can be taken only one time for credit. The activity classes are offered in the following areas: Aerobics, Badminton, Fishing, Volleyball, Basketball, Golf, Walking for Fitness, Biking, Water Aerobics, Physical Conditioning, Weight Training, Soccer.
Designed to provide the skills and appreciation of recreational sports that can benefit individuals during both their college and postcollege days. A maximum of nine semester credits in activity credits will be allowed toward the bachelor’s degree. An activity course can be taken only one time for credit. The activity classes are offered in the following areas: Aerobics, Badminton, Fishing, Volleyball, Basketball, Golf, Walking for Fitness, Biking, Water Aerobics, Physical Conditioning, Weight Training, Soccer.
Designed to provide the skills and appreciation of recreational sports that can benefit individuals during both their college and postcollege days. A maximum of nine semester credits in activity credits will be allowed toward the bachelor’s degree. An activity course can be taken only one time for credit. The activity classes are offered in the following areas: Aerobics, Badminton, Fishing, Volleyball, Basketball, Golf, Walking for Fitness, Biking, Water Aerobics, Physical Conditioning, Weight Training, Soccer.
Designed to provide the skills and appreciation of recreational sports that can benefit individuals during both their college and postcollege days. A maximum of nine semester credits in activity credits will be allowed toward the bachelor’s degree. An activity course can be taken only one time for credit. The activity classes are offered in the following areas: Aerobics, Badminton, Fishing, Volleyball, Basketball, Golf, Walking for Fitness, Biking, Water Aerobics, Physical Conditioning, Weight Training, Soccer.
Designed to provide the skills and appreciation of recreational sports that can benefit individuals during both their college and postcollege days. A maximum of nine semester credits in activity credits will be allowed toward the bachelor’s degree. An activity course can be taken only one time for credit. The activity classes are offered in the following areas: Aerobics, Badminton, Fishing, Volleyball, Basketball, Golf, Walking for Fitness, Biking, Water Aerobics, Physical Conditioning, Weight Training, Soccer.
Designed to provide the skills and appreciation of recreational sports that can benefit individuals during both their college and postcollege days. A maximum of nine semester credits in activity credits will be allowed toward the bachelor’s degree. An activity course can be taken only one time for credit. The activity classes are offered in the following areas: Aerobics, Badminton, Fishing, Volleyball, Basketball, Golf, Walking for Fitness, Biking, Water Aerobics, Physical Conditioning, Weight Training, Soccer.
Careers are examined in the fields of health, physical education and recreation. An overview is given of the philosophy, purposes and principles in the fields related to physical education, recreation, coaching and training.
This course gives individuals in the workplace the knowledge and skills necessary to recognize and provide basic care for injuries and sudden illnesses, including using an automated external defibrillator (AED) for victims of sudden cardiac arrest, until advanced medical personnel arrive and take over.
A basic orientation to the water. The student will demonstrate proficiency in the four basic strokes by swimming 50 yards in freestyle, side stroke, breast stroke and back stroke. The course equips students with basic water safety skills and knowledge, allowing them to be reasonably safe in or about the water.
This course presents the rules and mechanics of officiating football, basketball, baseball, softball, volleyball and wrestling. Included are the qualifications for approval and certification in the Iowa High School Athletic Association and the Iowa Girls High School Athletic Union.
This course provides theory and practice in movement education. Developmentally appropriate individual and group gymnastics and dance activities will be presented and practiced in class.
An overview of programming elements and techniques in recreational sports. Topics include informal, intramural, club and extramural programming; values of recreational sports; programming techniques; publicity and promotion; facility utilization; equipment; and safety and liability.
In this course, students will develop an understanding of the differences between team and individual sports. The focus will be on gaining practical knowledge of most sports offered in a high school athletic or physical education setting, to include history, rules, court dimensions, fundamentals, basic strategies, equipment, and safety precautions.
This course is designed to develop medical terminology language skills. Learners will demonstrate knowledge of word construction, definitions and use of terms related to all areas of health science. The course includes a basic understanding of anatomy of the human body, functions of health and disease, and the use of language in health careers. The use of medical dictionaries, Internet sites, and other modern technologies will be introduced.
The purpose of this instructor course is to train instructor candidates to teach American Red Cross swimming and water safety courses.
Prerequisites
EXSS 102, EXSS 105, Or evidence of having passed level 5 of the Red Cross Learn to Swim Program
The primary purpose of the American Red Cross lifeguarding program is to provide lifeguard candidates and lifeguards with the skills and knowledge necessary to keep the patrons of aquatic facilities safe in and around the water. Red Cross certification is available to those who qualify.
Prerequisites
EXSS 102, EXSS 105, Or evidence of having passed level 5 of the Red Cross Learn to Swim Program
Contemporary sport is struggling to find solid ethical ground. This course will investigate multiple aspects of sport ethics through a review of a wide range of literature in sport.
This course is an introduction to the five components of physical fitness including cardiorespiratory endurance, muscular endurance muscular strength, flexibility and body composition. Emphasis will be placed on individualized analysis of physical fitness and development of an exercise prescription program. Other topics to be explored are the physiological foundations of exercise, structure, and function of the body and principles of physical training and conditioning.
This course explores the theory and methods of coaching sports, covering the technical, administrative and organizational aspects of the process. Emphasis is placed on the fundamentals, tactics, conditioning and conducting of practice sessions.
A study of deviations from normal patterns of growth and development, including methods of recognizing physical divergences, screening and referral for further examination. In addition, adaptive exercises and activities for prevention and correction of deviations are reviewed.
This course explores the theory and methods of coaching sports and the ethical and legal responsibilities of coaches. The course covers the technical, administrative, and organizational aspects of the process, including fundamentals, tactics, conditioning and conducting practices sessions. It also covers ethical scenarios and how these issues can be reduced, eliminated, or resolved and the importance of educating coaches, student-athletes, and other stakeholders regarding appropriate ethics. This course meets the coaching and ethics requirement for the State of Iowa coaching authorization and coaching endorsement.
This course covers special topics not covered by current courses taught in the department. The particular topic is to be determined by the department according to the current need and interest. This course requires department chair approval.
A study of personal health care, health practices and attitudes as related to the individual, school setting and general public. Topics include: consumer health awareness, health practices, consumer practices, aging, stress, cancer, drugs, mental health, sexuality and various diseases.
This course will focus on basic concepts of nutrition in respect to the needs of athletes and physically active individuals and application of those concepts. Topics include functions of food and nutrients, principles of metabolism and digestion, hydration and electrolyte balance, dietary planning, body composition, dietary changes to enhance performance, current trends in sport nutrition, and supplements and ergogenc aids.
The purpose of the course is to educate students of the ethical and legal responsibilities they have when they receive their coaching authorization certification or teaching-coaching certification in the State of Iowa.
This course provides knowledge and fundamental application for developing programming to improve the health and fitness levels of future clients. Topics include basic human anatomy, exercise physiology, applied kinesiology and nutrition principles; fitness and health assessment techniques; components of program design for improving flexibility, balance, core function, cardiovascular fitness, muscular endurance and strength and sports performance; professional and legal responsibilities; and skills for communicating and building rapport with clients. Successful completion of the course objectives prepares the student to sit for multiple national fitness certifications.
A study of the human physiology parameters as related to physical activity and work. Included is the development of fitness factors to provide a more well-defined personal fitness program.
Prerequisites
BIO 268 or BIO 275
A study of the anatomical and mechanical considerations involved in movement in an athletic or physical education setting. The last half of the course requires the application of biomechanical principles in the analysis of sport skills.
Prerequisites
BIO 268 or BIO 270
This course is an examination of major psychological theories and research related to sport and exercise participation and performance. It is designed to introduce students to the field of sport and exercise psychology by providing an overview of topics, such as personality, motivation, coaching and leadership strategies, team dynamics, performance enhancing strategies, and gender and cultural issues.
Prerequisites
PSY 190
This course will present comprehensive evaluation of legal principles and cases surrounding the administration of athletic programs. The purpose of the course is to introduce the student to areas of the legal system that impact the policies and procedures developed by athletic administrators. The course will also allow students to become familiar with necessary legal vocabulary and precedent setting cases which have played major roles in the progression of Sport Law. The course is designed to provide students with learning experiences that will equip them to identify potential areas of liability in athletic programs and approach them with viable, preventative solutions and strategies to lessen these potential areas of liability.
Students in this course will study human growth and development related to the physical education of children in elementary, middle, and high school. Emphasis is placed on the impact of developmental movement experiences, curriculum, teacher behavior, class management, dance activities, play environments, materials, and developmentally appropriate activities. Same as EDU 336
Prerequisites
EDU 110, EDU 319, And admittance to the Teacher Education Program
This course is a study of methods, materials, curriculum development with an emphasis on nutrition , safety and healthy lifestyle. Included is information for use in health activities and presentations for students in elementary, middle, and high school. It provides information on current health legislation and public policy. Same as EDU 337
Prerequisites
EDU 110, EDU 319, And admittance to the Teacher Education Program
This course will provide an overview of diversity, description and details of the various forms of diversity and information and examples of how to effectively manage diversity in sport organizations.
Prerequisites
EXSS 101
In this course students will develop an understanding of strength training. The focus will be on gaining an understanding of safety, room layout, equipment, how muscles develop (physically and chemically) and strategies of strength training.
An examination of factors that affect the acquisition and performance of motor skills. Topics include perception, psychomotor learning, practice methods and theories of neuromuscular integration.
Prerequisites
BIO/ EXSS 268 or BIO 270, and junior or senior status
This course is intended to provide an undersanding of the administration of secondary physical education programs with an emphasis on class and extracurricular activities. It will also teach prospective physical education teachers how to assess students' physical, social, mental and cognitive abilities in the classroom and extracurricular activities.
This course introduces students to research in sport administration, ethical issues related to research projects, the step by step process to address research questions, common research designs used in sport administration, and the statistical methods utilized in the sport administration field.
Prerequisites
EXSS 100, EXSS 430, MATH 220
This course covers special topics not covered by current courses taught in the department. The particular topic is to be determined by the department according to the current need and interest. This course requires department chair approval.

Finance

A study of financial decisions made by individuals. Topics include: financial planning, financial management, purchasing decisions, insurance decisions, personal investing and retirement planning.
A study of the commercial banking system; thrift institutions; the Federal Reserve System; money, interest rates, savings and credit; government regulatory institutions and policies. Same as ECON 310.
Prerequisites
ECON 161
An introduction to corporate financial management. Topics include financial statement analysis, time value of money, risk and return, bond valuation, stock valuation, capital budgeting and the capital asset pricing model.
Prerequisites
ECON 161, ACCT 202, Or permission of instructor
An exploration of investing in stocks, bonds and other financial instruments; securities exchanges; financial planning; technical and fundamental analysis and market indicators.
Prerequisites
FIN 341
A study of long-term financial decisions made by managers (e.g., capital structure, dividend policy, lease-or-buy, mergers, issuance of new securities).
Prerequisites
FIN 341
This course provides a framework for analyzing the relationship between strategy and finance and methods used to value a high-growth company. New ventures are analyzed in terms of their technical, competitive, and business risks.
This course examines the mechanics of and issues associated with making loans, buying and selling securities, competing for deposits, assessing risks, building the capital base and the consequences of making bad loans, operating with excessive leverage and inadequate liquidity. It also addresses related activities involving securitization and the use of financial derivatives.
Prerequisites
FIN 341
An inquiry into the application of financial hedging tools such as options, futures, forward markets and credit derivatives as mitigating tools for managing financial and commodity risk.
Prerequisites
FIN 341
This course analyzes contemporary theories of finance as applied to management decision-making including cash flow analysis, capital budgeting, risk and return, valuation models, financial instruments, statement analysis and capital structure. Prerequisites: MBA 500 or baccalaureate degree in a business discipline or basic level of knowledge in accounting and finance.
Students will explore domestic and international financial markets and the environments in which they function with emphasis on the operation, regulation, use, and evaluation of principal financial markets and institutions. Related issues explored include monetary policy, arbitrage, and their effects on business valuation. Students will examine the choices available to finance businesses and selection of optimal capital structures.
This course introduces the student to derivative securities and their application in the context of corporate decision-making. Students will explore issues associated with the valuation, trading, hedging, and use of derivative securities covering options, swaps, forwards, and futures that are traded or negotiated. Identification and valuation of options embedded in financial and operational decisions will be explored. Students will also explore issues including the use of insurance to transfer risk and the recognition, measurement, and management of portfolio risk.
This class will examine various information technology solutions used to manage financial data/statistics and their applications. Topic coverage will include financial statement analysis, forecasting, and quantitative approaches used in conducting financial analysis.
Students will review principles of investment used to develop financial plans for individuals and businesses. Through analyses of financial forecasting in a dynamic environment, students will be prepared to create limited risk solutions. They will also examine accountability of financial managers to their clients in a volatile market.
Students will explore the financial management issues faced by organizations that operate in the global economy. The course integrates macroeconomic theory with financial theory as applied to a multinational corporation operating in the global arena.

First Year Seminar

Through an introduction and exploration of a discipline-specific topic this course continues to help students engage the learning process at UIU and beyond. During this course students will practice different processes and behaviors that support learning while exploring the UIU collegiate environment. Students will practice meeting collegiate expectations and align collegiate expectations to those of society. It is an expectation that all first-time, full-time students transferring fewer than 30 hours of college credit take the FYS course series during their first year of enrollment. The majority of the course outcomes are “common” First Year Seminar (FYS) goals. That is, all FYS sections will address, practice, and evaluate these same outcomes. However, each section of FYS will be unique in the content used to accomplish these outcomes. This structure provides first-year students with common student learning outcomes and experiences which bring students together, and the format also offers exploratory content that may serve as a guide for personal exploration of their own.
Through an introduction and exploration of a discipline-specific topic this course continues to help students engage the learning process at UIU and beyond. During this course students will practice different processes and behaviors that support learning while exploring the UIU collegiate environment. Students will practice meeting collegiate expectations and align collegiate expectations to those of society. It is an expectation that all first-time, full-time students transferring fewer than 30 hours of college credit take the FYS course series during their first year of enrollment. The majority of the course outcomes are “common” First Year Seminar (FYS) goals. That is, all FYS sections will address, practice, and evaluate these same outcomes. However, each section of FYS will be unique in the content used to accomplish these outcomes. This structure provides first-year students with common student learning outcomes and experiences which bring students together, and the format also offers exploratory content that may serve as a guide for personal exploration of their own.
Through an introduction and exploration of a discipline-specific topic this course continues to help students engage the learning process at UIU and beyond. During this course students will practice different processes and behaviors that support learning while exploring the UIU collegiate environment. Students will practice meeting collegiate expectations and align collegiate expectations to those of society. It is an expectation that all first-time, full-time students transferring fewer than 30 hours of college credit take the FYS course series during their first year of enrollment. The majority of the course outcomes are “common” First Year Seminar (FYS) goals. That is, all FYS sections will address, practice, and evaluate these same outcomes. However, each section of FYS will be unique in the content used to accomplish these outcomes. This structure provides first-year students with common student learning outcomes and experiences which bring students together, and the format also offers exploratory content that may serve as a guide for personal exploration of their own.
Through an introduction and exploration of a discipline-specific topic this course continues to help students engage the learning process at UIU and beyond. During this course students will practice different processes and behaviors that support learning while exploring the UIU collegiate environment. Students will practice meeting collegiate expectations and align collegiate expectations to those of society. It is an expectation that all first-time, full-time students transferring fewer than 30 hours of college credit take the FYS course series during their first year of enrollment. The majority of the course outcomes are “common” First Year Seminar (FYS) goals. That is, all FYS sections will address, practice, and evaluate these same outcomes. However, each section of FYS will be unique in the content used to accomplish these outcomes. This structure provides first-year students with common student learning outcomes and experiences which bring students together, and the format also offers exploratory content that may serve as a guide for personal exploration of their own.
Through an introduction and exploration of a discipline-specific topic this course continues to help students engage the learning process at UIU and beyond. During this course students will practice different processes and behaviors that support learning while exploring the UIU collegiate environment. Students will practice meeting collegiate expectations and align collegiate expectations to those of society. It is an expectation that all first-time, full-time students transferring fewer than 30 hours of college credit take the FYS course series during their first year of enrollment. The majority of the course outcomes are “common” First Year Seminar (FYS) goals. That is, all FYS sections will address, practice, and evaluate these same outcomes. However, each section of FYS will be unique in the content used to accomplish these outcomes. This structure provides first-year students with common student learning outcomes and experiences which bring students together, and the format also offers exploratory content that may serve as a guide for personal exploration of their own.
Through an introduction and exploration of a discipline-specific topic this course continues to help students engage the learning process at UIU and beyond. During this course students will practice different processes and behaviors that support learning while exploring the UIU collegiate environment. Students will practice meeting collegiate expectations and align collegiate expectations to those of society. It is an expectation that all first-time, full-time students transferring fewer than 30 hours of college credit take the FYS course series during their first year of enrollment. The majority of the course outcomes are “common” First Year Seminar (FYS) goals. That is, all FYS sections will address, practice, and evaluate these same outcomes. However, each section of FYS will be unique in the content used to accomplish these outcomes. This structure provides first-year students with common student learning outcomes and experiences which bring students together, and the format also offers exploratory content that may serve as a guide for personal exploration of their own.

Geography

This course provides a framework for understanding the aerial and spatial interrelationships and processes that operate in the physical environment in order to develop a better comprehension of the physical world around us. The content of the course will examine Earth-sun relationships, latitude, longitude, maps, plus the physical factors associated with meteorology, climate, and earth surface processes.
This course provides an introduction to the basic concepts and supporting facts about contemporary world geography. Emphasis is placed upon component countries' world roles, physical and cultural characteristics, relation to other world areas and associated problems. The course examines population, economic activity, landforms, climate, cultural conflict and other pertinent natural and human processes that underlie the areal and spatial differentiation of the world.
This course introduces students to both historic and contemporary theories and techniques of cartography. Mental maps, the map as a physical object, and the mapping process are examined. Students apply techniques and tools to construction and use of maps in spatial analysis including gathering, manipulation, and representation of geographic data with an emphasis on thematic mapping and maps as a communication medium. The course covers introductory GIS, GPS, projections, and datum. Mapping projects may involve the surrounding community.
Prerequisites
GEOG 100 or GEOG 200 recommended
Geographic information systems (GIS) are an increasingly important analysis tool in many fields. In this hands-on course, students develop spatial reasoning ability and sharpen their skills in analyzing spatial data. Topics covered include principles of storing, analyzing and displaying spatial data; procurement of spatial information, and data manipulation and display techniques. Students will learn practical applications of GIS and the use of common spatial analytical techniques.
Prerequisites
CS 102, Or consent of instructor
Students will apply spatial analytical techniques and modeling to geographical problem solving in business, urban planning, natural resource management, and other fields.
Prerequisites
GEOG 356, Or consent of instructor
An understanding of the principles of remote sensing requires knowledge of the electromagnetic spectrum, interactions of electromagnetic energy with the atmosphere and Earth’s surface, and remote sensing sensors and platforms. Students will learn to accurately interpret aerial photographs and to procure and process satellite imagery for use in mapping and decision support. Applications of GIS and remote sensing will include global monitoring, agriculture, and oceanography.
Prerequisites
GEOG 356, Or consent of instructor
Students will utilize scripting and other techniques to perform spatial analysis, automate tasks and develop custom extensions. These techniques and capabilities are an essential foundation for more powerful analyses, efficient data pre-processing, and developing user interfaces and tools to provide access to GIS functionality to non-expert users across an organization.
Prerequisites
GEOG 356, Or consent of instructor

Graphic Design

This course is an introduction to the theories and principles of graphic design. Student learners will explore the role of visual elements and design practices in various cultural, historical and material contexts, and will learn to evaluate design critically. This course requires use of professional editing software that may need to be purchased by students or accessed via lab fee.
Digital photography processes and techniques that include image capture with digital cameras, digital editing in Photoshop, and image presentation in web-based and color print formats. Fieldwork emphasizes capturing artistic subjects in natural light and natural settings. Lab work includes optimizing resolution and editing for content and aesthetics. Students are expected to supply their own HD digital cameras (other than cell phones). Students create and share individual portfolios of original work that meet professional standards. This course requires use of professional editing software that may need to be purchased by students or accessed via lab fee.
Acquaints the beginning designer with the basic principles, terminology and methods used to solve graphic design problems and explores the integration of typography and visual elements to communicate ideas. Students learn to understand and evaluate information and learn the value of research in creating design solutions. Assignments are devised to emphasize and encourage conceptual thinking. Students create and share individual portfolios of original work that meet professional standards. This course requires use of professional editing software that may need to be purchased by students or accessed via lab fee.
Special Topics courses are studies of selected problems, periods or movements in the subject area not otherwise included in the curriculum. They are typically chosen from a faculty member’s particular expertise and field of scholarly inquiry, and offered to a student or group of students forming an interest in the particular subject matter. The 250 designation denotes a General Education level of instruction and may include an appropriate General Education task to be completed. The 450 designation denotes a senior level degree of sophistication expected in both learning and instruction. A single course may be offered at both levels simultaneously, in which case the syllabus will clearly differentiate the course expectations and assessment measures for students enrolled at each of the two levels.
This course is an introduction to the elements and principles of web design. Students will explore the role of visual elements and design practices using professional software and social media. Students create and share individual portfolios of original work that meet professional standards. This course requires use of professional editing software that may need to be purchased by students or accessed via lab fee.
Digital video processes and techniques that include HD video capture with digital cameras, digital editing, and presentation in web-based and HD formats. Fieldwork emphasizes capturing artistic subjects in natural light and natural settings. Lab work includes editing for content and aesthetics. Students must provide their own cameras with HD video capability (other than cellphones). Students create and share individual portfolios of original work that meet professional standards. This course requires use of professional editing software that may need to be purchased by students or accessed via lab fee.
This course emphasizes digital techniques used to create and manipulate bitmap photographs and graphics in an artistic context. Students create a portfolio of work that demonstrates competency in editing, color correction, managing digital formats, conceptual thinking, and refinement of design. Students create and share individual portfolios of original work that meet professional standards. This course requires use of professional editing software that may need to be purchased by students or accessed via lab fee.
Prerequisites
At least one 100-level or 200-level art or graphic design course.
Survey of graphic design history with emphasis on the processes of cultural production explored within specific historical contexts.
Prerequisites
ART 100, ART 211, ART 212 or GRAF 112
Students learn to use appropriate materials, tools and techniques needed to show effective idea development and presentation methods required at the various stages of design problem solving. Students develop style guides to completed comprehensive presentations of several multi-page projects. Students create and share individual portfolios of original work that meet professional standards. This course requires use of professional editing software that may need to be purchased by students or accessed via lab fee.
Prerequisites
At least one 100-level or 200-level art or graphic design course
Essential experience in the craft of typography and type specification. Students develop a full understanding of the terminology used by typographers and learn to work with type intelligently and creatively. Research into the history of type design and exploration of the symbolism inherent in different typefaces and their relationship to other graphic elements. Students may not receive credit for both ART 251 and GRAF 355. Students create and share individual portfolios of original work that meet professional standards. This course requires use of professional editing software that may need to be purchased by students or accessed via lab fee.
This course emphasizes digital techniques used to create vector illustrations and enhance visual representation of information graphics, maps, and logos in an artistic context. Students create a portfolio of work that demonstrates competency of the Bezier tool, color matching, digital formats, conceptual thinking, and refinement of design. Students create and share individual portfolios of original work that meet professional standards. This course requires use of professional editing software that may need to be purchased by students or accessed via lab fee.
Prerequisites
At least one 100-level or 200-level art or graphic design course
This course emphasizes digital techniques used to create web-based animated illustrations and graphics in an artistic context. Students create a portfolio of work that demonstrates competency in drawing, storyboarding, managing layers and timelines, digital formats, conceptual thinking, and refinement of design..Students create and share individual portfolios of original work that meet professional standards. This course requires use of professional editing software that may need to be purchased by students or accessed via lab fee.
Prerequisites
At least one 100-level or 200-level art or graphic design course
Special Topics courses are studies of selected problems, periods or movements in the subject area not otherwise included in the curriculum. They are typically chosen from a faculty member’s particular expertise and field of scholarly inquiry, and offered to a student or group of students forming an interest in the particular subject matter. The 250 designation denotes a General Education level of instruction and may include an appropriate General Education task to be completed. The 450 designation denotes a senior level degree of sophistication expected in both learning and instruction. A single course may be offered at both levels simultaneously, in which case the syllabus will clearly differentiate the course expectations and assessment measures for students enrolled at each of the two levels.
This course emphasizes advanced web design techniques used to create innovative design solutions and interactivity in an artistic context. Students demonstrate an understanding of historical design styles and philosophies while refining work in print and digital formats. Students create and share individual portfolios of original work that meet professional standards. GRAF 480 fulfills the capstone requirement for the Graphic Design major and minor. This course requires use of professional editing software that may need to be purchased by students or accessed via lab fee. Prerequisite: To prepare for GRAF 480, students must successfully complete all of the major/minor required studio courses, with the exception of GRAF 480 and no more than one other, and retain design projects from their previous courses that can be repurposed for their Senior Portfolios.

Health Services Administration

A macro-level examination of the origin, structure and operation of the American health system and its subsystems and components. Topics include the hospital system, public health system, long-term care systems, financing system, health services delivery systems, healthcare providers and contemporary issues confronting the American Health System
This course will provide student experience in a collaborative service-learning framework. Students will be expected to exhibit the skills to work with an interdisciplinary team, communicate efficiently, comprehend cultural and social factors that influence patients, and work effectively with community service organizations.
Prerequisites
HSA 205
This course provides an overview of health informatics and data analytics as it relates to managing health services organizations. Health informatics principles and policies will be covered including health data content, collection, quality, access, and retention. The challenges faced by health services administrators related to health informatics including strategic plan alignment, governance, planning initiatives, and assessing and achieving value will also be discussed.
Prerequisites
CS 102, HSA 205, Or consent of instructor
An examination of the origins, organization and operations of managed care programs, including the structures, practice models, roles of clinicians, capitation, and health services payment systems.
Prerequisites
HSA 205
An examination of the origins, organization and operations of long-term care facilities such as assisted living homes, hospice and nursing homes. Topics include the continuum of long-term care, and the role and relationship of various long-term care facilities and programs to acute care and the American Health System.
Prerequisites
HSA 205
An examination of the origin, structure and issues relating to the provision of community and public health services. Topics include an introduction to epidemiology, community needs assessment, social and cultural influences on utilization of community and public health services and the problems related to community and public health.
Prerequisites
HSA 205
This course provides an overview of methods of teaching for successful learning. A wide variety of teaching/learning styles and assessment strategies will guide dental hygienists to provide effective education in patient care and in dental hygiene educational settings.
Prerequisites
HSA 240
Examines population health management focusing on strategies to improve health and quality of care with an emphasis on cost control management.
Prerequisites
MATH 220 or HSA 241 or consent of instructor
This course is designed to provide an introduction to legal and ethical issues related to the operations of health services organizations. Topics will include an examination of major ethical theories, ethics and compliance laws, HIPAA, DNR orders, living wills, power of attorney, informed consent, and an overview of the legal system as it relates to health services delivery.
Prerequisites
HSA 205
An analysis of the financial management of health services organizations and issues related to the financial management of health services organizations, particularly acute care facilities such as hospitals. Topics include the economic analysis of public and private financing, health insurance, and other forms of health services payment.
Prerequisites
ACCT 201, BA 210
An examination of the legal issues related to the operation of health services organizations, including contracts, licensure, informed consent, tort, medical staff appointments and an overview of the legal system as it related to health services delivery.
Prerequisites
PS 100
An analysis of the structure and operation of various types of health services organizations, including their internal departments, and management of the facilities with particular emphasis on acute care facilities.
Prerequisites
BA 210
An examination of the regulatory environment and health policy formation process at the federal, state and local levels. Topics include the historical process of key health legislation such as Medicare and Medicaid, cost controls, regulatory compliance and oversight, utilization review, prospective payment system, value based purchasing, and political factors related to formulation and implementation of health policy.
This course correlates with HSA 330 Teaching Methodology, which provides an overview of teaching techniques for successful learning. A wide variety of teaching/learning styles and assessment strategies will guide dental hygienists to provide effective education to various audiences in patient care and in dental hygiene educational settings. This course requires students to observe, perform, and apply teaching methodologies for useful education in variable settings; in didactic and/or clinical dental hygiene educational programs or approved alternate sites such as private practice, public health, and professional mentoring situations.
Prerequisites
HSA 330
An examination of the major concepts, methodologies and issues related to the planning and evaluation of health services delivery programs. Topics include internal and external validity threat, experimental, quasi-experimental and non-experimental study designs, and analysis techniques.
Prerequisites
HSA 362

Higher Education Admin

This course examines the history, philosophy, purpose and functions of student affairs in a variety of higher education settings. Students will review topical areas: student services, issues, problems as well as implementing, managing and evaluating student affairs programs in college settings.
This course will assist present and future administrators to apply sensitivity and help with ethical and legal decision making in higher education. Issues include student, faculty, and classroom discrimination, equity, due process, disabilities, compliance, and academic freedom.
This course analyzes the role of the student affairs professional and the process by which development occurs. Theories of human development and learning, strategies for advising and retaining traditional and nontraditional learners are examined.
This course addresses the characteristics of fundamental reform and transformational change impacting leadership, administration, organization, and governance in contemporary higher education. An examination of the role of leadership in institutions of higher learning, including style, knowledge of the position, self-knowledge, personal characteristics, and ability to effectively initiate change, will be described. Unique challenges and opportunities effecting governance and organization in a global, market-oriented, competitive system of higher education will be analyzed.
An examination of higher education finance and budgeting systems, practices and issues. Topics include revenues vs. expenditures, cost vs. productivity, the role of the public sector, student issues and budgeting.
This course examines the complex political systems that shape higher education. Political actors include legislatures, interest groups, professional organizations, governmental analysts, and employee unions. Topics include accreditation, tuition, and affirmative action. Explores how to shape political options.
This course explores in depth critical and current issues in the field of higher education from the perspective of administrator and addresses how these critical issues impact two-year, four-year, public, private, for-profit and not-for-profit institutions.
A survey of the theories and best practices of strategic planning and decision making in higher education. Provides students with major studies and models. Includes implementation techniques and outcomes evaluation, the impact of futuristic technologies, emerging new providers of higher education, and accreditation bodies.
This course is an examination of higher education assessment and accreditation practices and the utilization of quality principles for continuous improvement. Topics include assessment models, assessment practices, quality in higher education, the quality principles and using the quality principles for continuous improvement.

History

This course provides a broad overview of world history, beginning with the development of agriculture in Neolithic times and ending with the Protestant Reformation in the 16th century. Major topics include ancient civilizations of Mesopotamia, Egypt, Indus Valley and Yellow River Valley; classical Greece; Roman Empire; development of Hinduism, Judaism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Taoism, Christianity and Islam; China and Japan through the 16th century; feudal Europe; the Renaissance; African societies; and pre-Columbian America and Reformation. Meets the social science requirement.
This course is a continuation of HIST 100 and provides a broad overview of world history, beginning with European expansion over the globe in the 16th century and extending through the present. Major themes examined are colonization, slavery, the Industrial Revolution, imperialism, worldwide conflicts, East vs. West, decolonization and the collapse of communism. Meets the social science requirement.
This course provides a broad overview of U.S. history, from the earliest colonial settlements through the end of the Reconstruction period following the Civil War. Major themes examined are colonial society and life, the struggle for independence, adoption of the Constitution, the early national period, sectionalism, the Civil War and Reconstruction. Meets the social science requirement.
This course is a continuation of HIST 110 and provides a broad overview of U.S. history from the end of the Reconstruction period following the Civil War through the present. Major themes examined are industrialization, urbanization, protest and reform movements, emergence of the U.S. as a world power, the Great Depression, World War II, the Cold War, the turbulent 1960s, and domestic and foreign problems of the 1970s and 1980s.
This course examines the causes, military struggles, home fronts, and consequences of both World War I and World War II. Other topics covered include the Holocaust, the rise of Nazism in Germany, Fascism in Italy, communism in the Soviet Union and Japanese militarism.
This course surveys Wisconsin’s past, and focuses on the social history of its diverse peoples. It begins with the era prior to European exploration, and ends in the 1990s. Learners will be introduced to the “Wisconsin Character” concept. Meets the social science requirement.
This course is designed to introduce students to the political, economic, and social forces that have shaped Iowa history from settlement to present. Meets the social science requirement.
This course will examine historical events and the impact they have had on a specific community or regional area of the United States. Meets the social science requirement.
This course examines how women all over the world have countered their low status and power with activism that advances the cause of global feminism. The course takes a cross cultural perspective covering women from different ethnicities, religions, backgrounds, sexual preferences, races, etc. The course will discuss women’s activism as both local and national concepts and how that activism translates into an emerging global feminism that both unites women on like issues and separates them on individual cultural issues. For the most part, this course will have a twentieth and twenty-first century focus.
Special Topics courses are studies of selected problems, periods or movements in the subject area not otherwise included in the curriculum. They are typically chosen from a faculty member’s particular expertise and field of scholarly inquiry, and offered to a student or group of students forming an interest in the particular subject matter. The 250 designation denotes a General Education level of instruction and may include an appropriate General Education task to be completed. The 450 designation denotes a senior level degree of sophistication expected in both learning and instruction. A single course may be offered at both levels simultaneously, in which case the syllabus will clearly differentiate the course expectations and assessment measures for students enrolled at each of the two levels. A Special Topics course must be approved by the School of Arts and Science Curriculum Committee before it is offered, and it must address one or more Major Outcomes within the discipline.
This course is designed to introduce students to the craft of doing history. Instead of learning about what happened in the past, this course teaches students how to research and write about historical events, including learning and understanding the various interpretations of history or historiography. Topics covered include using research tools, evaluating primary and secondary sources, proper documentation, good writing, objectivity, critical thinking, and historiography. Prerequisites: sophomore status, history majors and minors only or consent of instructor.
A study of major landmarks in the growth and development of Western Economics; the evolution of agriculture, industry, transportation and finance; the influence of government and international determinants. Note: Same as ECON 281
This course explores the political, economic, intellectual, social, and cultural history of China and Japan from the late 19th century through the present.
Prerequisites
Junior status or special permission from instructor.
This course examines the experiences of African Americans in the United States from the colonial era to the present. Topics to be covered include the Trans-Atlantic slave trade; the development of slavery; slave culture; black abolition and northern black life: the Civil War and the black war effort; emancipation and the freedmen’s community; Reconstruction; disfranchisement and segregation; Booker T. Washington and W.E.B. DuBois; black institution building; the Second World War and the black war effort; black protest movements and the civil rights era; and an assessment of the current state of blacks in American life.
A survey of U.S. foreign relations from colonial time to the present, with emphasis on the constitutional, institutional and political factors shaping the formation and execution of American diplomacy. Same as PS 342
Prerequisites
PS 100
This course provides a survey of the major themes and events in the history of women in the United States from colonial settlement to the present. Particular attention is given to how women’s experiences in the family, the work place and the political arena have been shaped and molded by persistent cultural ideals and by class and race.
Prerequisites
HIST 110
This course provides a specialized examination of world history in the Twentieth Century.
Prerequisites
HIST 101
This course examines the causes, consequences, and inter-relatedness of the American, French, Haitian, and Spanish-American Revolutions from roughly 1763 to 1840. Topics covered include rights, slavery, social justice, political philosophy, and colonialism.
Prerequisites
HIST 101 or HIST 110
This course covers the era of the New Nation, 1787-1848. It has three sections: the first covers the Early National Era, including the creation of a new government at the Constitutional Convention, the rise of political parties, and the early challenges for America’s first presidents; the second covers the era of the Market Revolution, including the second war with Britain and the beginning of the Industrial Revolution; the third covers the antebellum era, including the growth of slavery and social reform. The course will focus on the social, political, cultural, and economic aspects of the time periods covered.
Prerequisites
HIST 110
This course covers the pivotal period of the Civil War and Reconstruction, approximately 1848 to 1877. This course will cover the military, political, economic, social, and cultural events that worked to define the history of America during this period. This course is divided into three parts: The Sectional Conflict, The Civil War, and Reconstruction.
Prerequisites
HIST 110
This course focuses on American History from 1877 to 1914, focusing on the Industrial Revolution and subsequent Progressive reform movements. Other themes include the rise of Jim Crow, Populism, imperialism, urbanization, immigration, westward expansion, and American socialism.
Prerequisites
HIST 111
This course provides specialized study of the historical period examined in the second half of HIST 111. Topics include World War II, the Cold War, the Civil Rights movement, Vietnam, Watergate, stagflation, the 1980s and contemporary American life.
Prerequisites
HIST 111
Special Topics courses are studies of selected problems, periods or movements in the subject area not otherwise included in the curriculum. They are typically chosen from a faculty member’s particular expertise and field of scholarly inquiry, and offered to a student or group of students forming an interest in the particular subject matter. The 250 designation denotes a General Education level of instruction and may include an appropriate General Education task to be completed. The 450 designation denotes a senior level degree of sophistication expected in both learning and instruction. A single course may be offered at both levels simultaneously, in which case the syllabus will clearly differentiate the course expectations and assessment measures for students enrolled at each of the two levels. A Special Topics course must be approved by the School of Arts and Sciences Curriculum Committee before it is offered, and it must address one or more Major Outcomes within the discipline.
This course is the capstone course for the History major. Students will research and write original essays on a topic of their choosing.
Prerequisites
Senior standing; History majors only.

Honors

This course will ask students to engage in their academic experience, and thus is focused on critical thinking, identity, and critical and cultural literacy. The purpose of the Honors Freshman Seminar is to encourage students to become considered, thoughtful, and purposeful members of a community of learners, while challenging them to consider how they receive, process, and analyze the information they are confronted with every day. This class asks students to examine their own critical thinking process, and nurture an awareness of their individual learning process as well as their place in the world.
This course examines selected topics and traditions within the Arts and Humanities. The specific content of the course will depend on which of the General Education tasks the course meets. The selected subjects will vary from year to year depending on the themes of respective honors cohort.
This course examines selected topics within the Behavioral Sciences. The course will meet the Behavioral Science General Education Task, but the specific content of the course will vary from year to year depending upon the faculty teaching the course.
This course examines selected topics within the Natural Sciences. The course will meet the Natural Sciences General Education Task, but the specific content of the course will vary from year to year depending upon the faculty teaching the course.
This course requires students to recognize and evaluate issues from a variety of cultural contexts and propose creative and culturally relevant solutions to those issues. The course will meet the Cultures general education task, but the specific content of the course will vary from year to year depending upon the faculty teaching the course.
This course prepares students to carry out interdisciplinary research. Topics include information literacy and an introduction to research methods in multiple disciplines. The course culminates in the creation of a proposal for research.
Prerequisites
Sophomore status and Honors standing
This semester-long course is for junior and senior honors students to work on the individual interdisciplinary projects each will present as part of the Honors Senior Symposium (HON 499). This course is taken on a pass/fail basis only and may be repeated for up to three total credits.
Prerequisites
HON 220
This semester-long course is the capstone course for the Honors Program, culminating in a public presentation of a student’s Senior Honors Project. This course is taken on a pass/fail basis only
Prerequisites
HON 399

Information Systems

This course discusses how computer-based technologies and tools can most effectively contribute to business processes and methods. The course covers a systematic methodology for analyzing a business problem or opportunity, determining what role computer-based technologies can play in addressing the business need and articulating business requirements for the technology solution via in-house development, development from third-party providers, or purchased commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) packages.
Prerequisites
BA 222, CS 130, Or consent of instructor
This course explores the design, selection, implementation and management of enterprise IT solutions. The focus is on applications and infrastructure and their fit with the business model including frameworks and strategies for infrastructure management, system administration, data/information architecture, content management, distributed computing, middleware, legacy system integration, system consolidation, software selection, total cost of ownership calculation, IT investment analysis, and emerging technologies.
Prerequisites
BA 222, CS 332 (corequisite) and IS 310
This course is an introduction to key concepts and approaches to business process management and improvement. The course covers how to identify, document, model, assess, manage and improve core business processes using information technology. The course also covers the technology challenges and approaches to organizational change, domestic and offshore outsourcing, and interorganizational processes.
Prerequisites
BA 222, IS 320
This course is an introduction to the fundamental principles and topics of Information Technology Security and Risk Management at the organizational level. The course covers critical security principles that enable IS professionals to plan, develop, and perform security tasks. The course also covers hardware, software, processes, communications, applications, and policies and procedures with respect to organizational IT Security and Risk Management.
Prerequisites
IS 320
This course is an introduction to the fundamental concepts of the information technology audit and control function. The course covers information controls, the types of controls and their impact on the organization, and how to manage and audit them. The course also covers the concepts and techniques used in information technology audits, the process of creating a control structure with goals and objectives, audit an information technology infrastructure against it, and establish a systematic remediation procedure for any inadequacies.
Prerequisites
IS 320
This course explores the issues and approaches in managing the information systems in organizations and how the IS integrates, supports, and enables various types of organizational capabilities. The course uses a senior management perspective in exploring the acquisition, development and implementation of plans and policies to achieve efficient and effective information systems. The course also addresses issues relating to defining the high-level IS infrastructure and the systems that support the operational, administrative and strategic needs of the organization.
Prerequisites
BA 222, IS 320
This course explores the theoretic and practical issues related to the application of enterprise systems within organizations. The course covers how enterprise systems integrate information and organizational processes across functional areas with a unified system comprised of a single database and shared reporting tools. An integrated project, which requires the application of conceptual as well as technical (software) skills of students, will be required.
Prerequisites
IS 320
This course is part I of an introduction to the theory and concepts of information technology systems management based upon the standard best practices known as ITIL or the Information Technology Infrastructure Library. This course will descript the progression of ITIL through version 3 and cover topics from the service strategy, design, and transition to core volumes. Fundamental concepts, such as the process model based view of controlling and managing operations and BPMN business process modeling notation will also be covered.
Prerequisites
BA 222, IS 320
This course is part II of an introduction to the theory and concepts of information technology systems management based upon the standard best practices known as ITIL or the Information Technology Infrastructure Library. This course will describe topics from the ITIL service transition, operation, and continual service improvement core volumes. Advanced concepts, such as contrasting ITIL to other service management frameworks and Six Sigma will also be covered.
Prerequisites
IS 436, Or consent of instructor
In this course the student develops a project plan for a significant software system employing knowledge gained from courses throughout the program to be implemented in Capstone II. The course demonstrates the ability for the student to develop a project plan which includes the development of requirements, design of the product, implementation schedule, and quality assurance. Students may follow any suitable process model, must pay attention to quality issues, and must manage the project themselves, following all appropriate project management techniques. Success of the project is determined in large part by whether the student has adequately solved the customer’s problem.
Prerequisites
CS 400, IS 320
In this course the student implements the outcomes of the project plan outlined in Capstone I by employing knowledge gained from courses throughout the program. The course demonstrates the ability for the student to implement the details of the plan which includes the requirements, design of the product, implementation schedule, and quality assurance. Students may follow any suitable process model, must pay attention to quality issues, and must manage the project themselves following all appropriate project management techniques. Success of the project is determined in large part by whether students have adequately solved their customer’s problem.
Prerequisites
CS 400, IS 320, IS 480

Information Technology

The course introduces the student to machine to machine communication architectures for the modern computer systems. The student will be able to select, design, deploy, integrate, and administer network and communication infrastructures in an organization. In this course the student will develop a deep understanding of how networks work and how to work with them. Topics include LANs, WANs, service providers, packets, hubs, routers, switches, internet protocols, network administration and security. The course also covers the mathematical relationship of networking with trees, graphs, signal and network analysis.
Prerequisites
CS 140, CS 213, MATH 115
This course is an introduction to web technologies and systems integration. The course covers basic web design, configuration, management and security. The course also covers various P2M, M2P,and P2P, M2M communication standards and protocols and various frameworks and architectures used in web systems and system integration. Topics included are hypertext, self-descriptive text, web page design and development, web navigation systems, digital media,web services and vulnerabilities of web systems.
Prerequisites
CS 140, CS 213, CS 332
This course covers the basic knowledge needed to design current and future networks capable of providing ubiquitous high-quality support in heterogeneous environments. This course also provides an in-depth view of networking issues and solutions which strengthens the student’s understanding of fundamental concepts of network communication. Topics include the requirements and design of networks,congestion control, routing, scheduling, and overlay and wireless architectures.
Prerequisites
IT 311
This course is an introduction to the steps and techniques required for effective response to cybersecurity incidents. The course covers how to detect an incident,the actions that must be taken to mitigate harmful effects of the incident, how to identify of the vulnerabilities that led to incident, and the actions required to prevent similar occurrences in the future. The course also covers the strategies for developing appropriate security policies and procedures, as well as techniques for preserving evidence.
Prerequisites
CS 206, CS 213, IT 311
This course is an introduction to the application of networking concepts related to the management of computer networks. The course covers the general challenges faced in the management of modern data and telecommunications networks with an emphasis on data network management. The OSI and TMN compliant Network Management Packageis used as a real-world reference. Real-world examples are utilized to illustrate lecture topics and a case study/team project is researched and presented.
Prerequisites
IT 311
This is an advanced web programing course focusing on multi-tiered design on Internet applications, transactions, creating components, and Web services using the .NET framework. Client-side and server-side facilities are covered.
Prerequisites
IT 320, Or consent of instructor
This course covers emerging online technologies and trends and their influence on the electronic commerce marketplace. While the focus of this course is electronic commerce information technology, e-commerce web site planning, online store implementation, installation, administration, and security, students will be introduced to search engine prioritization concepts, web site statistics collection and analysis, online auctions, and various legal and ethical issues.
This course is an introduction to Information Assurance and Security (IAS). The course covers the knowledge required for information assurance and security and how to apply this knowledge to manage the threats against computing, communication, and organizational systems. The course also covers the frameworks to be security aware, operational issues, policies and procedures, attacks and defense mechanisms, risk analysis, and incident recovery.
Prerequisites
CS 206, CS 213, IT 311
This course is an introduction to the knowledge and implementation of attacks on systems for system security and testing purposes. The course goes into the hacker classification, the culture of hacking and cracking, social and technical attacks, and the defenses employed to counter these threats.
Prerequisites
CS 206, CS 213, IT 311

Interdisciplinary Studies

This course provides the opportunity for students to experience first-hand cultures outside the Anglo-American tradition. After initial preparation in the classroom, the class will then travel to the destination(s) being studied for a period between 7 and 21 days. Upon return, students will write a paper reflecting on the experiences and learning. The specific destination(s) and areas of academic focus will be determined by the instructor. Students will be responsible for paying all travel costs according to the payment schedule put in place by the instructor.
This course helps the student develop and strengthen the ability to reason soundly and critically. It addresses the purpose and process of critical thinking, language and critical thinking, patterns of argument, and modes of reasoning. May not be used to satisfy a humanities general education requirement.
Prerequisites
ENG 102 or ENG 202

Liberal Arts

The Associate of Arts Capstone will be taken by students seeking the Associate of Arts with a Liberal Arts Emphasis degree in their final term of coursework. Candidates for the degree will submit a portfolio and a reflection essay that addresses how their work fulfills the program’s student learning outcomes.
Prerequisites
At least 45 credits toward the completion of the Associate of Arts Liberal Art Emphasis degree.
This capstone will be taken by liberal arts majors in their senior year. Candidates will submit a portfolio and a reflection essay that addresses how their work participates in the discourse of the liberal arts.

Marketing

This course surveys the role of marketing and its place in society, in profit and not-for-profit organizations. Emphasis is placed on consumer orientation, the marketing concept, product, price, distribution and promotion. The course provides a basis of understanding for advanced marketing courses.
This course provides an introduction to the recruitment, training, motivation and management of a sales force. Included is an introduction to basic personal selling techniques. Emphasis is placed on sales as an integral element of the promotional mix.
Prerequisites
MKT 208, BA 210, Or permission of instructor
Examines the role of personal selling in the consumer and industrial marketplace. Describes selling processes and customer relations. Includes role playing and time management exercises, instruction in proper dress and field experience in sales.
Prerequisites
MKT 208, Junior Standing, Or permission of instructor
This course provides a survey of research findings on consumer behavior drawn from marketing, economics, sociology, psychology, and anthropology. Emphasis is placed on applications of research to consumer satisfaction and on developing an understanding of the consumer decision-making process.
Prerequisites
Prerequisite for Marketing majors: MKT 208 or permission of instructor. Recommended for all majors: MKT 208 and PSY 190 or SOC 110 or permission of instructor.
This course examines integrated marketing communication and its role in marketing. Included is a survey of the history of advertising, the media and communication models, and an introduction to the creative side of advertising. Emphasis is placed on the formulation of objectives for integrated marketing communication programs.
Prerequisites
MKT 208 suggested, but not required for non-marketing majors
This course will take learners through each phase of new product development-Problem/Opportunity Analysis, Ideation/Concept Generation, Concept Evaluation, Market Testing and Market Launch.
Prerequisites
MKT 208
This course builds on topics from Marketing Principles, as applied to global situations. Emphasis is on the development of an appropriate marketing mix for international target markets. The importance of consumer orientation is stressed; international marketing research, consumer behavior and cultural sensitivity are examined.
Prerequisites
MKT 358, And completion of all business core requirements
This course is an examination of the information link between organizations and the consumers they seek to serve. Emphasis is placed on developing an understanding of the nature of marketing problems, types of research available, sampling techniques, applied statistics and questionnaire formulation. The steps of the research process are explored in depth.
Prerequisites
Completion of all other marketing/business core requirements
This course description may change each session it is offered to cover the most contemporary marketing issues.
This course builds on topics from Marketing Principles and introduces students to one of the most powerful fields of study in marketing today, Branding. Emphasis is on the development of an appropriate brand strategy for current and potential target markets. Students will evaluate potential Branding opportunities addressing customer wants and needs, and they will study the processes from building a brand strategy to design, implementation, and delivering socially responsible messaging.
Prerequisites
MKT 208
This course engages students in one of the fastest growing fields in marketing today, Social Media Marketing. This course will involve elements of customer engagement and interaction in a digital environment that includes mobile media, the internet, web-based marketing, and Artificial Intelligence enhanced marketing that leverages the customer engagement process.
Prerequisites
MKT 208
This course will synthesize marketing and product development models in, but not limited to, the creation of customer value, consumer buying patterns, product innovation and development, strategy development, and the delivery of goods and services in a culturally diverse marketplace.
This course introduces students to marketing concepts used by domestic and foreign companies seeking to market products in global markets. Students will recognize the opportunities and challenges in today's international business climate and understand how these opportunities and challenges are an important factor in modern marketing strategies and planning. A marketing plan/national audit of a specific product in a specific foreign market will also be designed.

Mathematics

This course emphasizes study skills for algebra and calculator use while covering the following topics: basic algebra including real numbers, variable expressions, solving equations and equation applications. This course is designed for students who have not had a mathematics course for several years or who have never had an algebra course. This course is the first in a series of two courses that will prepare the student for the general education requirement in mathematics. This course may not be taken for credit after successfully completing a higher level math course. Note: credit from courses below the 100-level does not count toward the minimum 120 hours required for graduation.
This course covers topics needed to successfully complete the College Mathematics course. Topics include: polynomials and exponents, factoring and solutions of quadratic equations, rational expressions and equations and linear equations. This course will prepare students for the general education requirement in mathematics. This course may not be taken for credit after successfully completing a higher level math course. Note: credit from courses below the 100-level does not count toward the minimum 120 hours required for graduation.
Prerequisites
Prerequisite for Fayette campus only: Pass MATH 090 or ACT math score = 15 or an alternative placement mechanism as approved by the math department or instructor approval.
This course discusses a variety of mathematical techniques to improve the ability to critically reason and solve quantitative problems in realistic contexts. Topics include; logical analysis, sets, unit analysis, money management.
This course is a survey of mathematical applications of functions. Topics that will be covered include: fundamental concepts of algebra, algebraic equations and inequalities; functions and graphs; zeros of polynomial functions; exponential and logarithmic functions; systems of equations and inequalities. The mathematics of personal finance will also be studied.
Prerequisites
Pass MATH 095 or ACT math score = 19 or an alternative placement mechanism as approved by the math department or instructor approval.
This course is a study of functions, with specific focus on polynomial, rational, radical, exponential, logarithmic, and piecewise-defined functions. Representing functions, graphing functions, combining functions, and modeling with functions will be discussed.
Prerequisites
Pass MATH 095 or ACT math score > or equal to 21 or an alternative placement mechanism as approved by the math department or instructor approval.
This course examines quantitative methods for treating problems arising in biological, management, and social sciences. Topics include a brief review of sets, algebra, graphs, and functions systems of linear equations and matrices; linear programming; probability, derivatives and integrals.
Prerequisites
MATH 105, Or approved course in Finite Mathematics or College Algebra
This course is a study of trigonometry and analytic geometry. Topics include trigonometry, polar coordinates, vectors, conic sections, and parametric equations.
Prerequisites
Pass MATH 107 or ACT math score > or equal to 26 or an alternative placement mechanism as approved by the math department or instructor approval
This is the first of four courses combining plane and solid analytic geometry and calculus. This course focuses on differentiation of all elementary and trigonometric functions, including parametric and polar functions.
Prerequisites
MATH 115, Or permission of the instructor
This is a course in the calculus sequence. This course covers single variable integration techniques, and the application of single variable differential and integral calculus to curves in 2D and 3D.
Prerequisites
MATH 120
Students will learn how to find the optimal solution to problems involving realistic systems like those found in organizations or computer networks. Students will learn to find the optimal solution of a problem via appropriate use of either rational decision making or mathematical modeling and optimization. Topics include introductions to reasoning and logic, cost benefit analysis, mathematical modeling, graph theory, algorithms, linear programming, network analysis, queuing theory, and simulation modeling.
Prerequisites
MATH 115 (at least a "C-") and MATH 220 (at least a "C-") and CS 205 (at least a "C-") or instructor approval.
This is a course in the calculus sequence. It covers sequences and series as well as going in depth into limits and analysis including basic proofs of calculus concepts.
Prerequisites
MATH 200
This is a course in the calculus sequence. This course covers multiple variable function and vector field differential and integral calculus.
Prerequisites
MATH 200
An introduction to the simpler problems of statistical inference, descriptive statistics, probability distributions, estimation of parameters and level of significance, regression and correlation. This course may not be completed for additional credit by students who have completed MATH 226.
Prerequisites
Pass (MATH 105 or above) or ((pass MATH 095 or ACT math score ≥ 19) and pass MATH 100) or ACT math score ≥ 24 or an alternative placement as approved by the math department or instructor approval
The content of special topics courses will vary each time a special topic is offered.
An introduction to ordinary differential equations with elementary applications.
Prerequisites
MATH 215, Or instructor approval
This course develops the algebra and geometry of finite-dimensional linear vector spaces and their linear transformations. Also studied are the algebra of matrices and the theory of eigenvalues and eigenvectors.
Prerequisites
MATH 210
This course examines simple probability models, random variables, discrete and continuous distributions, sampling, elementary hypothesis testing and the power of a test, as well as application of probability to statistical methods.
Prerequisites
MATH 215, Or instructor approval
This course is the second part of a sequence course. It introduces students to various statistical inference topics: point estimation, interval estimation, and nonparametric tests. In addition, it also examines decision theory, regression analysis, correlation, design and analysis of experiments and time series/forecasting.
Prerequisites
MATH 301, MATH 302
This course is an introduction to combinatorics, graph theory, and number theory and their applications.
Prerequisites
MATH 310
This course provides a concentrated study of logic, sets, and proofs. Students will also learn more about mathematics as a field of study and the history of mathematics.
Prerequisites
MATH 200
A study of non-Euclidean geometry and Euclidean geometry motivated by Euclid’s Parallel Postulate. The course features a historical as well as mathematically rigorous approach to geometry. Topics include Euclid’s Parallel Postulate, Hilbert’s Axioms, Neutral Geometry, Non-Euclidean Geometry and Hyperbolic Geometry.
Prerequisites
MATH 200
An introduction to the rigorous treatment of completeness of the real numbers, convergence of sequences, limits and continuity of functions, and differentiation and integration.
Prerequisites
MATH 210, Or permission of instructor
This is a computer-oriented course, introducing students to numerical methods of solutions to mathematical problems and the programming of these methods. Some knowledge of programming is required, along with calculus and elementary matrix theory.
Prerequisites
MATH 215, Or instructor approval
This course aims at helping students prepare for the Society of Actuaries P Exam on probability. The application of problems encountered in actuarial science is emphasized. To this end, students will spend their time working on past problems from actual P Exams. Students will be expected to bring their questions to class, and class time will be spent working through them. In order to succeed, students need to be able to analyze a problem and quickly choose an approach to its solution.
This course develops the student’s understanding of the fundamental concepts of financial mathematics and how those concepts are applied in calculating present and accumulated values for various streams of cash flows as a basis for future use in reserving, valuation, pricing, asset/liability management, investment income, capital budgeting, and valuing contingent cash flows.
This course is the second part of a sequence course. It develops the student’s understanding of the fundamental concepts of financial mathematics and how those concepts are applied in calculating present and accumulated values for various streams of cash flows as a basis for future use in reserving, valuation, pricing, asset/liability management, investment income, capital budgeting, and valuing contingent cash flows. In addition, we also will work on some of the past Financial Mathematics Actuarial Science Exam (FM) problems to help students to prepare for the FM exam.
Prerequisites
MATH 215, MATH 391, FIN 310
An introduction to the study of algebraic systems, including groups, rings and fields, homomorphisms and isomorphisms.
Prerequisites
MATH 210, And consent of the instructor
The content of special topics courses will vary each time a special topic is offered.
Students conduct an in-depth study of a mathematical topic of interest to them which has been approved by the mathematics faculty. An oral and written presentation will be made of their findings. This is a capstone course and is required of all mathematics majors.
Prerequisites
Senior status

MBA Foundational

This course provides an introduction to financial concepts and principles. The course provides learners with an overview of the acquisition, analysis, and reporting of accounting information from the perspective of effective management decision-making in a global business environment. Attention is also given to the role of the financial system in the economy, investment analysis, and the financial decisions of business firms as related to capital budgeting, capital structure, and responsibility in the conduct of business financial operations. This course will not satisfy a Graduate Elective in any emphasis area of any graduate program.
Prerequisites
Graduate standing
Communication skills have consistently been ranked in the top five characteristics of successful managers for many years. Being able to communicate effectively is also a key component for success in academic situations as well. Through-out this course students will examine various communication strategies used in the 21st Century marketplace; additionally students will learn how to utilize these strategies to communicate information effectively using a variety of communication styles/tools. The course will provide students with the feedback, tools and coaching for both their academic and professional careers.

Music

A study of the elements that comprise all music and a survey of the world’s greatest composers and their music, from the age of Bach and Handel to the present. Meets the humanities requirement.
Must be taken in combination with the following session to receive one semester hour. May be repeated each semester for credit.
Must be taken in combination with the following session to receive one semester hour. May be repeated each semester for credit.
A study of jazz styles from the beginning of jazz to the present. Emphasis is on the differences as well as the similarities between the various styles. Topics covered include the music and the perform ers, composers and other personalities in the world of this uniquely American art form. Meets the humanities requirement.
An overview of popular music throughout the history of this country, with emphasis on Stephen Foster, Tin Pan Alley, jazz, rock and other recent styles; also the composers, lyricists, performers and other persons whose work and creativity have contributed to the vast body of popular music. Meets the humanities requirement.
Must be taken in combination with the following session to receive one semester hour. May be repeated each semester for credit.
Must be taken in combination with the following session to receive one semester hour. May be repeated each semester for credit.
Must be taken in combination with the following session to receive one semester hour. May be repeated each semester for credit.
Must be taken in combination with the following session to receive one semester hour. May be repeated each semester for credit.
Must be taken in combination with the following session to receive one semester hour. May be repeated each semester for credit.
Must be taken in combination with the following session to receive one semester hour. May be repeated each semester for credit.

Nursing

This course is designed to develop medical terminology language skills. Learners will demonstrate knowledge of word construction, definitions and use of terms related to all areas of health science. The course includes a basic understanding of anatomy of the human body, functions of health and disease, and the use of language in health careers. The use of medical dictionaries, Internet sites, and other modern technologies will be introduced.
Students are introduced to the processes of inductive and deductive reasoning while gaining the skills to interpret and/or evaluate arguments, perspectives and/or beliefs. These skills are applied while dissecting the components of an argument. Students practice the art of reflection using what is learned to develop strategies, materials, and interventions to be applied in the professional setting.
Prerequisites
ENG 102
This course focuses on concepts related to professional communication in the delivery of health care, both individual and collaborative. Students will explore verbal, written, and electronic communications as applied to the nursing profession and interprofessional items, including legal and ethical considerations. The impact and integration of information technology in health care will be explored. Heath literacy and effective teaching/learning strategies across the life span will be included.
Prerequisites
Admission to the nursing program
The course focuses on the identification, exploration, and analysis of concepts that influence professional nursing practice. Historical, social, political, professional, legal, and ethical factors will be examined. Traditional and emerging roles of the nurse will be analyzed to identify the present and future state of professional practice in the rapidly expanding field of nursing.
Prerequisites
Admission to the nursing program
Concepts related to health assessment, understanding of pathophysiology and effective nursing management of health care are presented. The interrelationships among concepts are explored as well as strategies to promote optimal restoration of health while providing safe, client centered, and quality driven health care. This is the first of a two-course sequence that must be completed to fully meet the competencies related to all body systems.
Prerequisites
Admission to the nursing program
This course examines a diverse group of health care beliefs and practices used instead of, or in concert with, western health care beliefs and practices. Students are expected to critically examine the belief systems, practices, and health outcomes for complementary, alternative, and western paradigms of health.
Concepts related to health assessment, understanding of pathophysiology and effective nursing management of health care are presented. The interrelationships among concepts are explored as well as strategies to promote optimal restoration of health while providing safe, client centered, and quality driven health care. This is the second of a two-course sequence that must be completed to fully meet the competencies related to all body systems.
Prerequisites
NUR 325, Admission to the nursing program
This course focuses on care of the community as client. Emphasis is on the role of the nurse in addressing the preventative health needs of populations at risk and other community groups at risk and other community groups in various community practice settings. Current public health problems, trends in health care delivery and community resources are examined. Students analyze the sociocultural, political, economic, ethical and environmental factors that influence community and global health. Students will implement a clinical project to meet the needs of an identified population.
Prerequisites
NUR 335
This course prepares students to develop culturally sensitive perspectives on healing modalities of different cultures and their application to current nursing practice. An international or local practicum experience with the intent to create a deeper understanding and appreciation of the art and science of being a healer will be incorporated in the course. Jean Watson’s 10 Carative Processes and Madeline Leininger’s Transcultural Nursing form the theoretical framework guiding the exploration and integration of transcultural healing traditions.
Prerequisites
Admission to the nursing program or permission of the nursing chair
This course introduces the student to the research process and focuses on the translation of current evidence into practice. Emphasis is on critical analysis of published research studies to facilitate implementation of evidence-based decisions in nursing practice.
Prerequisites
MATH 220, Or equivalent of MATH 220, And admission to the Nursing Program
In this course the student examines theory and concepts needed for successful leadership and management roles in the rapidly changing health care environment. Concepts of quality and safety are explored along with teamwork and effective communication for nurse leaders.
Prerequisites
NUR 400, And admission to the Nursing Program
Focus is on the history of nursing, nursing education, and health care from primitive times to current day. Course content includes study of historical periods and figures such as Florence Nightingale, Lavinia Doci, and Lillian Wald. Emphasis is on the relationship between nursing and society and the impact on modern nursing.
Prerequisites
Admission to the university
In this course students will explore the meaning of self-care, and its application to professional nursing. Multiple modalities will be introduced to expand the knowledge, understanding, and need for self-care. Students will also develop a personal self-care plan, implement the plan into their personal and professional lives, and evaluate the outcome.
Prerequisites
Admission to the nursing program
This course introduces the student to global health concepts and the network of organizations working to advance health care internationally. Emphasis will be placed on the global burden of disease and determinates of health students will be introduced to programs, systems, and policies affecting global health.
Prerequisites
Admission to the nursing program
This course will introduce students to nursing theorists and the foundations of their theories. Emphasis will be made on the types of theories and how these theories affect nursing practice and patient centered care. Students will begin to understand the essentials of nursing theory and the theorists behind their development.
Prerequisites
Admission to the nursing program
This image of the nurse in American culture has been varied, complex, and provocative. This course will introduce students to textual images of nurses in fiction, film, television, and visual arts within the contexts of American and nursing history.
Prerequisites
Admission to the nursing program
The primary function of this course is to serve as a structured service learning opportunity that fosters academic growth, citizenship, leadership, and civic responsibility. All requirements will be related to conducting specific services related to nursing and the community. May only be taken once.
Prerequisites
Admission to the nursing program
This course focuses on the healthcare policy process and the impact on nursing practice, healthcare delivery, and healthcare quality. Social, political, economical, historical, legal, ethical, and professional influences will be explored.
Prerequisites
Admission to the nursing program
This course will explore basic principles of fiscal resource management within healthcare organizations. Emphasis will be placed on the role of nurse leaders and managers in a variety of settings. Influencing factors such as healthcare reform, quality initiatives and reimbursement policies on patient care delivery and budgetary decisions will be explored. Basic fiscal resource management principles will be applied through interactive case studies.
Prerequisites
Admission to the nursing program
In this course students apply the concepts and skills acquired in the RN-BSN program to demonstrate growth as a competent, caring, professional nurse. Students research and design a capstone project intended to demonstrate scholarly inquiry, nursing excellence, leadership, and communication skills that integrate the general education learning outcomes with the learning outcomes in the major. Demonstration of baccalaureate level achievement is required.
Prerequisites
Senior status, 27 credits of the BSN curriculum, and 15 or fewer credits remaining to be completed through Upper Iowa University
In this course students apply the concepts and skills acquired in the RN-BSN program to demonstrate growth as a competent, caring, professional nurse. Students implement and evaluate a capstone project intended to demonstrate scholarly inquiry, nursing excellence, leadership, and communication skills that integrate the general education learning outcomes with the learning outcomes in the major. Demonstration of baccalaureate level achievement is required. This course includes the portfolio which serves as the summative evaluation and direct evidence of student achievement of individual program outcomes.
Prerequisites
NUR 450

Philosophy

A survey of the significant theories and theorists that have shaped the way human beings perceive their relationship to, and place in, the universe large. This course examines the classic questions of human existence: who are we, where did we come from and what is our destiny. Competing philosophical viewpoints will be represented. Ultimately, students will be encouraged to develop or explain critically their own positions regarding these fundamental problems. Meets the humanities requirement.
This course covers some of the main threats to doctrines and ideas of moral philosophy, including nihilism, relativism, egoism, utilitarianism, the categorical imperative, virtue, and the social contract. Rather than keeping these as pure theoretical constructs, these ideas will be applied to real life, practical situations, such as those involving ethics in the workplace, and important current debates. Meets the humanities requirement.
Special Topic courses are studies of selected problems, periods or movements in the subject area not otherwise included in the curriculum. They are typically chosen from a faculty member’s particular expertise and field of scholarly inquiry, and offered to a student or group of students forming an interest in the particular subject matter. The 250 designation denotes a General Education level of instruction and may include an appropriate General Education task to be completed. The 450 designation denotes a senior level degree of sophistication expected in both learning and instruction. A single course may be offered at both levels simultaneously, in which case the syllabus will clearly differentiate the course expectations and assessment measures for students enrolled at each of the two levels. A Special Topics course must be approved by the School of Arts and Sciences Curriculum Committee before it is offered, and it must address one or more Major Outcomes within the discipline.

Physics

This course introduces a broad range of topics in physics covering mechanics, thermodynamics, electricity, waves, light, nuclear, and modern physics. This course can be used to satisfy the general education requirement for physical science. This course does not meet the requirements for pre-medical, some pre-professional programs or most science majors. This course cannot be used as an elective for the general science major.
This course will expose students to laboratory exercises that will enhance their understanding of the fundamental principles learned in PHY 110.
Prerequisites
Co-requisite: PHY 110
This course provides a fundamental understanding of the universe. Scientific principles will be discussed and used to explain observations about the universe and the celestial objects that exist within it. Major topics include gravity, light, and telescopes; as well as the formation and evolution of planetary systems, stars, galaxies, and the universe itself.
The first of two courses in introductory physics commonly taken by students majoring in biology, chemistry, health professions and other disciplines requiring introductory level physics. Topics include: kinematics, Newton’s Laws, gravity, energy, momentum, rotational motion, solids and fluids, waves, sounds, and thermodynamics.
Prerequisites
Prerequisite/Co-Requisite: MATH 115 Trigonometry and Analytic Geometry or instructor approval
In this course, the laboratory experiments are used to help reinforce and physically demonstrate the concepts taught in PHY 111.
The second of two courses in introductory physics commonly taken by students majoring in biology, chemistry, health professions and other disciplines requiring introductory level physics. Topics include: electrostatics, electricity, magnetism, light, physical and geometric optics, and nuclear physics. Knowledge of algebra, geometry and trigonometry is assumed.
Prerequisites
PHY 111, Or consent of the instructor
In this course, the laboratory experiments are used to help reinforce and physically demonstrate the concepts taught in PHY 113.
The content of special topics courses will vary each time a special topic is offered.

Political Science

A survey of the basic constitutional principles, political institutions and public policies of American national government. Meets the social science requirement.
A study of the changing international order and the collapse of Soviet communism; international conflict and cooperation; international organizations and a revitalized UN; the Third World and international diplomacy. Meets the social science requirement.
This course compares and contrasts various aspects of the political process in pluralistic democracies, modern authoritarian systems, and developing nations. Students are introduced to political institutions in different states and will learn how to compare them in order to develop a better understanding of events in the modern world.
This course contends that political symbolic action extends to popular culture. Individuals are exposed to the precepts of specific cultures through popular culture, which express current and prevailing ideas, values and social relations in political society. In an era when human beings in advanced industrial societies increasingly devote time to the consumption of popular culture, it becomes increasingly important to recognize that popular culture supports or challenges existing political organization.
A survey of the basic principles, organizations and functions of government on the state, county, municipal, township and district levels. Meets the social science requirement.
Special Topics courses are studies of selected problems, periods or movements in the subject area not otherwise included in the curriculum. They are typically chosen from a faculty member’s particular expertise and field of scholarly inquiry, and offered to a student or group of students forming an interest in the particular subject matter. The 250 designation denotes a General Education level of instruction and may include an appropriate General Education task to be completed. The 450 designation denotes a senior level degree of sophistication expected in both learning and instruction. A single course may be offered at both levels simultaneously, in which case the syllabus will clearly differentiate the course expectations and assessment measures for students enrolled at each of the two levels. A Special Topics course must be approved by the School of Liberal Arts Curriculum Committee before it is offered, and it must address one or more Major Outcomes within the discipline.
A compilation of student work produced for completion of the Pre-Law Minor, along with evaluation of that work. Required for successful completion of the Pre-Law Minor.
Prerequisites
18 semester hours completed toward the Pre-Law Minor or approval of Pre-Law advisor
A survey of U.S. foreign relations from colonial time to the present, with emphasis on the constitutional, institutional and political factors shaping the formation and execution of American diplomacy. Same as HIST 342.
Prerequisites
PS 100
A general introduction to American representative assemblies, with primary attention given to the U.S. Congress. Emphasis is on the interplay of relationships with legislative bodies affecting the shaping of legislation.
This course is intended to provide an in-depth survey of American political parties and interest groups. This course is designed to examine not only theories concerning political parties and interest groups but also the practical operation and reality of political parties and interest groups in American politics.
Prerequisites
PS 100, Or permission of instructor
A study of the interaction in the policy-making roles of the President and Congress of the United States. Emphasis is on federal legislation, crisis politics and the system of checks and balances.
This course examines the role of the judiciary and the U.S. Supreme Court in the American political system. A case approach is taken to the development of U.S. constitutional law. Topics include the powers of the President and Congress, Federalism, the commerce clause, the taxing and spending power, and the contract clause.
Topics covered include civil liberties, equal opportunity and equal protection under the law for minorities, freedom of speech and religion and the right to privacy, and the rights of those accused of crimes.
Special Topics courses are studies of selected problems, periods or movements in the subject area not otherwise included in the curriculum. They are typically chosen from a faculty member’s particular expertise and field of scholarly inquiry, and offered to a student or group of students forming an interest in the particular subject matter. The 250 designation denotes a General Education level of instruction and may include an appropriate General Education task to be completed. The 450 designation denotes a senior level degree of sophistication expected in both learning and instruction. A single course may be offered at both levels simultaneously, in which case the syllabus will clearly differentiate the course expectations and assessment measures for students enrolled at each of the two levels. A Special Topics course must be approved by the School of Arts and Sciences Curriculum Committee before it is offered, and it must address one or more Major Outcomes within the discipline.

Psychology

An introduction to the scientific study of behavior and mental processes, including major approaches and methodologies. The course samples a broad range of topics, including biological foundations, development, learning, cognition, personality, abnormal psychology and social behavior. Meets the social science requirement.
A course designed to apply psychological approaches to normative events during life’s developmental stages, with a focus on environmental factors and the psychology of stress in a changing world. Meets the social science requirement.
This course focuses on how individuals grow and change from conception to adolescence. It addresses the biological factors that exist at birth, the psychosocial factors that affect changes and the resulting developmental stages. Meets the social science requirement.
Prerequisites
PSY 190
A survey of the professions, programs and agencies involved in the delivery of human services.
Prerequisites
PSY 190
This course takes the learner through the developmental stages of the human life cycle from the end of adolescence to the advanced stages of aging covering the physical changes, the social challenges and the psychological growth of an individual during those years. Meets the social science requirement.
Prerequisites
PSY 190
An analysis of group behavior in small and large groups of various types. The focus is on social interaction in the formation and operation of groups, and on the social system’s approach to understanding group behavior. Same as SOC 232. Meets the social science requirement.
An overview of conflict resolution and the mediation process as an alternative dispute resolution mechanism. Learning activities—conceptual and experiential in nature—are designed to promote an integration in the areas of problem solving behavior, skill development and personal awareness. Meets the social science requirement.
Special Topics courses are studies of selected problems, periods or movements in the subject area not otherwise included in the curriculum. They are typically chosen from a faculty member’s particular expertise and field of scholarly inquiry, and offered to a student or group of students forming an interest in the particular subject matter. The 250 designation denotes a General Education level of instruction and may include an appropriate General Education task to be completed. The 450 designation denotes a senior level degree of sophistication expected in both learning and instruction. A single course may be offered at both levels simultaneously, in which case the syllabus will clearly differentiate the course expectations and assessment measures for students enrolled at each of the two levels. A Special Topics course must be approved by the School of Arts and Sciences Curriculum Committee before it is offered, and it must address one or more Major Outcomes within the discipline.
An analysis of the changing cultural notions and social realities regarding male/female roles and relationships. Topics may include: cross-cultural research concerning gender differences; the role of various socializing agents in shaping sexual identities; and the effects of gender differences on political and economic processes. Same as SOC 260. Meets the social science requirement.
Prerequisites
SOC 110 or PSY 190
An introduction to the biological, psychological and social aspects of human sexuality. The course includes a study of sexuality in relation to the life cycle.
The effects of psychoactive drugs are studied in this course, as well as the origins of substance abuse, characteristics of substance abusers, and consequences for the individual, family and society. Approaches to substance abuse treatment are discussed.
Prerequisites
SOC 110 or PSY 190
This course presents the social aspects of human behavior, including personal perception, social cognition, attitude formation and change, attribution, prosocial behavior and interpersonal attraction. Same as SOC 310.
Prerequisites
SOC 110 or PSY 190
This course investigates issues, theories, and research findings that primarily concern women’s psychological and sexual lives. It explores topics such as gender roles, feminism, sexism, sexuality, personality variables, cognitive abilities, education, violence against women, and mental health.
Prerequisites
PSY 190
This course offers a multidisciplinary view of death and dying in individuals, families, and across cultures. This course will explore personal and societal attitudes, social practices and institutions that facilitate and constrain grief and mourning.
Prerequisites
ENG 101
An analysis of cognitive processes, including attention, perception, concept formation, language, memory, problem solving and decision making.
Prerequisites
PSY 190
An in-depth analysis of the theories, methods, and strategies for managing stress in our day-to-day functioning. Students will learn the conceptual and operational definitions of stress, be exposed to the psychophysiological and psychological responses to stress, and trained in specific evidence-based stress reduction strategies they will be able to use in working with their clients.
Prerequisites
PSY 190
A survey of the major theories of the nature and development of personality.
Prerequisites
PSY 190
This course explores the relation of biological function and human behavior; the role of genetic, hormonal and neurological factors in intelligence, sex differences, biological rhythms and emotional disorders. Disturbances produced by agents such as drugs and disease are studied. Does not satisfy the general education science requirement.
Prerequisites
PSY 190
A review of the major theories that attempt to explain motivated behavior from a physiological, cognitive, social, environmental and/or learning point of view. Application of motivation theories to organizations, education, sports and daily life.
Prerequisites
PSY 190
A study of the relationship between the individual worker and the work environment. Emphasis is on the exploration and application of the most influential theories. Topics include organizational dynamics, work motivation, job satisfaction, personnel selection and training, and work group influences.
Prerequisites
PSY 190
An overview of helping techniques, theory, and practice. Learning activities—conceptual and experiential in nature—are designed to promote growth in the areas of skill, development, and personal awareness.
Prerequisites
PSY 190
A survey of the major classifications of psychopathology, including conceptual approaches to the understanding of psychopathology, etiology and treatment.
Prerequisites
PSY 190
This course explores the development of skills essential to critical evaluation of behavioral research. The emphasis is on understanding scientific method, research, methodologies and statistical analysis.
Prerequisites
SOC 110 or PSY 190
This course explores the assumptions, strategies and techniques used in the delivery of human services, as well as problem identification and skill development. Same as SOC 375.
Prerequisites
SOC 110 or PSY 190
This course is designed to educate the prospective human services/social worker with the newly emerging client population in America and to recognize the impact of the interaction between clients and their environments, looking at cultural barriers, diverse at-risk populations and the systems that sustain at-risk clients. Same as SOC 377.
Prerequisites
PSY 375, Or permission of the instructor
An analysis of individual, group and cultural influences on human behavior. The emphasis is on contrasting levels of analysis and application to a variety of environmental settings. Note: Some background in both psychology and sociology is strongly recommended. Same as SOC 383.
Prerequisites
SOC 110 or PSY 190
This course prepares the prospective human services worker for entry into the profession by emphasizing theory, practice, and personal awareness. Specific techniques of interviewing and working with individuals will be covered through reading, lecture, and in-class practice
This course prepares the prospective human services worker to work with families and groups. It covers theories of family and group dynamics and examines the values and ethics of social work as they apply to work with families and small groups. Specific techniques will be covered through reading, lecture, discussion, and in-class practice.
This course prepares the prospective human services worker for entry-level work with communities and social institutions. It examines the values and ethics of social work as they apply to work with large groups. Specific information about organizations and working with them will be covered through reading, lecture, and in-class role play. Some field work in the community is required.
This course is designed to provide an analysis of the factors affecting adult development and aging. Emphasis is on the psychological, cognitive, sensory, physical, personality and interpersonal changes occurring with age.
Prerequisites
PSY 190
This course focuses on personal, interpersonal and societal factors in the human aging process. Emphasis is on family, community and governmental responsibility in defining and resolving problems of the aged in a modern industrial society.
Prerequisites
PSY 190
Focuses on the psychological and physiological human response to disasters. Using clinical research and case histories, this course studies normal and abnormal psychological reactions, the recovery process and principles of mental healthcare for victims of mass disasters. Differences between natural and man-made disasters are examined and factors that either worsen or mitigate the traumatizing after-effects are reviewed. Psychological aspects of Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD) disasters are also considered. Learners explore how individuals react to natural disasters and terrorist mass-casualty incidents.
Prerequisites
PSY 190
An introduction to the assumptions and techniques of psychological assessment.
Prerequisites
PSY 190, MATH 220
An introduction to the basic principles of learning and behavior in human and nonhuman animals with emphasis on applications of Pavlovian conditioning, instrumental conditioning, and basic memory processes.
Prerequisites
PSY 190
Special Topics courses are studies of selected problems, periods or movements in the subject area not otherwise included in the curriculum. They are typically chosen from a faculty member’s particular expertise and field of scholarly inquiry, and offered to a student or group of students forming an interest in the particular subject matter. The 250 designation denotes a General Education level of instruction and may include an appropriate General Education task to be completed. The 450 designation denotes a senior level degree of sophistication expected in both learning and instruction. A single course may be offered at both levels simultaneously, in which case the syllabus will clearly differentiate the course expectations and assessment measures for students enrolled at each of the two levels. A Special Topics course must be approved by the School of Arts and Sciences Curriculum Committee before it is offered, and it must address one or more Major Outcomes within the discipline.
An analysis of issues and ethical problems involved in the helping professions and programs.
Prerequisites
PSY 190
A capstone project intended to integrate the general education learning outcomes with the learning outcomes in the major demonstrating baccalaureate level achievement.
Prerequisites
ENG 102, And 30 or fewer credits remaining to be completed through UIU
A capstone project intended to integrate the general education learning outcomes with the learning outcomes in the major demonstrating baccalaureate level achievement.
Prerequisites
ENG 102, And 30 or fewer credits remaining to be completed through UIU
A capstone project intended to integrate the general education learning outcomes with the learning outcomes in the major demonstrating baccalaureate level achievement.
Prerequisites
ENG 102, And 30 or fewer credits remaining to be completed through UIU

Public Administration

Special Topics courses are studies of selected problems, periods or movements in the subject area not otherwise included in the curriculum. They are typically chosen from a faculty member’s particular expertise and field of scholarly inquiry, and offered to a student or group of students forming an interest in the particular subject matter. The 250 designation denotes a General Education level of instruction and may include an appropriate General Education task to be completed. The 450 designation denotes a senior level degree of sophistication expected in both learning and instruction. A single course may be offered at both levels simultaneously, in which case the syllabus will clearly differentiate the course expectations and assessment measures for students enrolled at each of the two levels. A Special Topics course must be approved by the School of Arts and Sciences Curriculum Committee before it is offered, and it must address one or more Major Outcomes within the discipline.
This course is designed to introduce students to grantsmanship principles and practices. Students will develop grant-seeking and grant-writing skills through practical learning opportunities. Students will learn to develop strong problem statements and designs for grants, seek out resources for funding, write a proposal, and develop budget and management strategies for the proposed project.
Prerequisites
ENG 102
This course introduces students to the field of emergency management. Learners will analyze various aspects of terrorism and emergency management and the responsibilities of public administrators for emergency management and preparedness in a variety of situations. Procedures and requirements for emergency management, including identification of hazards and response capabilities in both government and the private sector, will be examined.
Introduces concepts and basic descriptive information about the political system within the context of disaster policy and explores how political factors play a role in all phases of emergency management - regardless of the type or nature of the disaster event.
Prerequisites
PS 100, PS 230, PA 306
Explores the needs of public safety officials who have responsibility for emergency preparedness planning and response. Includes contexts for emergency planning—legal and jurisdictional; responsibility for planning and responding to emergencies; different types of emergencies, and an approach to planning that can be applied to emergency situations. Addresses specific issues associated with the planning process, including the role of the manager, the necessity for multi-agency involvement, various analytical techniques employed in planning, different levels of emergency planning, and different elements of the plan. Utilizes case analysis and discussion.
Prerequisites
PA 306, PA 320
Theoretical examination and practical application of post-disaster management activities including human behavior in emergency situations, warning, evacuation, sheltering, triage, damage assessment, disaster declaration, debris removal, media relations, crisis counseling, individual and public assistance, and other relevant functions. Decision making, incident command, EOC operations, coordination and service delivery strategies are also discussed.
Prerequisites
PA 332
A study of politics, administration and bureaucratic policy making at local, state and national levels, with emphasis on the relationship between governmental bureaucracies and the political system in the United States.
This course examines the history, growth and development of the modern urban area. Urban problems are identified, along with the management skills necessary to deal effectively with them. Urban politics and their impact on policy determination are also examined.
Through a case/scenario driven approach, learners deal with scenario-related threat events of increasing complexity, urgency, and intensity. Participants develop emergency policies, plans, and procedures to ensure an effective response. Preparedness and Response, Recovery and Mitigation, Public and Media Relations, and Political/Public Policy issues are integrated through the case/scenario.
Prerequisites
PA 306
Exploration of natural and man-made hazard mitigation and its role in disaster management; analysis of past and current government and private sector programs; examination of new approaches; structural versus non-structural actions; role of the natural environment in mitigating natural hazards; role of prevention/preparedness in reducing the impacts of future terrorism events.
Prerequisites
BA 210, PA 306
A concentrated study of the techniques of public administration, including the public budgeting process, law enforcement administration, recreation administration, and the administration of other public services.
Prerequisites
PA 364
Areas studied include budget planning, formulation, execution, and auditing; the sharing of taxing and spending power between the executive and legislative branches; the agency role of advocacy in budget preparation; budgets as a reflection of public policy.
Areas explored include bureaucracy and the regulatory process; judicial review of administrative action; the Administrative Procedures Act of 1946; delegation, standing, exhaustion, sovereign immunity, rulemaking, tort liability, evidence, discretion, investigation and enforcement.
A capstone project intended to integrate the general education learning outcomes with the learning outcomes in the major demonstrating baccalaureate level achievement.
Prerequisites
ENG 102, And 30 or fewer credits remaining to be completed through Upper Iowa University
A capstone project intended to integrate the general education learning outcomes with the learning outcomes in the major demonstrating baccalaureate level achievement.
Prerequisites
ENG 102, And 30 or fewer credits remaining to be completed through Upper Iowa University
This course provides students with the skills necessary to write a variety of documents commonly produced by public administrators in the field. There are two overriding focal points for the course: 1) Introducing students to writing as a democratic process that will likely involve controversial issues and many different internal and external stakeholders, and 2) Learning about the contemporary writing conventions of government and non-profit organizations. Critical thinking skills will also be emphasized throughout the course.
This course serves as a broad, graduate level introduction to the study and practice of public administration. Using the overriding values of diversity, democracy, and due process, students will examine key historical and contemporary developments in the field within the context of economic, legal, political, and socio-cultural environments. Select public administration subfields will also be explored.
A systematic approach to the planning and design of a program evaluation including the reporting of its results. This course provides students with an opportunity to employ the methodology and the qualitative tools used by evaluators to assess public programs. Students will also gain valuable experience by learning how to critically analyze evaluation research and use cost benefit analysis.
Prerequisites
PA 501, Or permission of the program chair
An application of the principles of program evaluation research design is the focus of this course. Students will have an opportunity to apply quantitative research methods to program evaluation process. The basics of good program evaluation reporting will also be covered.
Prerequisites
PA 502, Or permission of the program chair
This course introduces students to the method and history of political economy allowing students to compare and contrast political and market solutions to collective problems. This course also examines the underlying value judgments and ideological commitments that fuel the debates over public policy.
Students will develop an understanding of organizational behavior by understanding what goes on in the minds of managers and employees when they interact in organizations. Students will explore motivation as well as individual and group behavior in the communication process. Management for performance will be emphasized.
Analyzes and discusses the role of ethics for the practice of public administration. The development of ethical codes is traced from moral and constitutional roots. Explores the conflicts faced by program managers between ethical behavior and political/program expediency utilizing case studies and legal precedents. Focuses on the role of organizational, societal, and individual values in ethical public administration, consequences of ethical and unethical behaviors, and models for resolving ethical and values-based conflict in public organizations.
This course reviews the history of terrorism, especially since the French Revolution; its evolving definition, and how it relates to state violence; and its protean contemporary forms.
This course will include the investigation of leadership theories and explore the role of leadership in organizations. The course will also focus on the characteristics of leadership and the implications leadership has for organizations. Same as BA 509.
This course is designed to cover various financial management functions. Students will develop the analytical skills necessary to make managerial decisions based on information contained in the financial statements. The political, economic, and social context of financial decisions will be explored.
A study of the administration and management of the grants and funding contracts in public and nonprofit organizations including the basic principles, skills, methods, and techniques of grant writing. Students will explore the sources of grants, funding contracts, types of grants, and contracts available, and strategies to submit proposals for grants. Students will examine the reporting requirements for contracted programs and services and prepare related materials. In addition, using hypothetical programs, students will identify applicable requests for proposals and will develop a responsive grant proposal.
This course will review the definition and various forms of terrorism, as well as the strengths and weaknesses of terrorism and terrorist typologies. Various forms of political, religious, and cultural terrorism will be examined, as well as their causes. The course draws on theories and research from psychology, sociology and cultural studies to assist in reaching an understanding of terrorism from a psychological and cultural perspective.
This course will introduce the student to the dynamic environment faced by intergovernmental actors as they strive to protect the homeland from man-made and naturally occurring incidents. The evolution of emergency management and homeland security policy will be discussed. Students will discuss how policy choices affect the practice of emergency management and homeland security.
This course examines concepts and theoretical approaches to managing critical incidents. Case students will be used to examine the application of emergency management and homeland security strategies. This course builds on roles and responsibilities of all levels of government and the non-profit organizations in emergency management operations. Specifically, the Incident Command System, and the National Response Framework and the Stafford Act will be discussed.
This course will examine transnational nature of crime, terrorism and assess national security strategies employed by the U.S. and other nations. This course will allow students to evaluate global threats that may impact the U.S. security interests. The focus of this course is to allow students to analyze how U.S. and foreign governments counter criminal activities and terrorism. The emphasis will be on current global and regional threats to the U.S. national security.
This course will explore strategic efforts to improve emergency management mitigation and recovery efforts at the local, stte, and national level. The role of domestic and international organizations in helping prevent and recover from incidents will be explored. In addition, strategies to maintain uninterrupted government functions will be introduced.
An exploration of the analysis, development, implementation, and evaluation of policies and programs affecting health. Focuses on healthcare institutions, with some attention to managing health problems with non-medical interventions at the community level. Uses the case method applied to realistic situations in which specific decisions must be made by health managers or officials.
The course is designed to familiarize students with the financing, operation, regulation, and structure of the American health care system. Attention will be paid to environmental forces that shape and define the healthcare system.
This course is designed to examine human resources management in public organizations. Topics examined in the course are from a public manager perspective and emphasize the importance of the human dimension in contributing to organizational effectiveness and productivity. The course explores due process, diligence, diversity and equal opportunity in regards to the classification, recruitment, appointment, development, compensation and overall satisfaction of public employees. Democratic principles and various associated paradoxes within the context of public service to include employee rights are investigated.
Students explore the effect of macro- and micro-economic theory on the design, implementation, and outcomes of health and human services programs. Students explore optimization, consumer/client demand, production/service delivery, investment decisions, market structure, and information problems as applied to the public and not-for-profit health and human services sectors.
This course will include an analysis of counter-terrorist global policies, strategies, operations, and organizations since September 11. Students will become familiar with radical extremist organizations to evaluate current U.S. counterterrorism strategy to defeat these groups. A comparison will be made of U.S. counterterrorism strategy to other western nations‘ strategy to defeat terrorism. Given a scenario, students will critically analyze a terrorist organization’s motives, methods, and tactics to develop a counterterrorism strategy.
Prerequisites
PA 508
Explores the legal and regulatory issues faced by executives responsible for delivering healthcare and social services in the not-for-profit and government sectors. The course uses readings and case analyses to develop an understanding of the range of actions available to healthcare and social service executives and the effect limitations on actions can have on the quality, efficiency, and effectiveness of the services provided. The issues of privacy concerns, conflicts of interest, and fiduciary responsibility are explored.
This course examines the quality assessment of both business practices and health care delivery focusing on outcome measurements, process/outcome relationships, and methods for process improvement. Quality management tools and techniques are reviewed with a focus on patient safety, clinical quality, care outcomes, and cost benefit analysis in patient care.
Explores the processes and methods of financial management in the healthcare industry. Patterns of healthcare expenditures, methods of financing healthcare, financial planning and development, third party reimbursement, and internal controls in health institutions and programs management.
This course addresses the importance of information systems and information technology in improving decision-making in healthcare organizations and provides an overview of the integration of technology in the health care setting. Students will examine the processes used in the selection, application, and evaluation of computer software and hardware. Methods and processes to make informed business decisions related to the application and use of technology in health care will be discussed. Students will learn how integrated computer-based information systems can lead to decisions that improve and better coordinate care, allow for better management of medical records and orders, increase the timeliness of care, improve cost controls, enhance supply inventory and management, and become familiar with administrative data sets and information technology used in decision support.
Students examine the ideal of philanthropy and sources of revenue for nonprofit organizations. It allows for students to expand their understanding of the theories, best practices, and skills required to generate private funds for nonprofit organizations.
Examines the theory and practice of strategic and operational planning for hazards and disasters. Reviews the principles associated with evaluation of threats, risk and vulnerabilities as related to the formulation of prevention programs and plans. The principles of risk identification and communication, management and coordination of resources, and public education will be examined. The organizational aspects of emergency management and its position within local, state, and national governments will be discussed from the federal, state, local and tribal perspectives.
Explores and analyzes current topics on productivity in public organizations, with particular attention to change management, transparency, performance, accountability, work management processes, private sector management practice, outcome measurement, E-Government strategy, and labor-management relations. Contemporary productivity theories of a more generalized nature also will be explored. Integrates conceptual works in productivity with case studies that describe actual operations of public productivity programs. Cases cover concepts of measurement, management practice, technology and capital investment, and labor-management relations, with an emphasis on understanding the linkages between theory and practice.
Labor relations in public organizations including collective bargaining and employment law will be examined. Theories of conflict and methods of alternative dispute resolution will be introduced.
Introduction to the theories of advocacy in democratic processes including the ethical, legal, and regulatory issues surrounding its practice. It also examines communication and marketing theories nonprofit organizations use to effectively connect with vital stakeholders and constituencies and to promote activities, programs, positions, and services.
A critical examination of how nonprofit organizations must compete for volunteers in an increasingly competitive market. This includes analyzing the potential conflict between nonprofit values, mission, and the requirements to manage resources efficiently and effectively.
Examines how managers in public and nonprofit agencies can secure and utilize legal authority, human resources, and funds to accomplish organizational goals. Employs case studies to explore current problems and emerging issues of public administration.
Students will explore the issues, complexities and challenges associated with developing vulnerability analyses and the subsequent allocation of resources once the vulnerability analysis has been done. The emphasis of the course is on how to use technologies such as SCADA to create a model-based vulnerability analysis in order to protect critical sectors. How to integrate vulnerability analysis into emergency management and homeland security policy and decision making will be explored.
Seminar examining the evolution and practice of federalism and intergovernmental relations among American national, state, metropolitan, local, and tribal governments. Students will utilize different theoretical perspectives to analyze and critically evaluate the rationale for assigning and justifying which unit of government is best situated to develop, implement, monitor, and evaluate public policy.
An introductory exploration of the regulatory process including rulemaking, enforcement, and adjudication. Students will examine the history and evolution of administrative law, its role in defining the power and discretion of unelected officials, and the impact it has on the democratic process.
An introduction to how the American political system defines, constrains, and shapes public management at the state and local level. Of particular interest will be the role and responsibilities of public managers in promoting and upholding the public trust.
This course will introduce students to the tools and techniques used by policy analysts. Students will gain an appreciation for the political and logistical issues surrounding policy implementation. They will then explore the difficulties in evaluating program efficiency and effectiveness.
This is a seminar examining the theories, analytical tools, and political context of economic development at the state and local level. Students will examine current trends, issues, and controversies involving government-sponsored economic development.
The theory and practice of strategic management in public and non-profit organizations will be examined. It will include a discussion of the roles and responsibilities of actors involved in strategic management including the ethical dimension of strategic planning. Students will also be introduced to the fundamentals of board governance and trusteeship.
This course is designed to allow students an opportunity to explore the foundation of government and non-profit accounting theory from a management perspective. Students will analyze and apply Generally Accepted Accounting Principles established for governmental and non-profit organizations and will become familiar with building basic fund-based financial statements. This course will also examine the budgeting policies and practices of not-for-profit and governmental organizations. Budgeting techniques will be addressed as will theories of fiscal policy.
The seminar serves to integrate the learner’s studies in public administration by conducting a compliance audit type program evaluation beginning with the development of appropriate standards for each of the five program competencies and the competency established for the student’s emphasis area. The evaluation will demonstrate (1) integration of the MPA program objectives and competencies, (2) graduate-level writing skills using APA format (3) graduate level critical thinking skills and (4) in-depth understanding and application of the objectives of the area of emphasis utilizing appropriate research techniques.
Prerequisites
Completion of all core and area of emphasis courses or permission of the program director
Supervised field experience in a public sector or not-for-profit agency. Consent of MPA Coordinator and written report are required. This course is graded on a pass/fail basis.
Prerequisites
Completion of courses in the emphasis area

Religion

An investigation of the phenomenon of religion with a special emphasis on systems of belief, codes of conduct, use of ritual and notions of the sacred. Several religious traditions (e.g., Hinduism, Buddhism, Taoism, Judaism, Christianity, Islam) will be examined and compared with reference to these issues. Meets the humanities requirement.
This course is an introductory study of the Old Testament. The topics to be explored include the roots, meaning and place in history of this important book.
An introductory study of the New Testament. The topics to be explored include the roots, meaning and place in history of this important book.
This course is intended to serve as an introduction to the major religious and cultural traditions of South and East Asia. The main countries involved are India, China, and Japan with some additional consideration of Sri Lanka, Tibet, central Asia, Korea, Myanmar and Thailand. The course will proceed primarily by textual analysis with an emphasis on historical development within each religious tradition. Meets the humanities requirement.
Special Topics courses are studies of selected problems, periods or movements in the subject area not otherwise included in the curriculum. They are typically chosen from a faculty member’s particular expertise and field of scholarly inquiry, and offered to a student or group of students forming an interest in the particular subject matter. The 250 designation denotes a General Education level of instruction and may include an appropriate General Education task to be completed. The 450 designation denotes a senior level degree of sophistication expected in both learning and instruction. A single course may be offered at both levels simultaneously, in which case the syllabus will clearly differentiate the course expectations and assessment measures for students enrolled at each of the two levels. A Special Topics course must be approved by the School of Arts and Sciences Curriculum Committee before it is offered, and it must address one or more Major Outcomes within the discipline.

Sociology

A basic introduction to sociology as a scientific analysis of the social relations and practices of human beings. Specific attention is given to social psychology, various forms of social stratification and inequality, social institutions and social change. Meets the social science requirement.
A critical investigation of selected social problems: their causes, development and the alternative social policies that address these problems. Topics will include: substance abuse, the problems of family life, poverty and its relation to different forms of social inequality. Meets the social science requirement.
An analysis of group behavior in small and large groups of various types. The focus is on social interaction in the formation and operation of groups, and on the social system’s approach to understanding group behavior. Same as PSY 232. Meets the social science requirement.
This course provides sociological perspectives for recognizing the diversity within our society and for analyzing the development and current position of complex subcultures within the structure of modern America. Meets firstly the cultures requirement or secondly the social science requirement, but not both.
Special Topics courses are studies of selected problems, periods or movements in the subject area not otherwise included in the curriculum. They are typically chosen from a faculty member’s particular expertise and field of scholarly inquiry, and offered to a student or group of students forming an interest in the particular subject matter. The 250 designation denotes a General Education level of instruction and may include an appropriate General Education task to be completed. The 450 designation denotes a senior level degree of sophistication expected in both learning and instruction. A single course may be offered at both levels simultaneously, in which case the syllabus will clearly differentiate the course expectations and assessment measures for students enrolled at each of the two levels. A Special Topics course must be approved by the School of Arts and Sciences Curriculum Committee before it is offered, and it must address one or more Major Outcomes within the discipline.
An analysis of the changing cultural notions and social realities regarding male/female roles and relationships. Topics may include: cross-cultural research concerning gender differences; the role of various socializing agents in shaping sexual identities; and the effects of gender differences on political and economic processes. Same as PSY 260. Meets the social science requirement.
Prerequisites
SOC 110 or PSY 190
This course explores the impacts of globalization on social institutions, structures, and relationships. Particular emphasis is placed on global economies, organizations, and political arrangements and their roles in shaping world inequality, cultural change, and environmental impacts. Students will be required to demonstrate understanding of global societies and networks, and their position in the global society.
This course presents the social aspects of human behavior, including personal perception, social cognition, attitude formation and change, attribution, prosocial behavior and interpersonal attraction. Same as PSY 310.
Prerequisites
SOC 110 or PSY 190
This course is an introduction to use of the scientific method of observation in sociology. Quantitative and qualitative research approaches are defined. Data collection techniques including experiments, survey research, field research, and unobtrusive observation are addressed in detail. Population sampling strategies and data analysis techniques are covered.
Prerequisites
MATH 220
Basic theories of the causes and consequences of deviant behavior, the contribution of agents and agencies of social control in the labeling of deviant actors and their subsequent careers.
Prerequisites
SOC 110
This course represents a sociological approach to understanding the family as a social institution: courtship, marital and family practices, the family as an agent of socialization, and changes in the family in the 20th century.
Prerequisites
SOC 110
This course represents a sociological approach to understanding the family as a social institution: courtship, marital and family practices, the family as an agent of socialization, and changes in the family in the 20th century.
Prerequisites
SOC 110
This course explores the assumptions, strategies and techniques used in the delivery of human services, as well as problem identification and skill development. Same as PSY 375.
Prerequisites
SOC 110 or PSY 190
This course is designed to educate the prospective human services/social worker with the newly emerging client population in America and to recognize the impact of the interaction between clients and their environments, looking at cultural barriers, diverse at-risk populations and the systems that sustain at-risk clients. Same as PSY 377.
Prerequisites
PSY 375, Or permission of the instructor
This course addresses the manifestation and use of power in society. Three major theories of social power are addressed. The negotiation of power arrangements between groups and the institutionalization of power within state structures is addressed. Particular emphasis is placed on the role of social power in determining resource distributions, inequality, and the formation of laws.
An analysis of individual, group and cultural influences on human behavior. The emphasis is on contrasting levels of analysis and application to a variety of environmental settings. Note: Some background in both psychology and sociology is strongly recommended. Same as PSY 383.
Prerequisites
SOC 110 or PSY 190
An analysis of social policies in the United States, with emphasis on the dimensions of choice and alternative policies, along with assessment of contemporary social welfare issues, programs and legislation.
Prerequisites
SOC 110
Development of social theory from Auguste Compte to Anthony Giddens. A critical appreciation of the concepts, models and analytical schemes employed in contemporary theories.
Prerequisites
Junior status and nine credits of sociology
Applied Research Methods is the capstone experience for sociology majors. Students will demonstrate their understanding of sociological theory and methods of scientific, sociological inquiry. Students will be required to demonstrate understanding of the discipline of sociology through formation of a sociological research question, completing a review of current literature, and developing a research proposal.
Special Topics courses are studies of selected problems, periods or movements in the subject area not otherwise included in the curriculum. They are typically chosen from a faculty member’s particular expertise and field of scholarly inquiry, and offered to a student or group of students forming an interest in the particular subject matter. The 250 designation denotes a General Education level of instruction and may include an appropriate General Education task to be completed. The 450 designation denotes a senior level degree of sophistication expected in both learning and instruction. A single course may be offered at both levels simultaneously, in which case the syllabus will clearly differentiate the course expectations and assessment measures for students enrolled at each of the two levels. A Special Topics course must be approved by the School of Arts and Sciences Curriculum Committee before it is offered, and it must address one or more Major Outcomes within the discipline.
A compilation of student work produced for completion of the Sociology Minor, along with evaluation of that work. Required for successful completion of the Sociology Minor.
Prerequisites
Completion of (or current enrollment in) all courses required for the Sociology minor
A capstone project intended to integrate the general education learning outcomes with the learning outcomes in the major demonstrating baccalaureate level achievement.
Prerequisites
ENG 102, And 30 or fewer credits remaining to be completed through UIU

Software Engineering

This course is an introduction to the concepts of object-oriented programing and modern programing practices. The course covers object oriented programing paradigm with the definition and use of classes, object and methods along with the fundamentals of object-oriented design including encapsulation, inheritance,polymorphism, and events. Topics also include an overview of programing language principles, simple analysis of algorithms, basic searching and sorting techniques, and an introduction to software engineering issues.
Prerequisites
CS 140
Students will study the principles of game design and use this knowledge to program their own games. Students will also learn about a game’s components: the representation of the player, of artifacts, the virtual environment that contains them, and the interaction between them and the player.
Prerequisites
CS 140, Or consent of instructor
This course is an introduction to the fundamental concepts of data structures and the algorithms that proceed from them. Topics include recursion, the underlying philosophy of object-oriented programing, fundamental data structures (including stacks, queues, linked lists, hash tables, trees,and graphs), the basics of algorithmic analysis, and an introduction to the principles of language translation.
Prerequisites
SE 200
This course is an introduction to requirements,design, reviewing, implementation and testing of simple software solutions that interact with an operating system, a database, and network communication, and that involves graphical user interfaces. The course covers the effective use of simple data structures, frameworks, evolutionary patterns and AP is when implementing and maintaining designs. The course also covers the use of simple design patterns and the drawing simple UML class, package, and component diagrams.
Prerequisites
SE 300, CS 332
The course introduces students to information and systems theories, information technologies, analysis and design of information systems, information problem identification and practical problem solving, and supporting decision making. The course covers both conceptual building blocks and practical dimensions of informatics. Students will also be introduced to statistical analysis, programming for informatics, and knowledge engineering. Information processing applications to solve real world problems in broad domains will be emphasized.
Prerequisites
MATH 303, SE 300, Or consent of instructor
This course provides students with principles and a working knowledge of visualization, and Computer Graphics. The course includes the creation of graphics simulations for various applications such as games, scientific visualization, and virtual-reality based learning environments. Students will acquire working knowledge of the advanced techniques in graphics, and should be able to understand the role of visualization, and identify potential scientific problems. Students should be able to actively apply this knowledge to solve today’s scientific problems in the area of technology, game design, engineering, and science.
Prerequisites
MATH 301, SE 300, Or consent of instructor
This course presents the concepts, algorithms, techniques, and systems in Data warehousing, Data mining and Big Data. The course introduces students to data preprocessing, data warehouse and OLAP systems,frequent pattern and association analysis,classification and prediction,clustering analysis and analysis of large amounts of data and the algorithms that are commonly used to build predictive models and find relevant patterns in data.
Prerequisites
MATH 303, SE 300, Or consent of instructor
This course is an introduction of testing techniques and principles. The course covers the concepts of defects vs. failures, equivalence classes, boundary testing, black-box vs. structural testing and types of defects. The course also covers test instrumentation and tools, developing test plans, managing the testing process,problem reporting,tracking, analysis and testing strategies,including unit testing, integration testing, profiling,test driven development, state based testing, configuration testing, compatibility testing, and web site testing (Alpha, beta, and acceptance testing).
Prerequisites
SE 310
This course presents the concepts, techniques, and algorithms for creating effective visualizations based on principles from graphic design,visual art, perceptual psychology, and cognitive science The course will cover the practical application of visualization, as well as building better visualization tools and systems, the available visualization techniques, and their characteristics.The course will also cover the use of available visualization toolkits to enable the rapid development of visualizations.
Prerequisites
MATH 301, SE 300, Or consent of instructor

Spanish

Students learn and practice the following skills in Spanish on the basic level: understanding, speaking, reading, and writing. During this course students are also exposed to and become familiar with various aspects of the cultures of Spain and Latin American countries, such as dialectal variation, customs, and everyday life situations, as well as some historical events and geopolitical circumstances in Spanish speaking territories. Native speakers of Spanish may not take this course. SPN 101 is meant for true beginners. Students with questions about their language level are strongly advised to consult the instructor before signing up for the class. Meets the humanities general education requirement.
Continuation of learning Spanish on the introductory level, with emphasis on expanding grammatical structures, vocabulary, and communication skills. Native speakers of Spanish may not take this course. Students with questions about their language level are strongly advised to consult the instructor before signing up for the class. Meets the humanities general education requirement.
Prerequisites
SPN 101, Or consent of instructor
The Hispanic world has long been a world of cultural contact. This course is a sweeping introduction to the wide range of New-World Hispanic cultures covering a period of over a millennium. The course will incorporate a variety of subjects and approaches (anthropology, history, art, religion, political science, etc.) to look at the “lifeways” of a variety of countries and civilizations. Meets the cultures or the social science general education requirement, but not both.
The course is meant to reinforce a student's existing knowledge of Spanish and to expand it, fostering communication skills in the language through: comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. In all class activities, we pay close attention to grammatical accuracy, correct pronunciation/orthography and learning new vocabulary in order to achieve proficiency on the intermediate level. More in-depth cultural information about Spain and Latin American countries constitutes the background for class activities and allows the understanding of dialectal differences in Spanish and the realities of native Spanish speakers. Students with questions about their language level are strongly advised to consult the instructor before signing up for this class. Meets the humanities general education requirement.
Prerequisites
SPN 102, Or consent of instructor
Continuation of learning Spanish on the intermediate level, with emphasis on expanding grammatical structures, vocabulary, and communication skills. Native speakers of Spanish may not take this course. Students with questions about their language level are strongly advised to consult the instructor before signing up for the class. Meets the humanities general education requirement.
Prerequisites
SPN 201, Or consent of instructor
Special Topics courses are studies of selected problems, periods or movements in the subject area not otherwise included in the curriculum. They are typically chosen from a faculty member’s particular expertise and field of scholarly inquiry, and offered to a student or group of students forming an interest in the particular subject matter. The 250 designation denotes a General Education level of instruction and may include an appropriate General Education task to be completed. The 450 designation denotes a senior level degree of sophistication expected in both learning and instruction. A single course may be offered at both levels simultaneously, in which case the syllabus will clearly differentiate the course expectations and assessment measures for students enrolled at each of the two levels. A Special Topics course must be approved by the School of Arts and Sciences Curriculum Committee before it is offered, and it must address one or more Major Outcomes wthin the discipline.
The course is meant to deepen a student's knowledge of Spanish and to teach steps towards fluency. Students are expected to show grammatical accuracy, use correct pronunciation/orthography, display a rich vocabulary, and demonstrate cultural awareness about Spain and Latin American countries in all class activities. Students with questions about their language level are strongly advised to consult the instructor before signing up for a Spanish class. Meets the humanities general education requirement.
Prerequisites
SPN 202, Or consent of instructor
Continuation of learning Spanish on the advanced level. Students should demonstrate the ability to communicate in the language and work towards achieving proficiency in line with this level in all facets. Students with questions about their language level are strongly advised to consult the instructor before signing up for the class. Meets the humanities general education requirement.
Prerequisites
SPN 301, Or consent of instructor
This course provides a look at the world of Spain in all facets: culture, society, politics, and economy. It provides a general historical overview, with the greatest degree of material focusing on the past century, beginning with the Restoration and Spain’s loss of the final pieces of its empire with the Spanish American War (1898), and touching on important events and the cultural climate and forms of Spain, from literature to regime changes. Meets the cultures or the social science general education requirement, but not both.
Prerequisites
At least one prior social science or cultures course
Survey of contemporary Hispanic literature, preceded by a short review of the historical literary development through sampling brief fragments of a few pillar writers. Course activities consist of reading in Spanish and discussing selections from the short stories, essays, novels, dramas and poetry of various Spanish-language authors.
Prerequisites
SPN 202, Or consent of instructor
This course develops effective oral and written communication skills for a variety of professional situations, including: business, health care, education, and human services. Emphasis is placed on use of the language in specific professional environments, in line with student needs.
Prerequisites
SPN 302, Or consent of instructor
Special Topics courses are studies of selected problems, periods or movements in the subject area not otherwise included in the curriculum. They are typically chosen from a faculty member’s particular expertise and field of scholarly inquiry, and offered to a student or group of students forming an interest in the particular subject matter. The 250 designation denotes a General Education level of instruction and may include an appropriate General Education task to be completed. The 450 designation denotes a senior level degree of sophistication expected in both learning and instruction. A single course may be offered at both levels simultaneously, in which case the syllabus will clearly differentiate the course expectations and assessment measures for students enrolled at each of the two levels. A Special Topics course must be approved by the School of Arts and Sciences Curriculum Committee before it is offered, and it must address one or more Major Outcomes within the discipline.

Special Education

Special Topics courses cover special topics not covered by current courses taught in the department. The particular topic selected is to be determined by the department according to the current need and interest. This course required department chair approval.
This course is an introduction to students with disabilities. English language learners, students placed at risk, and students who are gifted are also addressed. Upon completion of this course, the pre-service educator should have basic knowledge of teaching strategies and instructional modifications and accommodations for inclusive education.
Prerequisites
None, but EDU 110 is highly recommended
This course covers special topics not covered by current courses taught in the department. The particular topic is to be determined by the department according to the current need and interest. This course requires department chair approval.
This course will develop the skills of listening, supporting, guiding and assisting behaviors to be utilized in developing strong relationships with parents and community members. Pre-service educators will examine the impact of cultural diversity, factors which place families at risk, advocacy and public policy. Pre-service educators will become familiar with community resources. Pre-service educators will also explore the effective use of parent-teacher conferences, home visits and interviews.
Prerequisites
EDU 110, And admittance to the Teacher Education Program
This course provides strategies for identifying, anticipating, preventing and managing individual and group behavior difficulties within a class setting. The course focuses on creating positive learning environments and structuring individual and group learning activities so that instruction is enhanced, social interactions are increased and problem behaviors are prevented.
This course provides knowledge of characteristics and application of definitions and methods for managing and teaching PreK-12 students with behavior disorders. The course will include strategies and curriculum for preventing behavior disruptions and provide opportunities for students to develop and justify the components of Individual Education Plans (IEPs). Pre-service educators and teachers will examine appropriate assistive technology service and devices. A minimum of 10 clock hours will be spent in observing and/or assisting in a special education setting.
Prerequisites
EDU 110, SPED 304, And admittance to the Teacher Education Program
This is a prekindergarten-12 introductory course for providing educational services to students with disabilities. This course will include characteristics of and current trends and issues for serving these students, basic theoretical and practical approaches, educational alternatives, implication of federal and state statutes and related services and the importance of the multidisciplinary team in providing appropriate educational programming. A minimum of 10 clock hours of field experience will be spent in observing and/or assisting with students with disabilities.
Prerequisites
EDU 110, SPED 304, And admittance to the Teacher Education Program
The course will provide students the opportunity to understand how to establish collaborative community relationships in order to develop cooperative occupational programs for students with exceptional needs. Students will become aware of existing services within the community and various supports to ensure smooth transitioning from education to postsecondary occupational settings. Students will examine the role of a work experience coordinator in effectively managing on-the-job training and making instructional decisions pertaining to on-the-job training. This class includes information on assessing students’ job skills, locating and placing students in work experience opportunities, working with students and the job site sponsors to insure that effective training is occurring, evaluating student performance, and other related activities.
Prerequisites
SPED 304, SPED 477, And admittance to the Teacher Education Program
The purpose of this course is to extend the knowledge of learning disabilities for those who seek to work with students with learning disabilities ages 5-21. Addressed in this course are characteristics of learning disabilities, definitions, history, assessment, medical aspects, teaching of preschoolers through adolescents, and research-based curriculum and teaching strategies for preacademic learning, oral language, reading, writing, mathematics, and social-emotional development. Pre-service educators and teachers will examine appropriate assistive technology services and devices. A 10-hour experience in the field is a requirement of this course.
Prerequisites
EDU 110, SPED 304, SPED 467, And admittance to the Teacher Education Program
The purpose of this course is to extend the knowledge of intellectual disabilities for those who seek to work with students with intellectual disabilities ages birth-21. This course emphasizes empirically-validated practices in the education of students with intellectual disabilities: assessment of instructional needs, instructional strategies, research-based curriculum, classroom management and behavioral support, promotion of social and communication skills, promotion of self-determination, and utilization of appropriate assistive technology services and devices. A 10-hour experience in the field is a requirement of this course.
Prerequisites
SPED 304, SPED 467, And admittance to the Teacher Education Program
This course provides knowledge of appropriate empirically-based curriculum and strategies useful for pre-service educators and teachers in developing methods, strategies and curriculum and adapting traditional materials for use with secondary students receiving special education services. A minimum of 10 clock hours will be spent in observing and/or assisting in a special education setting.
Prerequisites
EDU 110, SPED 304, SPED 467, And admittance to the Teacher Education Program
This course provides knowledge and application of career planning and transition for adolescents from school to adult living, including major laws, suggestions for planning and developing assessment and instructional procedures and coverage of some of the major issues facing schools, parents and students today. Included will be practice developing Individual Education Plans (IEPs) and transition services under the mandate of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). The pre-service educators and teachers will spend a minimum of 10 field experience hours observing and/or completing activities in a secondary special education setting.
Prerequisites
EDU 110, SPED 304, And admittance to the Teacher Education Program
This course requires application of content from SPED 467 to consider the learning support needs of students with mild and/or moderate disabilities in PreK-8 multicategorical and inclusive settings. It focuses on instructional design, methods, and curriculum for teaching and supporting the success of students with mild and/or moderate disabilities in the areas of reading, writing, math, and study/learning skills. Development of Individual Education Plans, use of assistive technology, support of English Learners, and social/emotional/behavioral supports are also addressed. A minimum of 10 clock hours will be used to observe and assist in a special education setting.
Prerequisites
SPED 467
The content of special topics courses will vary each time a special topic is offered.
This course will develop the skills of listening, supporting, guiding, and assisting behaviors utilized in developing strong relationships with parents and community members. Students will examine the impact of cultural diversity, factors which place families at-risk, advocacy, and public policy. Students will become familiar with community resources. Students will also explore the effective use of parent-teacher conferences, home visits, and interviews.
This course provides strategies for identifying, anticipating, preventing, and managing individual and group behavior difficulties within a class setting. The course focuses on creating positive learning environments, and structuring individual and group learning activities, so instruction is enhanced, social interactions are increased, and problem behaviors are prevented.
This course provides knowledge of characteristics and application of definitions and methods for managing and teaching PreK-12 students with behavior disorders. The course will include strategies and curriculum for preventing behavior disruptions and provide opportunities for students to develop and justify the components of Individual Education Plans (IEPs). Pre-service educators and teachers will examine appropriate assistive technology service and devices. A minimum of 10 clock hours will be spent in observing and/or assisting in a special education setting.
This course will address characteristics of and current trends and issues in serving students with disabilites. It offers basic theoretical and practical approaches, educational alternatives, implications of federal and state statutes and related services, and rationale for the multidisciplinary team in providing appropriate education programming. A minimum of 10 hours of field experience is required.
The course will provide students the opportunity to understand how to establish collaborative community relationships in order to develop cooperative occupational programs for students with exceptional needs. Students will become aware of existing services within the community and various supports to ensure smooth transitioning from education to postsecondary occupational settings. Students will examine the role of a work experience coordinator in effectively managing on-the-job training and making instructional decisions pertaining to on-the-job training. This class includes information on assessing students’ job skills, locating and placing students in work experience opportunities, working with students and the job site sponsors to insure that effective training is occurring, evaluating student performance and other related activities.
Prerequisites
SPED 577
The purpose of this course is to extend the knowledge of learning disabilities for those who seek to work with students with learning disabilities ages 5-21. Addressed in this course are characteristics of learning disabilities, definitions, history, assessment, medical aspects, teaching of preschoolers through adolescents, and research-based curriculum and teaching strategies for preacademic learning, oral language, reading, writing, mathematics, and social-emotional development. Pre-service educators and teachers will examine appropriate assistive technology services and devices. A 10-hour experience in the field is a requirement of this course.
Prerequisites
SPED 567
The purpose of this course is to extend the knowledge of intellectual disabilities for those who seek to work with students with intellectual disabilities ages birth-21. This course emphasizes empirically-validated practices in the education of students with intellectual disabilities: assessment of instructional needs, instructional strategies, research-based curriculum, classroom management and behavioral support, promotion of social and communication skills, promotion of self-determination, and utilization of appropriate assistive technology services and devices. A ten-hour experience in the field is a requirement of this course.
Prerequisites
SPED 567
This course provides knowledge of appropriate empirically-based curriculum and strategies useful for pre-service educators and teachers in developing methods, strategies and curriculum and adapting traditional materials for use with secondary students receiving special education services. A minimum of 10 clock hours will be spent in observing and/or assisting in a special education setting.
Prerequisites
SPED 567
This course provides knowledge and application of career planning and transition for adolescents from school to adult living, including major laws, suggestions for planning and developing assessment and instructional procedures, and coverage of some of the major issues facing schools, parents, and students today. Included will be practice developing Individual Education Plans (IEPs) and transition services under the mandate of Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). The student will spend a minimum of 10 field experience hours observing and/or completing classroom assignments in a secondary special education setting.
This course requires application of content from SPED 567 to consider the learning support needs of students with mild and/or moderate disabilities in PreK-8 multicategorical and inclusive settings. It focuses on instructional design, methods, and curriculum for teaching and supporting the success of students with mild and/or moderate disabilities in the areas of reading, writing, math, and study/learning skills. Development of Individual Education Plans, use of assistive technology, support of English Learners, and social/emotional/behavioral supports are also addressed. A minimum of 10 clock hours will be used to observe and assist in a special education setting.
Prerequisites
SPED 567

Sport Administration

Students will be given an overview of the components involved in sports programming and athletic administration. These include, but are not limited to: the history of sport and sports administration, legal issues, ethics, marketing, facilities, and leadership skills.
This course will cover topics including the NCAA and other athletic organizations, their member divisions and conferences, athletic department administration and the responsibilities of the athletic directors, coaches and their staff, and management of student-athletes from multiple perspectives.
Prerequisites
BA 210
The purpose of this course is to explore the basic concepts and principles of sports marketing as it relates to strategic planning, marketing analysis, legal considerations, and media concerns. This course will also focus on concepts as they relate to sports marketing such as licensing, sponsorship, advertising, public relations, and consumer behavior.
Prerequisites
MKT 208
This course will introduce legal concepts and how sports administrators will apply these concepts into their management of personnel, events, facilities, athletic programs, governance issues, and marketing as well as conducting basic legal research. Types of law discussed will include, but not be limited to, tort, contract, intellectual property, liability and negligence, and constitutional laws.
Prerequisites
BA 302
The purpose of this course is to familiarize students with the knowledge and foundational principles pertinent to the planning techniques concerning indoor and outdoor facility development used for college Athletics, sport, recreation and physical education.
Prerequisites
BA 210
This course will be an introduction to the principles and practices of the business and management of international sport. This emerging field deals with transnational and cross-cultural issues including but not limited to international politics, cultures, economics, law, marketing, ethics, monetary polices and foreign competition. It will create a greater awareness and appreciation for working in a multicultural, multinational setting.
Prerequisites
BA 210
This course will identify the structure and function of sport organizations along with the issues that sport managers will have to address. Where the power lies and how individual sport organizations fit into the greater sport industry play a critical role in how successful a sport manager will be in an ever more global sport industry.
Prerequisites
BA 210
This course provides an overview of the components involved in sports programming and athletic administration. Specifically the course will focus on planning, organzing, leading and controlling sport situations.
This course will investigate multiple aspects of sport ethics through a review of a wide range of literature in sport.
This course will examine the leadership and management skills necessary for a fully functioning athletic department at the junior/community college level (NJCAA), and at the Division I, II & III (NCAA) levels.
This course will explain and evaluate all aspects of sport communication and its impact on the management, marketing and operationsl goals of sport organizations.
This course will examine the impact that finances have on decision making in sport organizations. Short case studies will be utilized throughout he course to clarify a variety of procedures and policies.
A discussion of the theories, concepts and development of analytics in sports administration today. Students will evaluate and analyze the methods of sport analytics; player performance, player management, sports data strategies, team management, game day operations and strategies. They will also explore methods used in sports team marketing and communications, ticket pricing, loyalty and sponsorship program development, and customer relationship marketing. This is a case-study and project-based course involving extensive sports team business data analysis.
This course will outline how legal issues intertwine with sport leader duties and responsibilities, and how to best use that information to make sound operational decisions.
This course will provide a comprehensive overview of the leadership skills needed to work in the field of sport. Research information as well as practical examples will be utilized. Decision making, organizational change, emotional intelligence, vision, strategic planning and crisis management will be reviewed.
This course is designed to provide students with a conceptual blueprint for teaching sport and the fundamentals associated with sports coaching to include theory of coaching, principles of physical training, and principles of sports management.
This course is an examination of major psychological theories and research related to sport and exercise participation and performance. It will provide information on topics, such as motivational theories, cognitive theories, emotional theories, attribution theories, mental conditioning and the humanistic approach, team dynamics, performance enhancing strategies, and gender and cultural issues.
This course develops an understanding of, and analyzes highly effective performance training programs for any level of athlete. Areas of focus include basic physiology, periodization, nutrition, professional standards, high performance models and leadership.
This course will provide a comprehensive overview of contemporary sport technology from multiple perspectives. Innovation and improvement of sports performance will be the main emphasis areas.
This course is designed to examine in-depth current developments in specific areas of interest to the student within the coaching field. Content will be developed between the academic advisor and the student as requested on an individual basis.
This course will break down the research process as it relates to sport management. Research design, implementation, analysis and assessment will be discussed and a research project will be conducted.
This course will analyze and evaluate the management of sport facilities at all levels. Risk management and security issues, the history of the industry and financing will be discussed.
This course will address specific issues affiliated with international sport management such as structure of governance, policies and procedures, and cultural differences and expectations. Discussion will also occur regarding the interrelationship between all business aspects and international sports including but not limited to sport media, sport facilities, sport event management and sport tourism.
This course is an overview of major issues in sport including but not limited to globalization, race and ethnicity, gender equity/Title IX, media/social media, performance enhancing drugs, youth specialization and the finance implications.
This seminar serves to integrate the student's coursework in sport administration by examining in depth an issue or problem of significance and special interest to the student. Research, writing, and presentation skills are employed in this course. Each student will design his/her own project, subject to approval of the faculty member, in order to fulfill the course requirements. The project shall demonstrate (1) integration of the MSA program objectives, (2) graduate-level writing skills using APA format, (3) graduate level critical thinking skills and (4) in-depth understanding and application of the objectives of the area of emphasis utilizing appropriate research techniques. A research paper and a PowerPoint presentation are required.
Prerequisites
Completion of all courses in the MSA program (may take one other course concurrently).

Theatre

An introduction to the world of theatre through a survey of its independent parts: (1) the unique qualities of its varied dramatic forms, (2) genres or types of theatre into which most plays can be categorized, and (3) the relationships that exist between an audience and the major participants of a play - playwright, director, designer and actor.
A technique-oriented approach for beginning actors. This course will provide students with both theoretical and practical experience in character analysis, research, inanimate elements of production, and voice and movement with a special emphasis on the British Method of working from the outside in.
This course introduces students to performance studies theory and embodied performance through the staged interpretation of works of fiction, nonfiction, and poetry. Students will select texts to perform, gain appreciation and understanding of their chosen texts, and communicate their interpretation of the text through purposeful performance choices on stage.
Special Topics courses are studies of selected problems, periods or movements in the subject area not otherwise included in the curriculum. They are typically chosen from a faculty member’s particular expertise and field of scholarly inquiry, and offered to a student or group of students forming an interest in the particular subject matter. The 250 designation denotes a General Education level of instruction and may include an appropriate General Education task to be completed. A Special Topics course must be approved by the School of Arts and Sciences Curriculum Committee before it is offered, and it must address one or more Major Outcomes within the discipline.
Students explore the intersections of identity, storytelling, and performance by crafting personal narratives and adapting them into staged performances. Students will explore how lived histories and experiences with friends, family and community contribute to who we are and how we move through the world while experimenting with different methods and theories for adapting written narratives texts into staged performances.