Skip to content

Course Category: English

This workshop is offered in conjunction with English 101 and is designed for students who need further instruction nd assistance in a small group setting. This workshop is graded on a pass/fail basis only.
This workshop is offered in conjunction with English 102 and is designed for students who need further instruction and assistance in a small group setting. This workshop is graded on a pass/fail basis only.
This course provides instruction and practice in reading comprehension and vocabulary development. Students may be assigned into this course based on the Accuplacer Computerized Placement test results and high school transcripts. Other students desiring additional help may also register for the course.
This course is designed for students who demonstrate a need for help in written composition including skills development in basic sentence structure and syntax. It prepares students for potential success on a challenge examination to determine readiness for ENG 101, but it does not include academic credit toward a degree.
This course prepares students with limited writing experience for the General Education writing sequence. Emphasis is on grammar, organization and structure of English composition, and on revision processes. Multiple writing assignments of varied lengths and complexities are assigned. Designed for first time freshman students who have not scored at least 18 on the verbal portion of the ACT test. This course does not count toward the completion of the English major.
This course includes study and practice of rhetorical conventions and styles, including description, narration, explanation and argument. Students are expected to have already demonstrated college-ready skills in grammar and sentence structure evidenced by a score of 18 or higher on the verbal section of the ACT test or the satisfactory completion of a challenge examination. Emphasis is on the development of a sound understanding of rhetorical principles, and written compositions are regularly assigned. This course does not count toward the completion of the English major.
Prerequisites
ACT (verbal portion) of at least 18 or the completion of ENG 100 or successful performance on challenge examination
This course provides study and practice of expository writing techniques, with emphasis on persuasion, argument, critical evaluation and the use of research material. A formal research paper is required among the regularly assigned written compositions. This course does not count toward the completion of the English major.
Prerequisites
ENG 101
English 122/222/322 courses are for students preparing to be writing consultants or prospective teachers who want practice providing feedback to student writers, improve writing and presentation skills, and further their knowledge about collaborative learning in a writing center. ENG 122, 222, and 322 run concurrently. Note: Enrollment in this course serves as a requirement for work placement in the Writing Center.
Prerequisites
ENG 101, ENG 201 or concurrent enrollment in ENG 201
This course concentrates on the reading of selected short fiction and poetry, presenting and introduction to literary analysis, interpretation and evaluation. Meets the humanities requirement.
An introduction to writing in a variety of literary genres, including fiction, poetry, and creative nonfiction. The course will encourage students to solve creative problems by the creation of original work using literary elements and a variety of techniques. Both study and practice of the genres is expected. Students will also critically respond to the work of their peers.
Prerequisites
ENG 101
A survey of major American authors from the colonial period to the Civil War. The focus is on the evolution of a unique national literature and a characteristic world view. Meets the humanities requirement.
A survey of major American authors from the Civil War to the present. The focus is on trends in American literature since the turn of the 20th century. Meets the humanities requirement.
A survey of British literature from Beowulf through the end of the 18th century. The focus is on major authors and significant historical influences in the development of British literature. Meets the humanities requirement.
A survey of British literature from the publication of Lyrical Ballads in 1798 to the present. Meets the humanities requirement.
Survey of world literature, British and American excluded, from the Renaissance to the present. This survey will include selections from masterpieces of African, Arabic, Asian, Caribbean, European, Australasian, Indian, Latin American, and Russian fiction, drama, and poetry in translation. Selections will vary depending on the session. Meets the humanities requirement.
A survey of the major themes and genres in Western mythology, the foundational narratives of the Western literary and artistic traditions. Myths and myth-patterns from both classical Greek and Roman authors as well as those from Scandinavian/Germanic and Egyptian cultures will be examined, including their influence from ancient to modern times. Meets the humanities requirement.
ENG 122/222/322 courses are for students preparing to be writing consultants or prospective teachers who want practice providing feedback to student writers, improve writing and presentation skills, and further their knowledge about collaborative learning in a writing center. ENG 122, 222, and 322 run concurrently. Note: Enrollment in this course serves as a requirement for work placement in the Writing Center.
Prerequisites
ENG 122
This course draws upon a wide range of poetic experience, exploring what poetry is, how it works, and what is required to enter and traverse the world of a poem. Meets the humanities requirement.
Exploration of the mystery story by examining its historical development from the mid-nineteenth century to the present, and by examining a spectrum of writers-mystery specialists and literary writers from Europe, America, South Africa and Latin America. Techniques and development will be discussed and evaluated. Meets the humanities requirement.
Special Topics courses are studies of selected problems, periods or movements in the subject area not otherwise included in the curriculum. They are typically chosen from a faculty member’s particular expertise and field of scholarly inquiry, and offered to a student or group of students forming an interest in the particular subject matter. The 250 designation denotes a General Education level of instruction and may include an appropriate General Education task to be completed. The 450 designation denotes a senior level degree of sophistication expected in both learning and instruction. A single course may be offered at both levels simultaneously, in which case the syllabus will clearly differentiate the course expectations and assessment measures for students enrolled at each of the two levels. A Special Topics course must be approved by the School of Liberal Arts Curriculum Committee before it is offered, and it must address one or more Major Outcomes within the discipline.
Survey of African American writing, film and thought from colonial times to the present, with emphasis in the developing relationship between the larger American culture and African American reactions and contributions to it. May be used to fulfill the humanities or cultures requirement, but not both.
Students in this course will study the techniques of reading and writing short stories, poems, and creative non-fiction. They will evaluate creative work, both their own and that of established, published authors, for style, dialogue, character, tone, narrative, form, and voice. Students will become familiar with what makes good writing, as well as spend time writing their own creative work.
Prerequisites
ENG 170
Study of television programs and programming from the "Golden Age" to the present. Analysis of television's relation to postmodern American literature, culture, and aesthetics. Same as COMM 275.
An introduction to narrative fiction films, using concepts of art, theatre and literature, and including a study of film aesthetics from a historical perspective. Same as COMM 290.
Opportunity to develop professional competence in expository and research writing and to enhance one's sense of the English language and its structure. Designed for upper class students preparing for careers in professions which emphasize written communication skills.
This is a course in the history and aesthetics of African American film. It includes study and analysis of films made primarily, although not exclusively, by African American directors and utilizing largely African American casts and crews. It will approach these films from both social and aesthetic perspectives and investigate commonalities among them as well as overall shifts in the perspectives which inform them.
Prerequisites
ENG 101, Recommended: ENG 102. Encouraged: ENG 290 or ENG 265
ENG 122/222/322 courses are for students preparing to be writing consultants or prospective teachers who want practice providing feedback to student writers, improve writing and presentation skills, and further their knowledge about collaborative learning in a writing center. ENG 122, 222, and 322 run concurrently. Note: Enrollment in this course serves as a requirement for work placement in the Writing Center.
Prerequisites
ENG 222
An introduction to Shakespeare’s writing through an analysis of selected tragedies, comedies, histories, and poems. The goal of this course is to make Shakespeare accessible to 21st century audiences from both literary and performance perspectives. Meets the humanities requirement.
Prerequisites
ENG 102
A survey of American and British poetry and prose from WWII to the present day. The course will concentrate on specific form, content, meaning and symbolism singular to this period. The course will analyze the emerging trends of “modern” literature and the effects of social mores upon the genre.
Prerequisites
ENG 101
This course traces the historical and cultural development of literature for young adults. The course will include a critical study and evaluation of books written for and marketed to adolescents. Does not satisfy the general education requirement for literature or education.
Prerequisites
ENG 101
This course looks in depth at the literary traditions inherent in J.R.R. Tolkien's works, including fairy and folktale motifs as well as several major trends in English epic literature presented in both text and film adaptations. Meets the humanities requirement.
Prerequisites
ENG 102 recommended
A study of the historical development of the English novel and its influences as a distinct literary type. The course includes a critical study of representative works by several major British and American novelists.
Prerequisites
ENG 101
A survey of the scholarly, saucy, and salacious English literature of the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries, when English became a recognized language of literary expression and exploration. This course will examine some of the major works that emerged from this period, including Arthurian legends, Pearl, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, and Piers Plowman, as well as key genres such as romances and devotional writings: exploring both what “literature” meant to writers in late medieval England, and also what it meant to be writing in English at the time.
Prerequisites
ENG 101
A survey of the broad-ranging literature of the “eighteenth” century-from the restoration of the English monarchy in 1660 to the rise of Romanticism- including poetry, prose, drama and, to a lesser degree, philosophical treatises.
Prerequisites
ENG 101
This class introduces students to best selling books from the New York Times best seller list in order to learn more about the American psyche, what energizes a writer in creating a book, how long it takes a writer to create a book and what factors cause a book to become a best seller. Meets the humanities requirement.
Prerequisites
ENG 101
Focused study of the major British poets of the 19th Century including William Wordsworth, John Keats, Robert Browning and Alfred Lord Tennyson among others.
Prerequisites
ENG 101
Investigation of the flowering of African American art and culture during the 1920s and beyond in the phenomenon generally known as the Harlem Renaissance. Includes consideration of music and design as well as of literature in the developing social milieu.
Prerequisites
ENG 101
An examination of the image of women presented in literature, contrasting traditional and contemporary, male and female depictions. The emphasis is on the writings of women. Meets the humanities requirement.
Prerequisites
ENG 101
This course provides the opportunity to develop skill in writing, to improve sense of language structure and to find satisfaction in written communication. The emphasis is on the development of a personal expository style.
Prerequisites
ENG 170, ENG 270
This workshop is designed to give students intensive practice in story craft through writing and evaluating their own work, and critiquing the work of their peers. Emphasis will be placed on revising, re-imagining, developing, shaping and polishing student writing.
Prerequisites
ENG 170, ENG 270
This workshop is designed to give students intensive practice in crafting poetry through writing and evaluating their own work, and critiquing the work of their peers. Emphasis will be placed on revising, re-imagining, developing shaping, and polishing student writing.
Prerequisites
ENG 170, ENG 270
This course explores imaginative responses to the experience of the Middle West, from pioneer times through the mid-20th century. Meets the humanities requirement.
Prerequisites
ENG 101
Consideration of the major voices of and influences on the development of a distinctive American literature in the mid-19th century. Includes study of Emerson, Thoreau, Melville, Longfellow, Dickinson and Whitman.
Prerequisites
ENG 101
This course examines the principles that determine the judgement of literary critics and writers. Emphasis is on the historical development of critical theory from Plato to the present day.
Prerequisites
Completion of one sequence of British, American, or World literature
Special Topics courses are studies of selected problems, periods or movements in the subject area not otherwise included in the curriculum. They are typically chosen from a faculty member’s particular expertise and field of scholarly inquiry, and offered to a student or group of students forming an interest in the particular subject matter. The 250 designation denotes a General Education level of instruction and may include an appropriate General Education task to be completed. The 450 designation denotes a senior level degree of sophistication expected in both learning and instruction. A single course may be offered at both levels simultaneously, in which case the syllabus will clearly differentiate the course expectations and assessment measures for students enrolled at each of the two levels. A Special Topics course must be approved by the School of Arts and Sciences Curriculum Committee before it is offered, and it must address one or more Major Outcomes within the discipline.