Project Stand UP

messages of hope posted on wall

Mission Statement

Upper Iowa’s CCRT is committed to transforming our campus culture and community into an environment that promotes justice, compassion and equality for all survivors of violence including sexual, domestic, dating and stalking.

Student Conduct - see the Student Handbook

Sexual Assault

  • Forced or coerced sexual contact
  • Behavior that happens without consent

Sexual assault includes rape, attempted rape, and sexual harassment or threats. One in five women and one in sixteen men have been raped and almost half of women have experienced another type of sexual assault. If you have been sexually assaulted, it is not your fault.

If you or someone you know has been sexually assaulted, you have the right to know what options are available to you.

To discuss your options, contact:

  • Confidential Reporting: Crystal Cole
    Director of Counseling and Wellness
    Student Life Office
    563.425.5786
  • Confidential Reporting and Assistance
    Student Life Office
    563.425.5786
  • Iowa Victim Service Call Center
    1.800.770-1650 or text "iowahelp" to 20121
  • Local Sexual Assault Hotline
    1.888.557.0310

Dating Violence

Dating violence is a type of intimate partner violence. It occurs between two people in a close relationship. The nature of dating violence can be physical, emotional, or sexual.

Physical—This occurs when a partner is pinched, hit, shoved, slapped, punched, or kicked.

Psychological/Emotional—This means threatening a partner or harming his or her sense of self-worth. Examples include name calling, shaming, bullying, embarrassing on purpose, or keeping him/her away from friends and family.

Dating violence can take place in person or electronically, such as repeated texting or posting sexual pictures of a partner online. Victims often think some behaviors, like teasing and name calling, are a “normal” part of a relationship. However, these behaviors can become abusive and develop into more serious forms of violence. Dating violence is a widespread issue that has serious long-term and short-term effects. Many victims do not report it because they are afraid to tell friends and family.

Domestic Violence

Domestic violence is a pattern of abusive behavior in any relationship that is used by one partner to gain or maintain power and control over another intimate partner.

This includes any behaviors that intimidate, manipulate, humiliate, isolate, frighten, terrorize, coerce, threaten, blame, hurt, injure, or wound someone.

Even though some victims appeared satisfied with not reporting the incident, nearly one in three victims said, in hindsight, they wished they had sought help from the police or another professional service sooner than they did and 14 percent said they wished they had left the relationship earlier.

Stalking

Stalking refers to any unwanted contact between two people that directly or indirectly communicates a threat or places the victim in fear.

Behavior by any individual, such as following a person, appearing at a person’s home or place of business, making harassing phone calls, leaving written messages or objects, or vandalizing a person’s property.

  • Local Sexual Assault Hotline
    1.888.557.0310

One in six women and one in 19 men have been stalked.

 

individuals standing on stairs in behind we stand against sexual assault banner

Project Stand UP

This project was supported by Grant No. 2016-WA-AX-0021 awarded by the Office on Violence Against Women, US Department of Justice. The opinions, findings, conclusions, and reccomendations expressed in this publication are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Department of Justice, Office on Violence Against Women.