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Course Category: History

This course provides a broad overview of world history, beginning with the development of agriculture in Neolithic times and ending with the Protestant Reformation in the 16th century. Major topics include ancient civilizations of Mesopotamia, Egypt, Indus Valley and Yellow River Valley; classical Greece; Roman Empire; development of Hinduism, Judaism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Taoism, Christianity and Islam; China and Japan through the 16th century; feudal Europe; the Renaissance; African societies; and pre-Columbian America and Reformation. Meets the social science requirement.
This course is a continuation of HIST 100 and provides a broad overview of world history, beginning with European expansion over the globe in the 16th century and extending through the present. Major themes examined are colonization, slavery, the Industrial Revolution, imperialism, worldwide conflicts, East vs. West, decolonization and the collapse of communism. Meets the social science requirement.
This course provides a broad overview of U.S. history, from the earliest colonial settlements through the end of the Reconstruction period following the Civil War. Major themes examined are colonial society and life, the struggle for independence, adoption of the Constitution, the early national period, sectionalism, the Civil War and Reconstruction. Meets the social science requirement.
This course is a continuation of HIST 110 and provides a broad overview of U.S. history from the end of the Reconstruction period following the Civil War through the present. Major themes examined are industrialization, urbanization, protest and reform movements, emergence of the U.S. as a world power, the Great Depression, World War II, the Cold War, the turbulent 1960s, and domestic and foreign problems of the 1970s and 1980s.
This course examines the causes, military struggles, home fronts, and consequences of both World War I and World War II. Other topics covered include the Holocaust, the rise of Nazism in Germany, Fascism in Italy, communism in the Soviet Union and Japanese militarism.
This course surveys Wisconsin’s past, and focuses on the social history of its diverse peoples. It begins with the era prior to European exploration, and ends in the 1990s. Learners will be introduced to the “Wisconsin Character” concept. Meets the social science requirement.
This course is designed to introduce students to the political, economic, and social forces that have shaped Iowa history from settlement to present. Meets the social science requirement.
This course will examine historical events and the impact they have had on a specific community or regional area of the United States. Meets the social science requirement.
This course examines how women all over the world have countered their low status and power with activism that advances the cause of global feminism. The course takes a cross cultural perspective covering women from different ethnicities, religions, backgrounds, sexual preferences, races, etc. The course will discuss women’s activism as both local and national concepts and how that activism translates into an emerging global feminism that both unites women on like issues and separates them on individual cultural issues. For the most part, this course will have a twentieth and twenty-first century focus.
Special Topics courses are studies of selected problems, periods or movements in the subject area not otherwise included in the curriculum. They are typically chosen from a faculty member’s particular expertise and field of scholarly inquiry, and offered to a student or group of students forming an interest in the particular subject matter. The 250 designation denotes a General Education level of instruction and may include an appropriate General Education task to be completed. The 450 designation denotes a senior level degree of sophistication expected in both learning and instruction. A single course may be offered at both levels simultaneously, in which case the syllabus will clearly differentiate the course expectations and assessment measures for students enrolled at each of the two levels. A Special Topics course must be approved by the School of Arts and Science Curriculum Committee before it is offered, and it must address one or more Major Outcomes within the discipline.
This course is designed to introduce students to the craft of doing history. Instead of learning about what happened in the past, this course teaches students how to research and write about historical events, including learning and understanding the various interpretations of history or historiography. Topics covered include using research tools, evaluating primary and secondary sources, proper documentation, good writing, objectivity, critical thinking, and historiography. Prerequisites: sophomore status, history majors and minors only or consent of instructor.
A study of major landmarks in the growth and development of Western Economics; the evolution of agriculture, industry, transportation and finance; the influence of government and international determinants. Note: Same as ECON 281
This course explores the political, economic, intellectual, social, and cultural history of China and Japan from the late 19th century through the present.
Prerequisites
Junior status or special permission from instructor.
This course examines the experiences of African Americans in the United States from the colonial era to the present. Topics to be covered include the Trans-Atlantic slave trade; the development of slavery; slave culture; black abolition and northern black life: the Civil War and the black war effort; emancipation and the freedmen’s community; Reconstruction; disfranchisement and segregation; Booker T. Washington and W.E.B. DuBois; black institution building; the Second World War and the black war effort; black protest movements and the civil rights era; and an assessment of the current state of blacks in American life.
A survey of U.S. foreign relations from colonial time to the present, with emphasis on the constitutional, institutional and political factors shaping the formation and execution of American diplomacy. Same as PS 342
Prerequisites
PS 100
This course provides a survey of the major themes and events in the history of women in the United States from colonial settlement to the present. Particular attention is given to how women’s experiences in the family, the work place and the political arena have been shaped and molded by persistent cultural ideals and by class and race.
Prerequisites
HIST 110
This course provides a specialized examination of world history in the Twentieth Century.
Prerequisites
HIST 101
This course examines the causes, consequences, and inter-relatedness of the American, French, Haitian, and Spanish-American Revolutions from roughly 1763 to 1840. Topics covered include rights, slavery, social justice, political philosophy, and colonialism.
Prerequisites
HIST 101 or HIST 110
This course covers the era of the New Nation, 1787-1848. It has three sections: the first covers the Early National Era, including the creation of a new government at the Constitutional Convention, the rise of political parties, and the early challenges for America’s first presidents; the second covers the era of the Market Revolution, including the second war with Britain and the beginning of the Industrial Revolution; the third covers the antebellum era, including the growth of slavery and social reform. The course will focus on the social, political, cultural, and economic aspects of the time periods covered.
Prerequisites
HIST 110
This course covers the pivotal period of the Civil War and Reconstruction, approximately 1848 to 1877. This course will cover the military, political, economic, social, and cultural events that worked to define the history of America during this period. This course is divided into three parts: The Sectional Conflict, The Civil War, and Reconstruction.
Prerequisites
HIST 110
This course focuses on American History from 1877 to 1914, focusing on the Industrial Revolution and subsequent Progressive reform movements. Other themes include the rise of Jim Crow, Populism, imperialism, urbanization, immigration, westward expansion, and American socialism.
Prerequisites
HIST 111
This course provides specialized study of the historical period examined in the second half of HIST 111. Topics include World War II, the Cold War, the Civil Rights movement, Vietnam, Watergate, stagflation, the 1980s and contemporary American life.
Prerequisites
HIST 111
Special Topics courses are studies of selected problems, periods or movements in the subject area not otherwise included in the curriculum. They are typically chosen from a faculty member’s particular expertise and field of scholarly inquiry, and offered to a student or group of students forming an interest in the particular subject matter. The 250 designation denotes a General Education level of instruction and may include an appropriate General Education task to be completed. The 450 designation denotes a senior level degree of sophistication expected in both learning and instruction. A single course may be offered at both levels simultaneously, in which case the syllabus will clearly differentiate the course expectations and assessment measures for students enrolled at each of the two levels. A Special Topics course must be approved by the School of Arts and Sciences Curriculum Committee before it is offered, and it must address one or more Major Outcomes within the discipline.
This course is the capstone course for the History major. Students will research and write original essays on a topic of their choosing.
Prerequisites
Senior standing; History majors only.