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Course Category: Biology

This course presents the basic concepts of biology; it is intended for non-science majors. Recommended to satisfy the general education requirement for science.
This course introduces students to fundamental concepts in biomolecular structure, cell biology, and genetics. This course is the first part of a two-course introductory biology sequence for majors in the biological sciences.
This course introduces students to fundamental concepts in evolution, systematics, and ecology. It will also introduce students to the diversity of life. This course is the second part of a two-course introductory biology sequence for majors in the biological sciences.
Prerequisites
BIO 135
This course provides students with a fundamental understanding of how the human body works at the molecular, cellular and organ levels, a well as with a practical knowledge of how important nutritional and dietary needs help to maintain healthy body function.
This course will introduce students to the theory of evolution by natural selection. Emphasis will be placed on examples of evolution observed in nature, in the lab and the breeding of domestic plants and animals. The course will also compare and contrast evolution with religious and philosophical perspectives.
This course introduces students to critical analysis of biological literature. Students will learn methods for carrying out scientific literature searches, reading biological literature and preparation of scientific writing. Additionally, the course will provide guidance for career preparation in the biological sciences.
Prerequisites
ENG 101, and Sophomore status.
This course examines the basic structure, taxonomy, growth, genetics and control of microorganisms, with emphasis on pathogenic species. The course concentrates on bacteria; however, fungi, protists, helminths and viruses also are discussed. The laboratory emphasizes aseptic technique, as well as common staining and biochemical testing procedures used in the identification of bacterial species. Recommended: CHEM 151
Prerequisites
BIO 135
This course is designed as an exploration of biological, physical and plant sciences of the local area.
This course surveys the animal phyla. The emphasis is on evolution and systematics, anatomy and physiology, as well as animal development.
Prerequisites
BIO 135
This course covers the theory and practice of economically reproducing plant materials, both sexually and asexually. Emphasis is placed on seed production, rooted cuttings, grafting, layering and tissue culture techniques.
Prerequisites
BIO 135
This course examines the taxonomy, anatomy, physiology, ecology and evolutionary biology of invertebrate animals.
Prerequisites
BIO 140 or BIO 220
This course surveys the phyla of photosynthetic organisms, as well as of some fungi. The emphasis is on angiosperm plant anatomy and development, as well as on organismal diversity and reproductive cycles.
Prerequisites
BIO 135
The content of special topics courses will vary each time a special topic is offered.
This course provides an introduction to the structure and function of the human body.
Prerequisites
BIO 135
This course examines the relationships between the structure and function of the human body. Topics covered include cells, tissues, integument, skeletal system, muscular system, nervous system and sensory organs. This course is the first part of a two-course sequence in anatomy and physiology.
Prerequisites
BIO 135
This course covers the structure and function of the endocrine system, circulatory system, respiratory system, digestive system, urinary system and reproductive systems. This course is the second part of a two-course sequence in anatomy and physiology.
Prerequisites
BIO 270
This course surveys the common plant species currently found in Iowa's natural areas. Emphasis will be placed on recognizing both native and introduced angiosperm species in woodlands, prairies, and wetland areas. Fieldwork will be required.
Prerequisites
BIO 140 or BIO 231
This course presents fundamental principles of classical genetics as well as an introduction to modern molecular genetics; emphasis will be placed on Mendelian genetics, linkage, gene expression and regulation, and mutation. The laboratory will emphasize the use of statistics and probability to generate and test genetic hypotheses, as well as provide an introduction to molecular genetic techniques and tools.
Prerequisites
BIO 135
Field and/or laboratory research in an area of biological sciences involving participation in the scientific process with a faculty member from the Department of Biological Sciences. Each participant will write a progress report at the end of each semester and be expected to maintain a detailed laboratory notebook. Students are expected to work (on average) a minimum of 3 hours per week over two sessions (one semester) for one hour of credit. The course may be repeated for a maximum of three credit hours if both student and faculty member agree. Prerequisite: Sophomore status and approval of the supervising faculty member along with project acceptance.
This course gives students first-hand exposure to the work environment in a specialized field of the health sciences, such as medicine, chiropractic medicine, physical therapy, pharmacy, dentistry, optometry, or veterinary medicine. It is conducted in an off-campus, independent study setting, where students observe or assist health care professionals in hospitals, clinics, or laboratories.
Prerequisites
BIO 303, and junior status
This course provides an introduction to evolutionary theory as well as a perspective on how scientists view evolutionary theory today by reading and discussing recently published books on the subject.
Prerequisites
Junior status
This course examines the taxonomy, anatomy, physiology, ecology and evolutionary biology of fish. The laboratory emphasizes identification of fish native to Iowa.
Prerequisites
BIO 140 or BIO 220
This course provides an in-depth understanding of the nutritional requirements of plants and the diagnosis of plant nutritional deficiencies and toxicities. The course will concentrate on the essential elements and their physiological role in plant growth and development. Soil nutrient availability, nutrient uptake and nutrient assimilation also will be discussed. Recommended: CHEM 115 or CHEM 151
Prerequisites
BIO 140 or BIO 231
This course examines functions that impact plant growth and development. Emphasis is placed on water relations, basic mineral nutrition, transport phenomena, photosynthesis, and hormone action. Recommended: CHEM 151
Prerequisites
BIO 140 or BIO 231
This course provides an extensive study of the structure and organization of vertebrate tissues. Emphasis is placed on the relationships between the structure and function of these tissues. The laboratory stresses identification of cell and tissue types.
Prerequisites
BIO 140 or BIO 220
This course examines the relationships between organisms and their environment, with practical applications to field biology. The course includes units that utilize techniques of ecological analysis.
Prerequisites
BIO 140 or BIO 220 or BIO 231
See description for BIO 335
This course provides a detailed study of the theories and processes of biological evolution.
Prerequisites
BIO 283, and one of the following: BIO 140 or BIO 220 or BIO 231
This course provides a detailed study of parasites, with emphasis on those infecting humans and domestic animals. The course covers life cycles, disease syndromes and host-parasite interactions. The laboratory emphasizes the identification of animal parasites.
Prerequisites
BIO 140 or BIO 220
This course provides a comprehensive examination of the biological, societal, ethical, economic, and political basis of modern conservation. This course is not only about discussing conservation problems, but also about applying quantitative methods in a rigorous scientific manner to identify solutions to these problems.
Prerequisites
BIO 335
This course involves the study of the abnormal functioning of diseased organs with application to medical procedures and patient care. This course examines the etiology, symptoms, pathogenesis, diagnosis and therapy of disease.
Prerequisites
BIO 140 or BIO 220 or BIO 268 or BIO 270
This course involves the microscopic study of diseased tissue, including preparation of sample tissue. Corequisite: BIO 370
This course covers humoral and cellular immunity. The topics include but are not limited to antibodies, membrane receptors for antigen, regulation of the immune response, and antigen-antibody interactions. Topics in applied immunology include hypersensitivity, tumor immunity, autoimmunity, transplant rejection and immunological tests.
Prerequisites
BIO 283
This course provides an in-depth overview of the living cell and highlights the molecular and biochemical aspects impacting cell structure and function. Emphasis is placed on the structure and function of various cellular organelles and membranes, along with their roles in metabolism, transport, and cell communication. Recommended CHEM 151
Prerequisites
BIO 283
This course introduces students to avian evolution, flight, anatomy, physiology, ecology, and conservation. In addition, students will actively survey birds in the field to conduct estimates of avian diversity and density.
Prerequisites
BIO 140 or BIO 220
This course will provide a conceptual understanding of many aspects of mammalian biology and will provide a detailed understanding of mammalian anatomy, diversity, and natural history (especially of local forms), as well as some of the techniques that mammalogists use to acquire such knowledge.
Prerequisites
BIO 140 or BIO 220
This course examines the taxonomy, anatomy, physiology, ecology and evolutionary biology of amphibians and reptiles.
Prerequisites
BIO 140 or BIO 220
In this lab-based course, students will learn modern molecular techniques for purification, modification and analysis of DNA. This includes genomic DNA extraction, plasmid purification, polymerase chain reaction, cloning, restriction digestion and DNA sequencing. The course serves as an introduction to DNA laboratory techniques that may be especially useful for students interested in pursuing careers in research or in attending graduate or professional school.
Prerequisites
Successful completion with a B+ or higher of BIO 135 or successful completion with a C or better of BIO 283 AND successful completion with a C or higher of CHEM 152, or permission of the instructor.
Practical and theoretical laboratory based training on current molecular tools and techniques used in the field of cell biology and protein research. Topics ranging from bacterial and eukaryotic cell culture, cloning and protein expression, to methods of protein purification and immunological detection will be covered. Students will be expected to read and analyze primary literature to help them solve problems within the laboratory.
Prerequisites
Successful completion (with a “C” or higher) of both BIO 283 and CHEM 152, or permission of the instructor.
Students will complete the literature review portion of their project under the supervision of a science faculty member. The literature review will culminate in the completion of a paper reviewed by the students’ project advisor. This course is the first part of a two-course capstone experience for several majors in the natural sciences.
Prerequisites
Junior status
This course describes the biology of cancer, including the molecular changes of cancer initiation and progression, the dysfunctional cellular and tissue processes that make cancer difficult to treat, and the clinical implications for cancer as a disease. This course is intended for upper-level students of biology and pre-professional interests. It builds significantly from concepts learned in Genetics and Cell and Molecular Biology.
Prerequisites
BIO 381
This course provides an in-depth overview of the principles underlying plant disease, including causes of disease, as well as the mechanisms of dissemination, pathogenicity, and control of disease. The course also will cover the disease cycle, the physiological effects of disease and the methods of plant defense against disease.
Prerequisites
BIO 140 or BIO 231
Wildlife management can range from protecting and conserving endangered species, to increasing the number of trophy game species, to controlling pest species. In this course we will discuss how the understanding of wildlife ecology, history, policy, public wants, and math help shape the decisions a wildlife manager makes in the real world.
Prerequisites
BIO 430, and MATH 105 or MATH 107
This course examines the philosophy of managing fish populations and introduces students to techniques used to manage various species and the ecosystems they inhabit.
Prerequisites
BIO 335, and MATH 105 or MATH 107
The content of special topics courses will vary each time a special topic is offered.
The protection of the wildlife resource (including threatened and endangered species and game species) is not possible without wildlife law enforcement. This course covers techniques for determining time of death, species identification, data collection and preservation of evidence for wildlife law enforcement cases, as well as advanced technologies available for identification and individualization of evidence. Fulfills an upper division Biology or Forensics Science elective.
Prerequisites
A 300-level biology laboratory course.
Stream ecology involves the study of streams, rivers and their watersheds. This course examines the physical environment of streams, the organisms occupying streams, and the interactions between these organisms and their environment. Corequisite: GEOG 356
Prerequisites
BIO 335
This course is an in-depth study of the insects emphasizing anatomy, physiology, ecology, evolution and taxonomy.
Prerequisites
BIO 140 or BIO 220
Students will complete an independent project under the supervision of a science faculty member. This will include a paper reviewed by the student’s project advisor and an oral presentation presented to the science faculty.
Prerequisites
Senior status
Students will complete an independent project under the supervision of a science faculty member. This will include a paper reviewed by the student’s project advisor and an oral presentation presented to the science faculty. This course is the second part of a two-course capstone experience for several majors in the natural sciences.
Prerequisites
BIO 398