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Course Category: Education

Youth Mental Health First Aid is designed to teach parents, family members, caregivers, teachers, school staff, peers, neighbors, health and human service workers, and other caring citizens how to help an adolescent (ages 12-18) who is experiencing a mental health or addictions challenge or crisis. Youth Mental Health First Aid is primarily designed for adults who regularly interact with young people.
This course presents the history, structure, philosophy and socioeconomic factors of education in a democratic society. It deals with current issues confronting schools, including professional ethics, legal rights and responsibilities of professional educators and students. It provides the theoretical framework for additional education courses. A mandatory 20-hour practicum in a school setting runs concurrently with this course.
This course is a study of the growth and development of humans from conception to senescence with an emphasis on birth to young adulthood. Physical, cognitive, social, affective, language and moral development will be explored. Topics will also include: individual and group similarities and differences; exceptional or abnormal development; and guiding parents, caregivers, community and staff regarding the implications of the stages of development.
This course integrates the study of the principles and theories of psychology as they relate to human learning and assessment in education. It includes theories of human development, cognition and educational research, including the study and assessment of traditional and exceptional learners, learners with disabilities and gifted and talented learners. Students will obtain practical understanding and experience in designing and administering a variety of assessment formats. Special emphasis is given to the effective use of both formative and summative assessments that are directed toward meeting the needs of all learners. Both criterion and norm-referenced tests will be discussed in relation to ranges and ages and abilities of students. The processes of instructional design, motivation, classroom management, discipline, measurement and evaluation will be integrated for a comprehensive look at student learning. A general psychology course is recommended prior to this course.
This course is designed to meet the human relations and multiculturalism requirements for teacher education and certification in the state of Iowa. It includes cognitive, affective and skill components that will contribute to the development of, sensitivity to, and understanding of the values, beliefs, lifestyles and attitudes of individuals and the diverse groups found in a pluralistic society. Topics discussed are the variables of ethnicity, race, social class, gender, religion, exceptionality, language and age, and the implications for human relations and education in particular. Meets cultures requirement for general education requirements.
This course provides knowledge of grammatical aspects of the English language (nouns, verbs, adjectives, clauses, verb-subject agreement, etc.) as they relate to the development of effective oral and written communication skills.
Special Topics courses cover special topics not covered by current courses taught in the department. The particular topic selected is to be determined by the department according to the current need and interest. This course required department chair approval.
This course emphasizes effective communication techniques through the exposure to a wide array of instructional media including computer software and hardware. The use of multimedia will be utilized in a simulated classroom presentation by each pre-service educators.
This course incorporates the use of a problem-solving approach in the development of mathematical topics relevant to the K-8 elementary school teacher. Topics will be selected from the following: sets, functions and logic, numeration systems and whole numbers, integers, rational numbers, number theory, decimals, probability and statistics, geometry and concepts of measurement. This course is recommended for anyone who will be teaching mathematics in grades K-8. This course does not satisfy the general education mathematics requirement.
Students must take a separate, specific methods course for each secondary subject area in which they are seeking endorsement and licensure. The courses are intended to develop pre-service educators’ understanding and application at the secondary (grades 5-12) level of teaching strategies, classroom management, instructional planning principles and design within their specific discipline. These courses provide pre-service educators with an understanding of the modern practices, techniques and trends in their subject areas of teaching.
Prerequisites
EDU 110, EDU 319, A minimum of six credits of upper-division courses within the discipline and admittance to the Teacher Education Program
Students must take a separate, specific methods course for each secondary subject area in which they are seeking endorsement and licensure. The courses are intended to develop pre-service educators’ understanding and application at the secondary (grades 5-12) level of teaching strategies, classroom management, instructional planning principles and design within their specific discipline. These courses provide pre-service educators with an understanding of the modern practices, techniques and trends in their subject areas of teaching.
Prerequisites
EDU 110, EDU 319, A minimum of six credits of upper-division courses within the discipline and admittance to the Teacher Education Program
Students must take a separate, specific methods course for each secondary subject area in which they are seeking endorsement and licensure. The courses are intended to develop pre-service educators’ understanding and application at the secondary (grades 5-12) level of teaching strategies, classroom management, instructional planning principles and design within their specific discipline. These courses provide pre-service educators with an understanding of the modern practices, techniques and trends in their subject areas of teaching.
Prerequisites
EDU 110, EDU 319, A minimum of six credits of upper-division courses within the discipline and admittance to the Teacher Education Program
Students must take a separate, specific methods course for each secondary subject area in which they are seeking endorsement and licensure. The courses are intended to develop pre-service educators’ understanding and application at the secondary (grades 5-12) level of teaching strategies, classroom management, instructional planning principles and design within their specific discipline. These courses provide pre-service educators with an understanding of the modern practices, techniques and trends in their subject areas of teaching.
Prerequisites
EDU 110, EDU 319, A minimum of six credits of upper-division courses within the discipline and admittance to the Teacher Education Program
Students must take a separate, specific methods course for each secondary subject area in which they are seeking endorsement and licensure. The courses are intended to develop pre-service educators’ understanding and application at the secondary (grades 5-12) level of teaching strategies, classroom management, instructional planning principles and design within their specific discipline. These courses provide pre-service educators with an understanding of the modern practices, techniques and trends in their subject areas of teaching.
Prerequisites
EDU 110, EDU 319, A minimum of six credits of upper-division courses within the discipline and admittance to the Teacher Education Program
Students must take a separate, specific methods course for each secondary subject area in which they are seeking endorsement and licensure. The courses are intended to develop pre-service educators’ understanding and application at the secondary (grades 5-12) level of teaching strategies, classroom management, instructional planning principles and design within their specific discipline. These courses provide pre-service educators with an understanding of the modern practices, techniques and trends in their subject areas of teaching.
Prerequisites
EDU 110, EDU 319, A minimum of six credits of upper-division courses within the discipline and admittance to the Teacher Education Program
Students must take a separate, specific methods course for each secondary subject area in which they are seeking endorsement and licensure. The courses are intended to develop pre-service educators’ understanding and application at the secondary (grades 5-12) level of teaching strategies, classroom management, instructional planning principles and design within their specific discipline. These courses provide pre-service educators with an understanding of the modern practices, techniques and trends in their subject areas of teaching.
Prerequisites
EDU 110, EDU 319, A minimum of six credits of upper-division courses within the discipline and admittance to the Teacher Education Program
Students must take a separate, specific methods course for each secondary subject area in which they are seeking endorsement and licensure. The courses are intended to develop pre-service educators’ understanding and application at the secondary (grades 5-12) level of teaching strategies, classroom management, instructional planning principles and design within their specific discipline. These courses provide pre-service educators with an understanding of the modern practices, techniques and trends in their subject areas of teaching.
Prerequisites
EDU 110, EDU 319, A minimum of six credits of upper-division courses within the discipline and admittance to the Teacher Education Program
Students must take a separate, specific methods course for each secondary subject area in which they are seeking endorsement and licensure. The courses are intended to develop pre-service educators’ understanding and application at the secondary (grades 5-12) level of teaching strategies, classroom management, instructional planning principles and design within their specific discipline. These courses provide pre-service educators with an understanding of the modern practices, techniques and trends in their subject areas of teaching.
Prerequisites
EDU 110, EDU 319, A minimum of six credits of upper-division courses within the discipline and admittance to the Teacher Education Program
This course will focus on current best-practice, research-based methods of inquiry-based teaching and learning of science for the very young child through elementary school with an emphasis on the experimental and constructivism approach. An integrated teaching approach will be used to help pre-service educators learn to develop goals and objectives, apply the Characteristics of Effective Instruction of the Iowa Core, utilize methodologies, organize curriculum and assess learning through science content including life science, physical science, and earth-space science. Pre-service educators will develop curriculum, units and lessons based on state and national standards to use in their student teaching and teaching experiences. Science lessons will be written utilizing the 5 E’s (Engage, Explore, Explain, Extend, and Evaluate) learning cycle approach to instructional design. Integration of technology, creative arts, and classroom management as they apply to teaching and to student learning in elementary science are addressed.
Prerequisites
EDU 315 (for Elementary Education and PreK-Grade 3: Inclusive Settings majors) or EDU 319 (for Secondary majors)
This is the first of two field experience courses that provide pre-service educators with an opportunity to “see into the daily life” of the teacher so they will develop a more complete and accurate picture of the expectations for a teacher. This course is taken in conjunction with the pre-service educators’ methods course (EDU 315 Teaching Elementary Social Studies). Through this Field Experience course, pre-service educators will develop deeper understandings of the teacher as a professional who uses his/her knowledge and skills to make and carry out decisions to foster students’ educational development and school achievement. Pre-service educators will complete various activities on site for a minimum of 40 hours and they will complete various assignments to help them understand more deeply the Iowa Teaching Standards and Criteria. During seminar classes pre-service educators will receive training concerning chemical hazards they may come in contact within a school setting. They will also discuss the standards of professional conduct and ethics associated with the teaching profession. Pre-service educators will be required to teach a lesson. At the end of this forty (40) hour placement, pre-service educators will be assessed on their knowledge of the Iowa Teaching Standards and Criteria. In order to be admitted to Student Teaching, pre-service educators must successfully successfully meet the appropriate levels of performance required through the field experience assessment.
Prerequisites
Admittance to the Teacher Education Program
This is the first of two field experience courses that provide pre-service educators with an opportunity to “see into the daily life” of the teacher so they will develop a more complete and accurate picture of the expectations for a teacher. This course is taken in conjunction with the pre-service educators’ methods course (EDU 319 Methods: Secondary). Through this Field Experience course, pre-service educators will develop deeper understandings of the teacher as a professional who uses his/her knowledge and skills to make and carry out decisions to foster students’ educational development and school achievement. Pre-service educators will complete various activities on site for a minimum of 40 hours and they will complete various assignments to help them understand more deeply the Iowa Teaching Standards and Criteria. During seminar classes pre-service educators will receive training concerning chemical hazards they may come in contact within a school setting. They will also discuss the standards of professional conduct and ethics associated with the teaching profession. Pre-service educators will be required to teach a lesson. At the end of this forty (40) hour placement, pre-service educators will be assessed on their knowledge of the Iowa Teaching Standards and Criteria. In order to be admitted to Student Teaching, pre-service educators must successfully meet the appropriate levels of performance required through the field experience assessment.
Prerequisites
Admittance to the Teacher Education Program
This is the first of two field experience courses that provide pre-service educators with an opportunity to “see into the daily life” of the teacher so they will develop a more complete and accurate picture of the expectations for a teacher. This course is taken in conjunction with the pre-service educators’ methods course (either EDU 315 Teaching Elementary Social Studies or EDU 319 Methods: Secondary). Through this Field Experience course, pre-service educators will develop deeper understandings of the teacher as a professional who uses his/her knowledge and skills to make and carry out decisions to foster students’ educational development and school achievement. Pre-service educators will complete various activities on site for a minimum of 40 hours and they will complete various assignments to help them understand more deeply the Iowa Teaching Standards and Criteria. During seminar classes pre-service educators will receive training concerning chemical hazards they may come in contact within a school setting. They will also discuss the standards of professional conduct and ethics associated with the teaching profession. Pre-service educators will be required to teach a lesson. At the end of this forty (40) hour placement, pre-service educators will be assessed on their knowledge of the Iowa Teaching Standards and Criteria. In order to be admitted to Student Teaching, pre-service educators must successfully meet the appropriate levels of performance required through the field experience assessment.
Prerequisites
Admittance to the Teacher Education Program
The emphasis in this course is the impact of developmental movement experiences, healthful habits, music and dance activities, play environments, materials, and developmentally appropriate activities for children birth through elementary.
Prerequisites
EDU 315 (for Elementary, Early Childhood and Instructional Strategist majors) or EDU 319 (for Secondary majors)
This course is intended to provide a survey of visual arts activities for the prekindergarten through elementary teacher, which could be integrated into the curriculum.
Prerequisites
EDU 315 (for Elementary Early Childhood and Instructional Strategist majors) or EDU 319 (for Secondary majors)
This course is a study of the current methods and new trends in teaching a foreign language to elementary school children. Emphasis is placed on the development and organization of a foreign language curriculum, methodology, selecting materials and evaluation of learning.
Prerequisites
EDU 315 (for Elementary, Early Childhood and Instructional Strategist majors) or EDU 319 (for Secondary majors)
This course will focus on current best-practice, research-based approaches to the teaching and learning of social sciences. An integrated teaching approach will be used to help pre-service educators develop goals and objectives, apply the Characteristics of Effective Instruction of the Iowa Core, enhance content knowledge, utilize methodologies, organize curriculum and assess learning in a variety of ways. In this course, pre-service educators will initially learn to develop curriculum including unit and lesson planning. This is reinforced in other elementary education courses, such as Teaching Elementary Language Arts, Teaching Elementary Science, and Teaching Elementary Math. Pre-service educators will develop projects, lessons and units based on state and national standards to use in their student teaching and teaching experiences. Activities will include the broad areas of social sciences: history, geography, political science, civic literacy and economics. Integration of technology, classroom management, and the creative arts, as they apply to teaching and to student learning in the social sciences are addressed.
Prerequisites
EDU 110, And admittance to the Teacher Education Program
This course helps to prepare pre-service educators for teaching in secondary (middle and high) schools. Pre-service educators develop a 10 lesson interdisciplinary thematic unit (ITU) with associated lesson plans and teach a lesson from that unit. The ITU is expected to address various standards expressed in the UIU Teacher Education Program and include appropriate outcomes, objectives, activities, materials, lesson plans, and an assessment plan with associated artifacts. As pre-service educators construct the ITU, they learn about appropriate categories of instructional strategies that research has demonstrated influence student achievement. Pre-service educators also become aware of the “dimensions of learning” as a useful framework for understanding teaching and learning.
Prerequisites
EDU 110, And admittance to the Teacher Education Program
This is the second of two field experience courses that provide pre-service educators with an opportunity to “see into the daily life” of the teacher so they will develop a more complete and accurate picture of the expectations for a teacher. This course is taken in conjunction with the pre-service educators’ methods courses (EDU 305 Teaching Elementary Science, EDU 325 Teaching Elementary Mathematics, EDU 335 Teaching Elementary Language Arts, EDU 326 Developmental Reading). Through this Field Experience course, pre-service educators will develop deeper understandings of the teacher as a professional who uses his/her knowledge and skills to make and carry out decisions to foster students’ educational development and school achievement. Pre-service educators will complete various activities on site for a minimum of 40 hours and they will complete various assignments to help them understand more deeply the Iowa Teaching Standards and Criteria. Pre-service educators will be required to teach a literacy lesson and a math lesson. At the end of this forty (40) hour placement, pre-service educators will be assessed on their knowledge of the Iowa Teaching Standards and Criteria. In order to be admitted to Student Teaching, pre-service educators must successfully meet the appropriate levels of performance required through the field experience assessment.
Prerequisites
Admittance to the Teacher Education Program, Prerequisite or Corequisite: EDU 253 or EDU 325 and EDU 326
This is the second of two field experience courses that provide pre-service educators with an opportunity to “see into the daily life” of the teacher so they will develop a more complete and accurate picture of the expectations for a teacher. This course is taken in conjunction with the pre-service educators’ methods courses (EDU 300’s: Teaching Secondary School Subjects) Through this Field Experience course, pre-service educators will develop deeper understandings of the teacher as a professional who uses his/her knowledge and skills to make and carry out decisions to foster students’ educational development and school achievement. Pre-service educators will complete various activities on site for a minimum of 40 hours and they will complete various assignments to help them understand more deeply the Iowa Teaching Standards and Criteria. Pre-service educators will be required to teach a lesson. At the end of this forty (40) hour placement, pre-service educators will be assessed on their knowledge of the Iowa Teaching Standards and Criteria. In order to be admitted to Student Teaching, pre-service educators must successfully meet the appropriate levels of performance required through the field experience assessment.
Prerequisites
Admittance to the Teacher Education Program
This is the second of two field experience courses that provide pre-service educators with an opportunity to “see into the daily life” of the teacher so they will develop a more complete and accurate picture of the expectations for a teacher. This course is taken in conjunction with the pre-service educators’ methods courses (EDU 305 Teaching Elementary Science, EDU 325 Teaching Elementary Mathematics, EDU 335 Teaching Elementary Language Arts, EDU 336 Teaching K-12 Physical Education, EDU 337 Teaching K-12 Health, EDU 338 Teaching K-12 Art or EDU 339 Teaching World Languages K-12). Through this Field Experience course, pre-service educators will develop deeper understandings of the teacher as a professional who uses his/her knowledge and skills to make and carry out decisions to foster students’ educational development and school achievement. Pre-service educators will complete various activities on site for a minimum of 40 hours and they will complete various assignments to help them understand more deeply the Iowa Teaching Standards and Criteria. Pre-service educators will be required to teach a lesson. At the end of this forty (40) hour placement, pre-service educators will be assessed on their knowledge of the Iowa Teaching Standards and Criteria. In order to be admitted to Student Teaching, pre-service educators must successfully meet the appropriate levels of performance required through the field experience assessment.
Prerequisites
Admittance to the Teacher Education Program
This field experience is taken only if a student transfers a minimum of 40 hours for Field Experience II. This course is for students to acquire knowledge of the Iowa Teaching Standards 4-8 in the Field Experience II seminar.
This course incorporates the use of a problem solving approach in the development of mathematical topics relevant for the preschool through middle school teacher. Concepts include the NCTM standards, five content standards and five process standards. These include problem solving; reasoning; communication; the ability to recognize, make and apply connections; integration of manipulatives; the ability to construct and to apply multiple connected representation; and the application of content in real world experiences. Instructional methods and classroom management include the selection and use of appropriate instructional materials including technology, for the very young child through elementary age student.
Prerequisites
EDU 315 (for Elementary, Early Childhood and Instructional Strategist majors) or EDU 319 (for Secondary majors)
This course introduces pre-service educators to the instructional and pedagogical foundations of teaching elementary through secondary school students to read and write in an evidence-based literacy program. Components of the course include the major areas of reading (phonemic awareness, phonics, vocabulary, fluency, and comprehension), writing, spelling, and grammar. Students examine how reading motivation, technology integration, and classroom management are essential to a successful literacy program. Students are introduced to the role of a multi-tiered system of support in assessing, diagnosing, and evaluating student literacy learning.
Prerequisites
EDU 315 (for Elementary, Early Childhood and Instructional Strategist majors) or EDU 319 (for Secondary majors)
A survey of literature for infants, prekindergarten, kindergarten, elementary and secondary aged students together with the study of the purpose and utilization of literature in the classroom. Pre-service educators will document developmentally appropriate reading materials and activities to use in their teaching experiences. Literature is used as a model for reading and writing processes. The creative arts component of performance arts is addressed in this course including, but not limited to, storytelling, puppetry, choral reading, and poetry presentations. This course does not satisfy the general education requirement for literature.
This course will focus on current best-practice, research-based approaches to the teaching and learning of elementary language arts, which includes reading, writing, speaking, viewing, listening and visually representing. An integrated teaching approach will be utilized to help pre-service educators develop goals and objectives, apply the Effective Teaching Strategies of the Iowa Core, enhance content knowledge, utilize methodologies, organize curriculum and assess learning in a variety of ways. Pre-service educators will develop curriculum, lessons and units based on state and national standards to use in their student teaching and teaching experiences. Integration of technology, creative arts performance arts components, and classroom management, as they apply to teaching and to student learning in the language arts are addressed.
Prerequisites
EDU 315 (for Elementary, Early Childhood and Instructional Strategist majors) or EDU 319 (for Secondary majors)
Students in this course will study human growth and development related to the physical education of children in elementary, middle, and high school. Emphasis is placed on the impact of developmental movement experiences, curriculum, teacher behavior, class management, dance activities, play environments, materials, and developmentally appropriate activities. Same as EXSS 336
Prerequisites
EDU 110, EDU 319, And admittance to the Teacher Education Program
This course is a study of methods, materials, curriculum development with an emphasis on nutrition, safety and healthy lifestyle. Included is information for use in health activities and presentations for students in elementary, middle, and high school. It provides information on current health legislation and public policy. Same as EXSS 337
Prerequisites
EDU 110, EDU 319, And admittance to the Teacher Education Program
This course is intended to develop the student’s understanding and application of teaching strategies, classroom management, instructional planning principles, and design within art. This course provides students with an understanding of modern practices, techniques, and trends in art. This course also provides students with a philosophical foundation for teaching art.
Prerequisites
EDU 315 (for Elementary, Early Childhood and Instructional Strategist majors) or EDU 319 (for Secondary majors)
This course develops pre-service educators’ understanding and application of teaching strategies, classroom management, instructional planning principles, assessment, and unit design as it relates to world language. This course provides pre-service educators with an understanding of the modern practices, techniques, and trends in world language. Teaching the culture of the world language is also addressed.
This course specifies how to assess students and how to use assessment results to provide effective instruction. The following components are included: knowledge of existing standardized diagnostic reading instruments, development and implementation of informal reading inventories and teacher-developed instruments, determination of reading and writing instructional strategies (including content area reading strategies) linked to the assessment, and writing summative reports for stakeholders. A 15 clock hours tutoring experience is required.
Prerequisites
EDU 110, Prerequisite or Co-requisite: EDU 326.
This course develops the pre-service educator’s and teacher’s understanding and application of curriculum development, individual assessment of student’s reading, writing, language arts and integrated research abilities, and group management and motivation. In this course, pre-service educators and teachers accept responsibilities within the classroom setting to assist in the reading instructional program by working under the guidance of the cooperating teacher in both individualized and group reading situations. 60 clock hours of practicum required.
Prerequisites
EDU 110, EDU 326, EDU 407, Prerequisite or Corequisite: EDU 485
This course develops the pre-service educator’s and teacher’s ability to assess, evaluate and instruct students with significant difficulties in reading, language arts or content area reading. In this course, pre-service educators and teachers accept responsibilities within the classroom setting to assist in the reading instructional program by working under the guidance of the cooperating teacher in both individualized and group reading situations. 60 clock hours of practicum required.
Prerequisites
EDU 110, EDU 326, EDU 407, Prerequisite or Corequisite: EDU 485
This course provides instruction in how to develop individualized content reading skills for elementary, middle school, junior high and high school students; how to evaluate readability of textbooks and students’ ability to read texts through informal teacher made assessments (formative assessments); how to integrate technology in content area reading and how to develop strategies to assist students in reading their content area textbooks. In addition, students develop knowledge of the different types of writing and speaking; knowledge of narrative, expressive, persuasive, informational, and descriptive writing and speaking; writing as communication; and differentiated instructional strategies for reading and writing in the content areas.
Prerequisites
Prerequisite: EDU 315 (for Elementary, Early Childhood and Instructional Strategist majors) or EDU 319 (for Secondary majors)
This course will provide the requisite middle school methodology to use along with the elementary or secondary school major. Curriculum design and instructional knowledge will be presented including: teaming, pedagogy and instructional methodology for a middle school. A minimum of 15 clock hours will be spent observing and/or assisting in a middle school setting.
Prerequisites
EDU 110, And admission to the Teacher Education Program
This course will provide the requisite middle school knowledge of the growth and development of the middle school age student to include emotional, physical and mental characteristics and needs. Management of middle school students will be discussed in relation to being able to use a variety of instructional strategies learned from either elementary or secondary methods courses to modify for use with middle school age students. Specific middle school scenarios and management situations will also be discussed in relation to unique middle school management techniques. A minimum of 15 clock hours will be spent observing and/or assisting in a middle school setting.
Prerequisites
EDU 110, And admission to the Teacher Education Program
This course discusses the characteristics, social and emotional needs, and special populations of gifted children. Identification, assessment, counseling, parenting, and program interventions for gifted children are introduced.
Prerequisites
And admission to the Teacher Education Program or practicing teacher
This course provides knowledge and application of characteristics, methods, and curriculum for teaching gifted students. Methods for teaching differentiated strategies, collaborative strategies, and critical thinking strategies throughout the Prek-12 curriculum are addressed.
Prerequisites
EDU 439, And admission to the Teacher Education Program or practicing teacher
This course explains the process in identifying gifted students and how to respond with appropriate programming. Designing, conducting, and reporting program evaluation and assessment are also explained.
Prerequisites
EDU 439, And admission to the Teacher Education Program or practicing teacher
This course develops the educator’s understanding and application of curriculum, methods, assessment and program evaluation for gifted programs. Educators accept responsibilities within the classroom setting to assist the instruction program by working under the guidance of the cooperating teacher in both individualized and group situations. Sixty (60) clock hours of practicum are required in a classroom with gifted students.
Prerequisites
EDU 539, EDU 541, And Admission to the Teacher Education Program, May be taken as a corequisite with EDU 440
This course is for the purpose of developing awareness and understanding of the fundamental concepts and principles involved in writing the English language. Grammar and composition will be highlighted.
Prerequisites
EDU 110, And admittance to the Teacher Education Program, Highly recommended: 3 credit hours of foreign language at the college level
This course will assist pre-service educators and teachers to develop the capacity to address the differential learning and transition needs of culturally and linguistically diverse students. Understanding changes occurring in the American classroom and understanding significant factors in those changes, such as students and their families who are culturally and linguistically diverse, are goals of this course. Effective programming models are an additional understanding. In the context of these understandings, appropriate content-based instructional practices, accommodations to facilitate students’ access to the curriculum, and assessment of student learning become the main foci of this course.
Prerequisites
EDU 110, And admittance to the Teacher Education Program
Language Acquisition provides ideas for pre-service educators and teachers to promote oral language, reading, and writing development in English for K-12 English Language Learners. It will provide pre-service educators and teachers with language acquisition theory, classroom organization, strategies, and assessment procedures for effective English learner instruction.
Prerequisites
EDU 110, And admittance to the Teacher Education Program
This course develops the pre-service educator’s and teacher’s understanding and application of curriculum and methods in ESL. In this course, pre-service educators and teachers accept responsibilities within the classroom setting to assist in the instructional program by working under the guidance of the cooperating teacher in both individualized and group situations. Sixty (60) clock hours of practicum are required in a classroom with ELLs present.
Prerequisites
EDU 110, or co-requisite, EDU 444 and admittance to the Teacher Education Program
The course will investigate the grammatical system of English; emphasis will be placed on tools and processes used to identify, assess, and teach grammatical patterns in written and spoken English for English Language Learners.
Prerequisites
EDU 110, And admittance to the Teacher Education Program
In this course pre-service educators and teachers will study how cultural and linguistic diversity are linked and how teachers must be prepared to effectively teach students whose backgrounds are different from their own. Specifically, pre-service educators and teachers will study the following: 1) language, text, and context, 2) teacher ideologies and motivation for change, 3) issues of diversity and literacy learning, 4) out-of-classroom influences on literacy learning, and 5) sociolinguistics.
Prerequisites
EDU 110, And admittance to the Teacher Education Program
This course covers special topics not covered by current courses taught in the department. The particular topic is to be determined by the department according to the current need and interest. This course requires department chair approval.
This course is designed as professional development in environmental education for pre-service and in-service educators in all subject areas. The Environmental Issues Instruction (eii) teaching model is presented in a hands-on, inquiry-based approach. Application of the model in the classroom is required to complete the course. Emphasis is placed on using research-based instructional strategies in the teaching of this environmental issues unit. This course may be repeated with different topics.
This course is a continuation of the study of elementary and secondary reading and language arts instruction. It identifies current instructional issues and offers methods to support children and youth with a wide range of learning needs within a comprehensive literacy program. Students will use the accumulated knowledge from prior reading and language arts coursework as a basis to launch additional exploration of challenges within instruction for phonetic awareness, word identification/phonics, vocabulary, fluency, comprehension, and writing. In this context, students will critically consider and apply current research to support success for children and youth struggling with components or reading and language arts, including students participating in reading intervention, students with disabilities, and students learning English. There is a required 15 clock hour practicum.
Prerequisites
EDU 110, EDU 326, EDU 407, And admittance to the Teacher Education Program, May be taken concurrently with EDU 409 or EDU 410.
This seminar provides a foundational understanding of Math Daily 3. Emphasis is placed on research-based practices in teaching and learning, along with materials, methods, and skills used in to teach students mathematics in grades K-8. Components examined include brain research, organizing student data, brief and detailed focus lessons, differentiation in te mathematics classrom, moving from assessment to instruction, and tracking student progress. This workshop provides practitioners with the knowledge and skills to successfully implement Math Daily 3 in their own classrooms.
This course specifies how to assess students and how to use assessment results to provide effective instruction. The following components are included: knowledge of existing standardized diagnostic reading instruments, development and implementation of informal reading inventories and teacher-developed instruments, determination of reading and writing instructional strategies (including content area reading strategies) linked to assessment, and writing summative reports for stakeholders. A 15 hour tutoring experience is required.
This course develops the student’s understanding and application of curriculum development, individual assessment of student’s reading, writing, language arts and integrated research abilities, and group management and motivation at the elementary/secondary level. In this course, students accept responsibilities within the classroom setting to assist in the reading instructional program by working under the guidance of the cooperating teacher in both individualized and group reading situations. Sixty clock hours of practicum required.
Prerequisites
EDU 507, EDU 585
This course develops the student’s understanding and application of curriculum development, individual assessment of student’s reading, writing, language arts and integrated research abilities, and group management and motivation at the secondary level. In this course, students accept responsibilities within the classroom setting to assist in the reading instructional program by working under the guidance of the cooperating teacher in both individualized and group reading situations. Sixty clock hours of practicum required.
Prerequisites
EDU 507, EDU 585
This course primarily introduces Master of Education candidates in learning how to read and evaluate educational research. Candidates will also translate administrative questions into problem statements and research questions in preparation for conducting and writing a literature review. Various research designs will be studied: ethnographic, action, evaluation, descriptive, historical, correlational, experimental, quasi-experimental, and causal-comparative.
This course provides an opportunity to learn best practice related to creating effective and supportive classroom and school learning environments. In this course, learners will examine instructional strategies designed specifically to improve student feedback, enhance delivery of content, and meet the contextual needs of students. A final research paper examines actual research results supporting instructional strategies of interest.
This course focuses on the design, development, and integration of educational technology methods for teaching, learning, and personal productivity. This course engages the student in the application of current research and theory into the instructional design process. Students will complete an action research project in their specialized areas. Students should be able to use basic computer software (word processing, spreadsheets, database management) upon entrance to the program.
This course will provide the requisite middle school methodology to use along with the elementary or secondary school major. Curriculum design and instructional knowledge will be presented including: teaming, pedagogy and instructional methodology for a middle school. A minimum of 15 clock hours will be spent in observing and/or assisting in a middle school setting.
Prerequisites
Licensed teacher
This course will provide the requisite middle school knowledge of the growth and development of the middle school age student to include emotional, physical and mental characteristics and needs. Management of middle school students will be discussed in relation to being able to use a variety of instructional strategies learned from either elementary or secondary methods courses to modify for use with middle school age students. Specific middle school scenarios and management situations will also be discussed in relation to unique middle school management techniques. A minimum of 15 clock hours will be spent in observing and/or assisting in a middle school setting.
Prerequisites
Licensed teacher
This course provides the theoretical foundation for student-involved classroom assessment. The course focuses on the role of classroom assessment in measuring student understanding and achievement as well as the various methods available to assess a variety of achievement targets. It provides complete coverage of educational assessment, including developing plans that integrate teaching and assessment, evaluating students and discussing evaluations with parents. No formal coursework in statistics or college mathematics is necessary to complete the course. The course includes comprehensive treatment of traditional and alternativeassessments designed to provide practical use for classroom teachers.
This course focuses on developments in educational psychology and cognitive science as they apply to student learning and teaching. Emphasized in this course are brain-based learning, multiple intelligences, motivational theory and practice, issues related to diversity and learning as well as other current topics in educational psychology.
This course provides instruction in how to develop individualized content reading skills for elementary, middle school, junior high and high school students; how to evaluate readability of textbooks and students’ ability to read texts through informal teacher made assessments; how to integrate technology in content area reading and how to develop strategies to assist students in reading their content area textbooks. In addition, participants develop knowledge of the different types of writing; knowledge of narrative, expressive, persuasive, informational, and descriptive writing; writing as communication; and differentiated instructional strategies for reading and writing in the content areas.
This course focuses on the various instructional methods that have been identified through research to be the most effective at enhancing student achievement. Learners will investigate the targeted strategies addressed in the Selective Methods course. The intention is to provide learners enough experience with the strategies to use them effectively in the classroom.
Recognizing Everyone's Strengths by Peacebuilding, Empathizing, Communicating, and Trustbuilding
This course will assist students in developing their own understandings of historical and contemporary issues related to diversity, equity and inclusion or inclusivity. It will examine how we research and think about race, class, gender, ethnicity, nationality, religion, age, ability and sexuality. Students will explore how the issues of personal and institutional racism and classism impact student achievement, in particular the achievement gap in American K-12 schools as well as within higher education. Broader theoretical constructs related to culture and identity will be drawn upon to inform our understanding and analysis of students within the preschool to college context.
This course affords participants an opportunity to gain a deeper understanding about the effective use of professional learning communities. This course utilizes the Learning by Doing handbook for professional learning communities to help PLC leaders and participants learn how to improve PLC’s and increase their impact on student achievement. The process of creating common formative and common summative assessments will be explored as well as using the data from those assessments to improve learning. The final project for this course requires students to complete a PLC Action Plan that incorporates the concepts learned in the class to a practical plan of action for achieving an effective PLC.
This course provides a foundational understanding of the Math Daily 3 structure. Emphasis is placed on research-based practices in teaching and learning along with materials, methods, and skills used to teach students math in grades K-8. Components examined include: classroom design, brain research, motivation in teaching and learning, developing independence, organizing student data, brief and detailed focused lessons, differentiation in the mathematics classroom, moving from assessment to instruction, and monitoring student progress. This course provides practitioners with the knowledge and skills to successfully implement the Math Daily 3 structure in their own classrooms. It is the only course approved by Gail Boushey and Joan Moser, the creators of Math Daily 3.
This course focuses on the role of the instructional coach in the PreK-12 educational setting. Class participants will learn to become reflective about their own teaching effectiveness and apply that knowledge to instructional coaching practices. Teachers will learn to critique instructional delivery according to research-based models, especially Marzano’s Art and Science of Teaching Model. Class participants are expected to observe and conference with peers toward the goal of improved instruction.
This course focuses on backward design. Using the Understanding by Design framework of Wiggins and McTighe, students will design curriculum that is rigorous, engaging and connected to state or national standards. Particular attention is devoted to the alignment of goals, objectives, activities and assessments of learning. Students design actual units of instruction, integrating their knowledge of design, curriculum, methods, and assessment.
This course focuses on the societal and political contexts in which schools operate. After first becoming aware of various theories regarding educational policy issues and the various dimensions (or frames of reference) from which they can be viewed, learners will examine various issues that are likely to have an impact on classroom teaching and learning. Each week the learner will defend a personal stance based on the readings and additional supportive research. Educational policy areas likely to be considered include those having to do with governance, curriculum, accountability, personnel development, and school finance.
This course discusses the characteristics, social and emotional needs, and special populations of gifted children. Identification, assessment, counseling, parenting, and program interventions for gifted children are introduced.
Prerequisites
Licensed teacher
This course provides knowledge and application of characteristics, methods, and curriculum for teaching gifted students. Methods for teaching differentiated strategies, collaborative strategies, and critical thinking strategies throughout the PreK-12 curriculum are addressed.
Prerequisites
EDU 539, Licensed teacher
This course explains the process in identifying gifted students and how to respond with appropriate programming. Designing, conducting, and reporting program evaluation and assessment are also explained.
Prerequisites
EDU 539, Licensed teacher
This course develops the educator's understanding and application of curriculum, methods, assessment and program evaluation for gifted programs. Educators accept responsibilities within the classroom setting to assist the instruction program by working under the guidance of the cooperating teacher in both individualized and group situations. Sixty (60) clock hours of practicum are required in a classroom with gifted students.
Prerequisites
EDU 539, EDU 541, Licensed teacher, May be taken as a co-requisite with EDU 540
The course is for the purpose of developing awareness and understanding of the fundamental concepts and principles involved in writing the English language. Grammar and composition will be highlighted.
Prerequisites
Highly recommended: 3 credit hours of foreign language at the college level.
This course will assist preservice educators and teachers to develop the capacity to address the differential learning and transition needs of culturally and linguistically diverse students. Understanding changes occurring in the American classroom and understanding significant factors in those changes, such as students and their families who are culturally and linguistically diverse, are goals of this course. Effective programming models are an additional understanding. In the context of these understandings, appropriate content-based instructional practices, accommodations to facilitate students’ access to the curriculum, and assessment of student learning become the main foci of this course.
Language Acquisition provides ideas for pre-service educators and teachers to promote oral language, reading, and writing development in English for K-12 English Language Students. It will provide pre-service educators and teachers with language acquisition theory, classroom organization, strategies, and assessment procedures for effective English student instruction.
This course develops the learner's understanding and application of curriculum and methods in ESL. in this course, learners accept responsibilities within the classroom setting to assist in the instructional program by working under the guidance of the cooperating teacher in both individualized and group situations. Sixty (60) clock hours of practicum are required in a classroom with ELLs present.
Prerequisites
EDU 543, EDU 544 (Co-Requisite)
This course will investigate the grammatical system of English; emphasis will be placed on tools and processes used to identify, assess, and teach grammatical patterns in written and spoken English for English Language Students.
Prerequisites
EDU 543
In this course students will study how cultural and linguistic diversity are linked and how teachers must be prepared to effectively teach students whose backgrounds are different from their own. Specifically, students will study the following: 1) language, text, and context, 2) teacher ideologies and motivation for change, 3) issues of diversity and literacy learning, 4) out-of-classroom influences on Literacy learning, and 5) sociolinguistics.
These courses will address specific instructional approaches that are timely and relevant to current K-12 classrooms. The topics will vary based on the identified needs of K-12 teachers and the expertise available to address these needs.
This workshop provides a foundational understanding of the Literacy CAFE. Emphasis is placed on research-based practices in literacy instruction along with materials, methods, and skills used to teach students reading in grades K-8. Comonents examined include: brain research, organizing student data, brief and detailed focus lessons, differentiation in the literacy classroom, moving from assessment to instruction, and tracking student progress. This workshop provides practitioners with the knowledge and skills to successfully implement the Literacy CAFE in their own classrooms.
This workshop provides a foundational understanding of the Daily 5 structure. Emphasis is placed on research-based practices in literacy instruction along with materials, methods, and skills used to teach students reading in grades K-8. Components examined include: classroom design, brain research, motivatin in teaching and learning, developing independence, and differentiation in the literacy classroom. This workshop provides practitioners with the knowledge and skills to successfully implement the Daily 5.
This course provides a foundational understanding of both the Daily 5 structure and the LIteracy CAFE. Emphasis is placed on research-based practices in literacy instruction along with materials, methods, and skills used to teach students reading in grades K-8. Cmponents examined include: classroom design, brain research, motivation in teaching and learning, developing independence, organizing student data, brief and detailed focus lessons, differentiation in the literacy classroom, moving from assessment to instruction, and tracking student progress. This course provides practitioners with the knowledge and skills to successfully implement both the Daily 5 and Literacy Cafe in their own classrooms. It is the only course approved by Gail Boushey and Joan Moser, the creators of Daily 5 and CAFE.
This course is designed as professional development in environmental education for pre-service and in-service educators in all subject areas. The Environmental Issues Instruction (eii) teaching model is presented in a hands-on, inquiry-based approach. Application of the model in the classroom is required to complete the course. Emphasis is placed on using research-based instructional strategies in the teaching of this environmental issues unit. This course may be repeated with different topics.
Best Practices in Literacy Intervention is a course that explores best practices in interventions and reading strategies. The course will utilize the Teaching Reading Sourcebook, which will provide an exensive list of reading strategies targeted by skill area. Along with the Reading Sourcebook students in the course will examine the book Simplifying Response to Intervention to reflect on best practices when it comes to both school and district work regarding the three tiers of instruction and intervention work. This course is designed to prepare students for work in both a Reading Specialist and Leadership position.
This course examines the development, implementation and evaluation of reading programs for PreK through 12 learners. This course will provide a wide system overview of reading programs in schools focusing on the administrative responsibilities needed to oversee such programs. This course will examine carefully at how legislation impacts instruction in schools. Within the course, learners will work to promote parent and community involvement as an important partnership in literacy work.
This course is a continuation of the study of elementary and secondary reading and language arts instruction. It identifies current instructional issues and offers methods to support children and youth with a wide range of learning needs within a comprehensive literacy program. Students will use the accumulated knowledge from prior reading and language arts coursework as a basis to launch additional exploration of challenges with instruction for phonemic awareness, word identification/phonics, vocabulary, fluency comprehension, and writing. In this context, students will critically consider and apply current research to support success for children and youth struggling with components of reading and language arts, including students participating in reading intervention, students with disabilities, and students learning English. There is a required 15-clock-hour practicum.
Prerequisites
EDU 507, May be taken concurrently with EDU 509 or EDU 510.
The reading specialist/ literacy coach internship prepares teachers to collaborate with teachers in grades K-12 toward the goal of improving reading instruction. Throughout this internship candidates will utilize diagnostic reading assessments to provide research-based targeted instruction. Participants will study leadership qualities and reflect and demonstrate the skills needed to serve as a teacher leader in the area of literacy. The internship can be completed within one's own school district. The internship requires a minimum of 60 hours with a detailed log of literacy work and collaboration.
Prerequisites
Prerequisite or Co-requisite: EDU 580 and EDU 581
This seminar serves to integrate the student's coursework in education by examining in-depth an issue or problem of significance and special interest to the student. Research, writing, and presentation skills are employed in this course. Each student will design his/her own project, subject to approval of the faculty member, in order to fulfill the course requirements. The project shall demonstrate (1) integration of the M.Ed. program objectives, (2) graduate level writing skills using APA format, (3) graduate level critical thinking skills and (4) in-depth understanding and application of the objectives of the area of emphasis utilizing appropriate research techniques. A research paper and a PowerPoint presentation are required.
Prerequisites
Completion of all courses in emphasis area (may take one area of emphasis course concurrently)
This seminar serves to integrate the student’s coursework in education by examining in-depth an issue or problem of significance and special interest to the student. Research, writing, and presentation skills are employed in this course. Each student will design his/her own project, subject to approval of the faculty member, in order to fulfill the course requirements. The project shall demonstrate (1) integration of the M.Ed. program objectives, (2) graduate level writing skills using APA format, (3) graduate level critical thinking skills and (4) in-depth understanding and application of the objectives of the area of emphasis utilizing appropriate research techniques. A research paper and a PowerPoint presentation are required.
Prerequisites
Completion of all courses in emphasis area (may take one area of emphasis course concurrently)
This seminar serves to integrate the student’s coursework in education by examining in-depth an issue or problem of significance and special interest to the student. Research, writing, and presentation skills are employed in this course. Each student will design his/her own project, subject to approval of the faculty member, in order to fulfill the course requirements. The project shall demonstrate (1) integration of the M.Ed. program objectives, (2) graduate level writing skills using APA format, (3) graduate level critical thinking skills and (4) in-depth understanding and application of the objectives of the area of emphasis utilizing appropriate research techniques. A research paper and a PowerPoint presentation are required.
Prerequisites
Completion of all courses in emphasis area (may take one area of emphasis course concurrently)
This seminar serves to integrate the student’s coursework in education by examining in-depth an issue or problem of significance and special interest to the student. Research, writing, and presentation skills are employed in this course. Each student will design his/her own project, subject to approval of the faculty member, in order to fulfill the course requirements. The project shall demonstrate (1) integration of the M.Ed. program objectives, (2) graduate level writing skills using APA format, (3) graduate level critical thinking skills and (4) in-depth understanding and application of the objectives of the area of emphasis utilizing appropriate research techniques. A research paper and a PowerPoint presentation are required.
Prerequisites
Completion of all courses in emphasis area (may take one area of emphasis course concurrently)
This seminar serves to integrate the student’s coursework in education by examining in-depth an issue or problem of significance and special interest to the student. Research, writing, and presentation skills are employed in this course. Each student will design his/her own project, subject to approval of the faculty member, in order to fulfill the course requirements. The project shall demonstrate (1) integration of the M.Ed. program objectives, (2) graduate level writing skills using APA format, (3) graduate level critical thinking skills and (4) in-depth understanding and application of the objectives of the area of emphasis utilizing appropriate research techniques. A research paper and a PowerPoint presentation are required.
Prerequisites
Completion of all courses in emphasis area (may take one area of emphasis course concurrently)
This seminar serves to integrate the student’s coursework in education by examining in-depth an issue or problem of significance and special interest to the student. Research, writing, and presentation skills are employed in this course. Each student will design his/her own project, subject to approval of the faculty member, in order to fulfill the course requirements. The project shall demonstrate (1) integration of the M.Ed. program objectives, (2) graduate level writing skills using APA format, (3) graduate level critical thinking skills and (4) in-depth understanding and application of the objectives of the area of emphasis utilizing appropriate research techniques. A research paper and a PowerPoint presentation are required.
Prerequisites
Completion of all courses in emphasis area (may take one area of emphasis course concurrently)
This seminar serves to integrate the student’s coursework in education by examining in-depth an issue or problem of significance and special interest to the student. Research, writing, and presentation skills are employed in this course. Each student will design his/her own project, subject to approval of the faculty member, in order to fulfill the course requirements. The project shall demonstrate (1) integration of the M.Ed. program objectives, (2) graduate level writing skills using APA format, (3) graduate level critical thinking skills and (4) in-depth understanding and application of the objectives of the area of emphasis utilizing appropriate research techniques. A research paper and a PowerPoint presentation are required.
Prerequisites
Completion of all courses in emphasis area (may take one area of emphasis course concurrently)