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OAR Day

First Year Seminar Sections and Descriptions

Andres School of Education

Session 1

Motivation in Sport & Life (2 sections)

Through an introduction of sport motivation theories, students will explore and practice motivational strategies for sport, college, and life. Application of the motivational skills will help students engage fully in their learning process and assist with the transition to college.

Professor Rachel Majewski, Assistant Professor of Athletic Training
FYS 102 1A MW 12:50-1:50pm
FYS 102 1B TR 12:50-1:50pm

ABC’s for Educational Success

This course provides an overview of how to successfully transition to college. Topics include money management, expectations for college, self-identity and self-advocacy.

Dr. Billie Cowley, Associate Professor of Education
FYS 102 1C MW 8:00-9:00am

Dr. Gina Kuker, Associate Professor of Education
FYS 102 1D TR 9:25-10:25am

Session 2

Leadership in Sport & Life (2 Sections)

These FYS sections will focus on leadership in and out of the classroom, on and off the field, court or mat, and within the work setting.

Professor Karla Gavin, Associate Professor of Exercise and Sport Studies
FYS 112 2A TR 10:50-11:50am
FYS 112 2B TR 12:50-1:50pm


ABCs: Academics, Behaviors, Careers

This course is developed for students interested in education. The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People by Steven Covey will guide the learning for leadership skills. Study skills and test preparation will also be explored. An examination of teaching positions, endorsement options, and the job market will be investigated.

Dr. Billie Cowley, Associate Professor of Education
FYS 112 2C MW 8:00-9:00am

Dr. Gina Kuker, Associate Professor of Education
FYS 112 2D TR 9:25-10:25am

School of Business

Session 1

Mind Your Own Business 
What can I do with a Business major? More than you think…

In this class, you will explore the opportunities created by a business career and develop skills which enable you to be a success – financially and personally. This course includes hands-on activities with active learning experiences. Here’s what you can expect:
    • Become financially literate – no matter how much you already know
    • Explore business career opportunities
    • Investigate what interests you within our eight majors and ten minors
    • Discover campus resources to help you be successful in class
    • Connect with awesome business groups and organizations on campus
    • Uncover what makes you tick--become more self-aware through self-assessment
    • Other amazing things that we don’t have the space to mention!

Dr. Rich Patrick, Professor of Business
FYS 101 1A MR 9:25-10:25am

Dr. Blair Seim, Assistant Professor of Accounting
FYS 101 1B TF 9:25-10:25am

Dr. Summer Zwanziger Elsinger, Associate Professor of Management and Marketing
FYS 101 1C MR 8:00-9:00am
FYS 101 1D TF 8:00-9:00am


Session 2

Mind Your Own Business 
What can I do with a Business major? More than you think…

In this class, you will explore the opportunities created by a business career and develop skills which enable you to be a success – financially and personally. This course includes hands-on activities with active learning experiences. Here’s what you can expect:
    • Become financially literate – no matter how much you already know
    • Explore business career opportunities
    • Investigate what interests you within our eight majors and ten minors
    • Discover campus resources to help you be successful in class
    • Connect with awesome business groups and organizations on campus
    • Uncover what makes you tick--become more self-aware through self-assessment
    • Other amazing things that we don’t have the space to mention!

Dr. Rich Patrick, Professor of Business
FYS 111 2A MR 12:50-1:50pm

Dr. Blair Seim, Assistant Professor of Accounting
FYS 111 2B TF 12:50-1:50pm

Dr. Summer Zwanziger Elsinger, Associate Professor of Management and Marketing
FYS 111 2C MR 10:50-11:50am
FYS 111 2D TF 10:50-11:50am

School of Liberal Arts

Session 1

Critical Thinking, Cultural Myths, and the Graphic Novel

In this course learners will read, discuss, critique, analyze, question, and create a variety of texts to explore the connections between critical thinking, cultural myth, and the graphic novel. Specifically, this First Year Seminar course seeks to draw valuable connections between the life of learners transitioning to college, the critical thinking and questioning skills necessary to succeed in higher education, and the cultural myths, biases, and stereotypes that all learners grapple with intellectually and emotionally. All facets of this course will be connected, developed, and analyzed through the literary lens of the graphic novel.

Ms. Katie Kress, Writing Center Manager
FYS 103 1B TR 11:00-12:00pm

Environmental Art: Designing a Better World

This first year seminar course examines the Environmental Art movement by examining the responses of artists and designers to their given environments. This course introduces students to environmental art and design through basic concepts, techniques, and studio practice. We will explore the impact of this art through the perspective of art history and cultural history, and we will work within the UIU campus to create collaborative works of art.

Professor Elissa Wenthe, Associate Professor of Art
FYS 103 1C MR 11:00-12:00pm


Speaking Out: Public Intellectualism, Media Literacy, and Activism in College

College is much more than just getting a job after graduation. College is also about finding your voice, learning to communicate fearlessly and with purpose, and preparing to meaningfully participate with a marketplace of ideas. This seminar prepares students for an active college experience by emphasizing the value of paying attention to the worlds around us, of practicing critical thinking and critical literacy of both mass- and socially-media realities, and teaches practical oral and written communication skills useful for entering into dialogue on matters of social significance. 
Students explore these ideas by studying the value of a liberal arts education in a democratic society. They will learn about the importance of critical media literacy and of paying attention to the news and to political and cultural developments that affect their lives. While exploring these topics through discussion and response to selected articles from insightful publications such as The Guardian, The Atlantic, and accessible scholarly journals such as The Journal of Popular Culture/American Culture, students will practice their oral and written skills by crafting essays and performances in which they practice advocacy and criticism on topics of social and political significance to their daily lives.

Dr. Matt Foy, Assistant Professor of Communication
FYS 103 1D TR 2:10- 3:10pm

Session 2

Critical Thinking, Cultural Myths, and the Graphic Novel

In this course learners will read, discuss, critique, analyze, question, and create a variety of texts to explore the connections between critical thinking, cultural myth, and the graphic novel. Specifically, this First Year Seminar course seeks to draw valuable connections between the life of learners transitioning to college, the critical thinking and questioning skills necessary to succeed in higher education, and the cultural myths, biases, and stereotypes that all learners grapple with intellectually and emotionally. All facets of this course will be connected, developed, and analyzed through the literary lens of the graphic novel.

Ms. Katie Kress, Writing Center Manager
FYS 113 2B TR 11:00-12:00pm

Selfie: Self Portraiture in the Digital Age

This first year seminar course examines the self -portraiture in the digital age by examining the “selfie”. This course introduces students to fine art, portraiture the use and manipulation of digital tools through design using basic concepts, techniques, and studio practice. We will explore the impact of portraiture through the perspective of art history and cultural history.

Professor Laura Colby, Assistant Professor of Art
FYS 113 2C MR 11:00-12:00pm

Technology Use and Abuse

This seminar will discuss society’s reliance on technology and how individuals are becoming more dependent on technology than ever before. We will explore generational differences in technology use and preferences. We will also explore technology use and abuse in a variety of different settings and circumstances (e.g., technology use in education, work environments, and at home). We will discuss such questions as: Is it possible to create a healthy balance of technology use? Is it possible to function in society if you are “unplugged”? Is society too reliant on technology? How are other cultures using or abusing technology and how does that compare to the United States? Assigned readings, video clips, and active discussion will make up class components.

Dr. Melinda Heinz, Assistant Professor of Psychology
FYS 113 2D TR 1:00-2:00pm

School of Science & Mathematics

Session 1

First Year Seminar for S.T.E.M. Professions

You will learn the critical role S.T.E.M. professionals play in the functioning of our society and in shaping our future, and how you can contribute to creating a better world. This course helps you identify your personal and professional goals, and approaches and strategies you can implement to overcome barriers to their achievement. You will learn what it means to be a professional in today’s information economy, including Environmental Science, Information Technology, Information Systems, Software Engineering, Mathematics, and Actuarial Science. Undecided students who are interested in these careers may also benefit from this course.

Dr. Nigel George, Professor of Physics and Mathematics
FYS 104 1A TR 12:50-1:50pm

On Course in Science: Finding Yourself among the Facts

In this section of FYS, you will apply learning strategies to scientific content relevant to daily life. You will practice essential “skill sets for success” for majors in the life and chemical sciences, and explore career opportunities available in these fields. Essential concepts that are routinely used in scientific careers will be introduced, including interpreting graphs, using measurement and scale, making sense of science-specific vocabulary and engaging with science as both a body of knowledge and a process. Majors in the Department of Biology and Chemistry include Biology, Conservation Management, Chemistry, Forensic Science, Life Science, and Mortuary Science.

Dr. Rebecca Schmidt, Assistant Professor of Biology
FYS 104 1B TR 12:50-1:50pm

Dr. Scott Figdore, Professor of Science/Robert L Fox Chair of Science
FYS 104 1C MW 12:50-1:50pm

Session 2

First Year Seminar for S.T.E.M. Professions

You will learn the critical role S.T.E.M. professionals play in the functioning of our society and in shaping our future, and how you can contribute to creating a better world. This course helps you identify your personal and professional goals, and approaches and strategies you can implement to overcome barriers to their achievement. You will learn what it means to be a professional in today’s information economy, including Environmental Science, Information Technology, Information Systems, Software Engineering, Mathematics, and Actuarial Science. Undecided students who are interested in these careers may also benefit from this course.

Dr. James Jacobs, Assistant Professor of Information Technology
FYS 114 2A TR 12:50-1:50pm

On Course in Science: Finding Yourself among the Facts

In this section of FYS, you will apply learning strategies to scientific content relevant to daily life. You will practice essential “skill sets for success” for majors in the life and chemical sciences, and explore career opportunities available in these fields. Essential concepts that are routinely used in scientific careers will be introduced, including interpreting graphs, using measurement and scale, making sense of science-specific vocabulary and engaging with science as both a body of knowledge and a process. Majors in the Department of Biology and Chemistry include Biology, Conservation Management, Chemistry, Forensic Science, Life Science, and Mortuary Science.

Dr. Sara Sheeley, Associate Professor of Biology
FYS 114 2B TR 12:50-1:50pm

Dr. Jennifer Stoffel, Associate Professor of Biology
FYS 114 2C MW 12:50-1:50pm

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