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Course Category: Sociology

A basic introduction to sociology as a scientific analysis of the social relations and practices of human beings. Specific attention is given to social psychology, various forms of social stratification and inequality, social institutions and social change. Meets the social science requirement.
A critical investigation of selected social problems: their causes, development and the alternative social policies that address these problems. Topics will include: substance abuse, the problems of family life, poverty and its relation to different forms of social inequality. Meets the social science requirement.
An analysis of group behavior in small and large groups of various types. The focus is on social interaction in the formation and operation of groups, and on the social system’s approach to understanding group behavior. Same as PSY 232. Meets the social science requirement.
This course provides sociological perspectives for recognizing the diversity within our society and for analyzing the development and current position of complex subcultures within the structure of modern America. Meets firstly the cultures requirement or secondly the social science requirement, but not both.
Special Topics courses are studies of selected problems, periods or movements in the subject area not otherwise included in the curriculum. They are typically chosen from a faculty member’s particular expertise and field of scholarly inquiry, and offered to a student or group of students forming an interest in the particular subject matter. The 250 designation denotes a General Education level of instruction and may include an appropriate General Education task to be completed. The 450 designation denotes a senior level degree of sophistication expected in both learning and instruction. A single course may be offered at both levels simultaneously, in which case the syllabus will clearly differentiate the course expectations and assessment measures for students enrolled at each of the two levels. A Special Topics course must be approved by the School of Arts and Sciences Curriculum Committee before it is offered, and it must address one or more Major Outcomes within the discipline.
An analysis of the changing cultural notions and social realities regarding male/female roles and relationships. Topics may include: cross-cultural research concerning gender differences; the role of various socializing agents in shaping sexual identities; and the effects of gender differences on political and economic processes. Same as PSY 260. Meets the social science requirement.
Prerequisites
SOC 110 or PSY 190
This course explores the impacts of globalization on social institutions, structures, and relationships. Particular emphasis is placed on global economies, organizations, and political arrangements and their roles in shaping world inequality, cultural change, and environmental impacts. Students will be required to demonstrate understanding of global societies and networks, and their position in the global society.
This course presents the social aspects of human behavior, including personal perception, social cognition, attitude formation and change, attribution, prosocial behavior and interpersonal attraction. Same as PSY 310.
Prerequisites
SOC 110 or PSY 190
This course is an introduction to use of the scientific method of observation in sociology. Quantitative and qualitative research approaches are defined. Data collection techniques including experiments, survey research, field research, and unobtrusive observation are addressed in detail. Population sampling strategies and data analysis techniques are covered.
Prerequisites
MATH 220
Basic theories of the causes and consequences of deviant behavior, the contribution of agents and agencies of social control in the labeling of deviant actors and their subsequent careers.
Prerequisites
SOC 110
This course represents a sociological approach to understanding the family as a social institution: courtship, marital and family practices, the family as an agent of socialization, and changes in the family in the 20th century.
Prerequisites
SOC 110
This course represents a sociological approach to understanding the family as a social institution: courtship, marital and family practices, the family as an agent of socialization, and changes in the family in the 20th century.
Prerequisites
SOC 110
This course explores the assumptions, strategies and techniques used in the delivery of human services, as well as problem identification and skill development. Same as PSY 375.
Prerequisites
SOC 110 or PSY 190
This course is designed to educate the prospective human services/social worker with the newly emerging client population in America and to recognize the impact of the interaction between clients and their environments, looking at cultural barriers, diverse at-risk populations and the systems that sustain at-risk clients. Same as PSY 377.
Prerequisites
PSY 375, Or permission of the instructor
This course addresses the manifestation and use of power in society. Three major theories of social power are addressed. The negotiation of power arrangements between groups and the institutionalization of power within state structures is addressed. Particular emphasis is placed on the role of social power in determining resource distributions, inequality, and the formation of laws.
An analysis of individual, group and cultural influences on human behavior. The emphasis is on contrasting levels of analysis and application to a variety of environmental settings. Note: Some background in both psychology and sociology is strongly recommended. Same as PSY 383.
Prerequisites
SOC 110 or PSY 190
An analysis of social policies in the United States, with emphasis on the dimensions of choice and alternative policies, along with assessment of contemporary social welfare issues, programs and legislation.
Prerequisites
SOC 110
Development of social theory from Auguste Compte to Anthony Giddens. A critical appreciation of the concepts, models and analytical schemes employed in contemporary theories.
Prerequisites
Junior status and nine credits of sociology
Applied Research Methods is the capstone experience for sociology majors. Students will demonstrate their understanding of sociological theory and methods of scientific, sociological inquiry. Students will be required to demonstrate understanding of the discipline of sociology through formation of a sociological research question, completing a review of current literature, and developing a research proposal.
Special Topics courses are studies of selected problems, periods or movements in the subject area not otherwise included in the curriculum. They are typically chosen from a faculty member’s particular expertise and field of scholarly inquiry, and offered to a student or group of students forming an interest in the particular subject matter. The 250 designation denotes a General Education level of instruction and may include an appropriate General Education task to be completed. The 450 designation denotes a senior level degree of sophistication expected in both learning and instruction. A single course may be offered at both levels simultaneously, in which case the syllabus will clearly differentiate the course expectations and assessment measures for students enrolled at each of the two levels. A Special Topics course must be approved by the School of Arts and Sciences Curriculum Committee before it is offered, and it must address one or more Major Outcomes within the discipline.
A compilation of student work produced for completion of the Sociology Minor, along with evaluation of that work. Required for successful completion of the Sociology Minor.
Prerequisites
Completion of (or current enrollment in) all courses required for the Sociology minor
A capstone project intended to integrate the general education learning outcomes with the learning outcomes in the major demonstrating baccalaureate level achievement.
Prerequisites
ENG 102, And 30 or fewer credits remaining to be completed through UIU